ARRL 2018 SET 13 October 2018

Accessed on 16 September 2018, 1341 UTC, Post #692.

Source:

Email message from Joseph Speroni (AH0A), ARRL Pacific Section Manager and Jim (NH6HI) on Kauai.

Comment:

The 2018 ARRL Simulated Emergency Test (SET) will occur on Saturday, 13 October 2018, from 0900 to 1200 HST.

Here are some observations from Joe (AH0A) and Jim (NH6HI).

ARRL 2018 SET

Inbox x

Joseph Speroni

Sep 15, 2018, 9:12 PM (6 hours ago)
to PascalKevinSeanJamesGlennLesliemeDarrenEricNormClementWH6FBPgdatlof

Hi all,

 

Attached is the final copy of Hawaii’s 2018 ARRL SET scheduled for October 13.  This year we decided to try to emulate what Puerto Rico did in developing an incident map immediately after a major hurricane knocks out Internet, repeaters, cell phone an all we have left is simplex.

 

County EOCs won’t be active on the weekend of the SET so we have to look for volunteers to simulate them, especially on HF. An the ability to handle Winlink will be a plus although we want all modes to be able to contribute.  Just no repeaters – .

 

Please promote the event as we would like as much participation as possible.  Stations do not have to be ARES members.

 

The ARES DECs (District Emergency Coordinator) have already received the plan and may contact some of you for help organizing participation.  Let them and Clem Jung (KH7HO – ARRL Section Emergency Coordinator) know if you have any ideas to make the event a success.

 

73, Joe/AH0A

ARRL SM PACSEC

Attachments area

James R. Pilgram <jim.pilgram@gmail.com>

Sep 15, 2018, 11:26 PM (4 hours ago)
to JosephPascalKevinSeanGlennLesliemeDarrenEricNormClementWH6FBPgdatlof

Joe,

For the HF winlink gateway’s like WH6FG, Will we be simulating internet outage to force forwarding of messages over radio or do we still stay hooked to the internet too? I have and will be switching to emergency power at my QTH to test my system. I don’t know anyone running/can run packet on Kauai except me.

I’m also in the process of finding someone here on Kauai to take possession of the ARRL Go Kit and set up a voice/winlink HF station.

Jim NH6HI


Hawaii Amateur/Ham Radio notes:

Now that we’ve been reminded about the 2018 SET, this would be a good time to participate in the Fifth Annual Hawaiian Islands Grid Madness VHF/UHF simplex contest.  The event takes place today, Sunday, 16 September 2018, from 1300 to 1700 HST.  The Aulani Hui Amateur Repeater Club sponsors the annual fun event “to test your equipment, coverage and operating skills using simplex FM on 2 meter and 70 cm.”  For information, please visit https://gridmadness.blogspot.com.

For the latest Amateur/Ham Radio news and information, please check the blog sidebars and links.  These news feeds are updated daily and weekly.  Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de

Russell Roberts (KH6JRM)

Public Information Coordinator

Hawaii County, ARRL Pacific Section

Propagation Forecast Bulletin 36, 08 September 2018

Accessed on 09 September 2018, 0541 UTC, Post #982.

Source:

http://www.arrl.org

QST de W1AW

Author:  Tad Cook (K7RA).

Here is the latest propagation forecast bulletin from Tad Cook (K7RA) and HQ ARRL in Newington, CT, 06111.

Comment:

Please scroll down to read the complete report.  Views expressed in this propagation bulletin are those of the reporters and correspondents.

ARRL Web site

Sep 7, 2018, 5:47 AM (1 day ago)
 to me
SB PROP @ ARL $ARLP036
ARLP036 Propagation de K7RA

ZCZC AP36
QST de W1AW
Propagation Forecast Bulletin 36  ARLP036
From Tad Cook, K7RA
Seattle, WA  September 7, 2018
To all radio amateurs

SB PROP ARL ARLP036
ARLP036 Propagation de K7RA

Sunspots disappeared again, since August 28. Average daily sunspot
number dropped from 17.7 (during the prior week) to 0, (naturally).

Average daily solar flux declined from 70.6 to 67.8. Geomagnetic
indicators quieted, with average daily planetary A index changing
from 19.9 to 6.3, and mid-latitude A index going from 13.4 to 5.9.

Predicted solar flux is 68 on September 7-14, 75 on September 15-17,
72 on September 18-22, 70 on September 23, 68 on September 24
through October 1, 70 on October 2-6, 72 on October 7, 70 on October
8-9, 75 on October 10-14, 72 on October 15-19, 70 on October 20 and
68 on October 21.

Predicted  planetary A index is 12, 10, 5 and 5 on September 7-10,
20, 15 and 12 on September 11-13, 12 on September 13, 10 on
September 14-15, then 15 and 10 on September 16-17, 5 on September
18-21, then 12 and 8 on September 22-23, 5 on September 24-29, 8 on
September 30, 5 on October 1-3, then 8, 12, and 8, on October 4-6,
then 5, 18 and 15 on October 7-9, 12 on October 10-11, then 10, 15
and 10 on October 12-14, 5 on October 15-18, then 12, 8 and 5 on
October 19-21.

When might sunspots return? In recent periods such as this when the
Sun has been blank for days or weeks, I’ve referenced predicted
solar flux values and assumed that relatively higher flux values may
indicate when we may see the return of sunspots. But this has often
led to disappointment.

Looking at the latest forecast (from
ftp://ftp.swpc.noaa.gov/pub/forecasts/45DF/) it would seem that
September 15-17 (when predicted solar flux is 75) and October 10-14
(the same) are likely times to see sunspots again, or at least more
likely than days with lower solar flux predictions. We’ll see.

In each case when an expected sunspot return did not appear, the
solar flux forecast changed in advance of the predicted enhanced
period.

“OK1HH Geomagnetic activity forecast for the period September 07
till October 03, 2018

“Geomagnetic field will be:
Quiet on September 9, 17
Quiet to unsettled on September 10, 18-20, 25-28
Quiet to active on September 8, 13-15, 24, October 2
Unsettled to active on September 7, 12, 16, 21, 29-30, October 1
Active to disturbed n September 11, 22-23

“Solar wind will intensify on September (10-11,) 14-17, (21,) 22-24,
(25), October 1

“Remarks:
– Parenthesis means lower probability of activity enhancement.
– Reliability of predictions remains low, of course.

“F. K. Janda, OK1HH (from Czech Propagation Interested Group
compiling this geomagnetic activity weekly forecasts since 1978).”

Frank Donovan, W3LPL of Glenwood, Maryland wrote on August 31:

“The Solar-Terrestrial Centre of Excellence (STCE) reports that last
weekend’s reverse polarity sunspot group 2720 belongs to current
Solar Cycle 24.

“Because of its reversed polarity, some websites claimed sunspot
group 2720 was possibly one of the first groups of new Solar Cycle
25. This is simply not true, in view of its very low eight degree
latitude.

“The next Solar Cycle 25 sunspot groups should have both reversed
magnetic polarity and much higher heliographic latitude, typically
20 to 40 degrees from the equator.

“Only two tiny short-lived numbered sunspot groups are currently
assigned to new Solar Cycle 25, sunspot group 2620 in December 2016
and 2694 in January 2018.  While both tiny sunspots were assigned to
Solar Cycle 25, there is some uncertainty about which sunspot cycle
they actually belong to. A few additional sunspot groups belong to
Solar Cycle 25, but they were so tiny and very short-lived that they
did not get an assigned sunspot number.

“During each solar cycle, about 3% of all active regions have
reversed polarity but do not belong to the previous or next solar
cycle. This percentage varies somewhat from one solar cycle to the
next. With 2000 to 3000 sunspot groups per solar cycle, this means
that every solar cycle has a few dozen reverse polarity sunspots
that belong to the ongoing sunspot cycle despite their reverse
polarity.

“See the full STCE story at:

www.stce.be/newsletter/pdf/2018/STCEnews20180831.pdf

“This STCE news item provides more details on these numbered and
unnumbered Solar Cycle 25 regions and how solar magnetograms are
used to detect opposite polarity sunspots:

www.stce.be/news/422/welcome.html ”

Thank you, Frank. Readers may want to check the W3LPL page on
QRZ.com for impressive photos of his antennas, including this one:

https://bit.ly/2MR1ZYL

Here is the latest from Dr. Tamitha Skov, dated September 4:

https://youtu.be/GRjrIQYVZ6A

Ran across this, from the end of August:

https://youtu.be/qtc2oqeSKoo

If you would like to make a comment or have a tip for our readers,
email the author at, k7ra@arrl.net .

For more information concerning radio propagation, see the ARRL
Technical Information Service web page at,
http://arrl.org/propagation-of-rf-signals. For an explanation of
numbers used in this bulletin, see
http://arrl.org/the-sun-the-earth-the-ionosphere.

An archive of past propagation bulletins is at
http://arrl.org/w1aw-bulletins-archive-propagation. More good
information and tutorials on propagation are at http://k9la.us/.

Monthly propagation charts between four USA regions and twelve
overseas locations are at http://arrl.org/propagation.

Instructions for starting or ending email distribution of ARRL
bulletins are at http://arrl.org/bulletins.

Sunspot numbers for August 30 through September 5, 2018 were 0, 0,
0, 0, 0, 0, and 0, with a mean of 0. 10.7 cm flux was 68.3, 67.5,
68.3, 67.7, 68.1, 67.5, and 67.5, with a mean of 67.8. Estimated
planetary A indices were 4, 5, 5, 5, 5, 9, and 11, with a mean of
6.3. Estimated mid-latitude A indices were 5, 4, 5, 5, 4, 9, and 9,
with a mean of 5.9.
NNNN
/EX

Attachments area
Preview YouTube video A Coronal Hole Sandwich with a Side of Aurora: Solar Storm Shortie 09-04-2018
A Coronal Hole Sandwich with a Side of Aurora: Solar Storm Shortie 09-04-2018

Preview YouTube video Q&A Live Mini Course on Hurricane Lane Solar Storm

Q&A Live Mini Course on Hurricane Lane Solar Storm
—————————

Hawaii Island Amateur/Ham Radio notes:

The Fifth Annual Hawaiian Islands Grid Madness VHF/UHF simplex event is set for Sunday, 16 September 2018, from 1300 to 1700 HST.  The Aulani Amateur Repeater Club sponsors the fun contest “to test your equipment, coverage and operating skills using simplex FM on 2 meters and 70 cm.  Contact as many stations as you can in as many Grid Squares as you can, using SIMPLEX ONLY.”  For details, visit https://gridmadness.blogspot.com.

For the latest Amateur/Ham Radio news and information, please check the blog sidebars and links.  These news feeds are updated daily and weekly.  Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de

Russell Roberts (KH6JRM)

Public Information Coordinator

Hawaii County, ARRL Pacific Section

Hawaii State VOAD Maunakea 146.72-MHz Repeater test on Saturday, 31 August 2018

Accessed on 01 September 2018, 0548 UTC, Post #675.

Source:

Email message from Ceridwen Sanders (AH6CS).

Comment:

The regular monthly test of the RACES/VOAD Maunakea Repeater (146.72- MHz, PL 100.0 Hz) is set for Saturday, 01 September 2018 from 1200 to 1300 HST.  It’s important to keep this repeater alive and available for emergency use. Here are some comments from Ceridwn Sanders (AH6CS):

Ceridwen Sanders

3:53 PM (3 hours ago)
to DaleJimCindySheldonJohnMarkJamesmeBeboDonaldJohnHowardTinaJimNormSteveAprilJoeEricSteveJohnTerenceVictorFrancineRobertJimKerryLovingceridwen
We’re in danger of losing the Big Island VOAD repeater.
The basic info about the repeater and how it’s used have not been clear to us before this but what we’ve learned recently  is this:
>  in an emergency, this is the only way for VHF operators to connect with each other directly throughout the island
> there is no  agency, state or county, overseeing our island’s use of the repeater during emergencies and during our monthly comms check
>  BI hams are responsible for overseeing its use,  its maintenance,  and establishing protocols for its use
> if we don’t use it more effectively, we will lose it
 
 
 
Please call in tomorrow, Saturday, 12:00-1:00 when the repeater  will be available  for a test of how many North Hawaii hams want VHF connection in an emergency.
Kevin Bogan is correct:  if we don’t use it, we’ll lose it.
  • Hawaii State VOAD Maunakea 146.72- MHz repeater (PL 100.0Hz)
  • 1200 – 1300 HST 
Please help.  This is our VHF  lifeline.
73, Ceri
Ceridwen Sanders AH6CS
Richard Bowen AH6RK
PO Box 138
43-1781 Manienie Road
Paauilo, HI 96776
808-938-9012
808-657-8626

————————-

Hawaii Amateur/Ham Radio notes:

The Fifth Annual Hawaiian Islands Grid Madness is coming to Hawaii on Sunday, 16 September 2018, from 1300 to 1700 HST.  The Aulani Repeater Club sponsors the annual VHF/UHF event “to test your equipment, coverage and operating skills using SIMPLEX FM ONLY on 2 meters and 70 cm.”  For details, visit https://gridmadness.blogspot.com.

For the latest Amateur/Ham Radio news and information, please check the blog sidebars and links.  These news feeds are updated daily and weekly. Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de

Russell Roberts (KH6JRM)

Public Information Coordinator

Hawaii County, ARRL Pacific Section

 

ARRL News-Features

Accessed on 14 August 2018, 0509 UTC, Post #654.

Source:

http://www.arrl.org/news-features

Please click link or scroll down to read your selections.

Comment:

Here are some of the top Amateur/Ham Radio news stories and events compiled by HQ ARRL, Newington, CT, 06111. Views expressed in this news summary are those of the reporters and correspondents.

ARLP031 Propagation de K7RA

Accessed on 04 August 2018, 1613 UTC, Post #644.

Source:

QST de W1AW and HQ ARRL, Newington, CT, 06111.

Here is the complete propagation bulletin from W1AW and Tad Cook (K7RA):

SB PROP @ ARL $ARLP031
ARLP031 Propagation de K7RA

ZCZC AP31
QST de W1AW
Propagation Forecast Bulletin 31  ARLP031
From Tad Cook, K7RA
Seattle, WA  August 3, 2018
To all radio amateurs

SB PROP ARL ARLP031
ARLP031 Propagation de K7RA

After six days with no visible sunspots, a new one appeared on
Wednesday, August, 1, with a daily sunspot number of 11. As there
was also only one day with a sunspot (also 11) in the previous week,
average daily sunspot number for this week was unchanged at 1.6. The
new sunspot is small and was given the number AR2717 on Thursday,
when the sunspot number again was 11.

Average daily solar flux was down from 68.4 to 68. Average daily
planetary A index decreased from 8.1 to 5, while average daily
mid-latitude A index went from 8 to 5.1.

According to an August 2 forecast prepared by the US Air Force,
predicted solar flux is expected to be 70 on August 3, 72 on August
4 to 9, 71 on August 10, 70 on August 11 to 17, 68 on August 18 to
20, 66 on August 21 to 23, 68 on August 24 through September 6, 70
on September 7 to 13, and 68 on September 14 to 16.

Predicted planetary A index is 8 on August 3, 10 on August 4 and 5,
6 on August 6, 8 on August 7 and 8, 5 on August 9 to 11, 8 on August
12 and 13, 5 on August 14 and 15, then 8 and 12 on August 16 and 17,
5 on August 18 and 19, 20 and 12 on August 20 and 21, 5 on August 22
through September 1, then 10 and 8 on September 2 and 3, 5 on
September 4 and 7, 8 on September 8 and 9, 5 on September 10 and 11,
8 and 12 on September 12 and 13, 5 on September 14 and 15 and 20 on
September 16.

Reader Max White, M0VNG of Worcester, England sent this about
experiments with ionospheric sounding over 50 years ago, both below
and above the ionosphere:

https://bit.ly/2LNGrvJ

Jeff, N8II wrote:

“There has been sporadic E to somewhere every day on 10M in the past
week, but today, August 2nd, was absolutely amazing. It all started
working MW0EDX, Wales on 15M CW via sporadic E with a good signal at
1815Z. Then I called CQ on 15 CW and DL4KCA answered. He was 589 on
15 CW with a 3 element StepIR; we tried 12M and he was 549 (my
antenna 2 el vs 5 el Yagi on 15 and 10), and 549 on 10 CW.

I worked Fred F5NBX, a 10 CW regular just after Joe and tried more
CQ’s on 10 and 15 to no avail. Then, the big surprise happened at
1905Z when I heard Vlad, R2KW 549 on 10 CW in Kaliningrad in a QSO;
one try and I was in his log. Then the following stations answered
my CW CQ’s: UA3EDQ, RZ3AK, and RQ3A Moscow, RU2K Kaliningrad, and
UX7IB and UX2VA in Ukraine all S 2-3.

Then still in 1900Z hour, I had a few western EU stations call on CW
from Germany, France, PA0KBN Netherlands (new DXCC band slot since
1/17) and ON4BCN Belgium (new slot). I then found OH0Z Aland Is. who
was 549 (new slot)! This was followed by 9A2018CRO Croatia, and more
from Italy, Germany, France and England.

The 2000Z hour was relatively quiet with Hristo LZ2HR found at 2010Z
and Q5 copy for the next 2 hours! Also on 10 CW I worked one each
Spain, Italy, and England in the hour. I was about to QRT for dinner
at 2100Z when a few new stations appeared. On SSB Ian MM0TFU called
in very weak followed by CW QSO’s with OH0Z now 559, Germany, Spain,
and Robert S50R Slovenia. Then at 2122-2151Z conditions markedly
improved and on SSB I ran 30 European stations all in Germany,
England, Spain, France, Italy, Netherlands, Belgium, and Portugal.
The last few minutes were spent chasing DX cluster spots and
spotting some stations of my own on CW working ZB2FK Gibraltar (new
slot), KL7SB/VP9 Bermuda (new slot), LZ3ZZ, TA1D Istanbul, Turkey
(new slot), and MU0FAL Guernsey at 2205Z. After a dinner break at
2246Z, the band seemed to have closed to EU, but VY2CAK on Prince
Edward Island was S9+.

In my 47 plus years of operating I had never worked Russia,
Kaliningrad, Ukraine, Aland Is., or Turkey on 10M via sporadic E
during the summer months; it was an incredible opening!” (When Jeff
says “new slot” it refers to the first time working a DXCC country
on a particular band, as he explained above.)

Jon Jones, N0JK in Lawrence, Kansas sent this on August 2: “Usually
the sporadic E season winds down in August. But so far it has been
going strong. A big E opening on 6 meters August 1 from Japan to the
southeast states, and N0LL and I had CT1HZE into Kansas August 1. On
August 2 Europe was in for hours as far west as the Mississippi
River. Why the good conditions? It has also been a great season for
NLC (noctilucent clouds). They form at 85 km altitude. The E-layer
is 90 – 160 km high. Perhaps the same upper atmosphere conditions
keeping NLC going strong may be influencing sporadic E. See
Spaceweather.com.”

Note that Spaceweather.com has a gallery of images devoted to NLC:

http://spaceweathergallery.com/nlc_gallery.html

Frantisek Janda, OK1HH sent the following from Ondrejov in the Czech
Republic. See his bio on QRZ.com for more about him.

“Geomagnetic activity forecast for the period August 3 to 29, 2018.

Geomagnetic field will be:
Quiet on August 5, 10 and 11, 15, 23-24
Quiet to unsettled on August 14, 16, 22
Quiet to active on August 3 and 4, 6 to 9, 12, 25 to 29
Unsettled to active on August 12, 17 to 19, 21
Active to disturbed on August (13,) 20

Solar wind will intensify on August (16 to 19,) 20 to 22, 28 to 30

Remarks:
– Parenthesis means lower probability of activity enhancement.
– Reliability of predictions remains low.”

Dr. Tamitha Skov sent this, followed by her video for this week:

“Dear Tad,

Last week I mentioned traveling was always an adventure and this
trip has been no exception. After being unable to connect to the
television in my hotel room (I tried with two separate computers), I
settled for shooting my forecast using my mobile phone camera in a
way it was never intended. The result has been an unconventional
video to say the least. I almost didn’t post it, as it’s not up to
my usual standards, but I figured you would forgive the
imperfections in favor of the content.

Additionally, I apologize for getting this newsletter out to you a
little late this week. Spotty internet connection while on the road
has prevented me from sending it out until today. However, being
mobile in Europe this week has given me the chance to reflect on how
deeply entrenched space exploration is in our global culture. In
fact, while in Amsterdam I came across an art installation showing
an astronaut impossibly balancing between a chair and a flower pot
(see https://bit.ly/2LRDIl2). The Joseph Klibansky installation,
called “Self-Portrait of a Dreamer,” succinctly captures our
culture’s dreamy fascination with space and its intersection with
objects in our more ordinary lives.

As I stared up at this massive structure, the symbolism began to
sink in. I realized we are a lot like that dreamy astronaut,
striving to blend our understanding of space with its impacts on our
everyday world. I also realized that just like the astronaut, we too
will one day soon strike a perfect balance.

This week’s forecast brings us an Earth-directed stealthy solar
storm followed by a small pocket of fast wind that will likely have
little effect, but could bring subtle aurora to high latitudes. Even
though GPS users might experience glitchy reception near aurora,
users at low latitudes should enjoy better than normal reception due
to the light impact of the storm. The Sun also has two bright
regions rotating into Earth-view this week that should help keep
amateur radio propagation near marginal levels, so there is some
good news for everyone.

Cheers, Tamitha”

https://youtu.be/MTl5ETzb4_4

For more information concerning radio propagation, see the ARRL
Technical Information Service at
http://arrl.org/propagation-of-rf-signals. For an explanation of
numbers used in this bulletin, see
http://arrl.org/the-sun-the-earth-the-ionosphere.

An archive of past propagation bulletins is at
http://arrl.org/w1aw-bulletins-archive-propagation. More good
information and tutorials on propagation are at http://k9la.us/.

Monthly propagation charts between four USA regions and twelve
overseas locations are at http://arrl.org/propagation.

Instructions for starting or ending email distribution of ARRL
bulletins are at http://arrl.org/bulletins.

Sunspot numbers for July 26 through August 1, 2018 were 0, 0, 0, 0,
0, 0, and 11, with a mean of 1.6. 10.7 cm flux was 66.2, 66.6,
67.9, 68, 68.3, 68.9, and 70.2, with a mean of 68. Estimated
planetary A indices were 4, 4, 5, 5, 5, 6, and 6, with a mean of 5.
Estimated mid-latitude A indices were 6, 4, 6, 5, 5, 5, and 5, with
a mean of 5.1.
NNNN
/EX

Attachments area
Preview YouTube video Special Report from Belgium: Solar Storm Forecast 08-01-2018
Special Report from Belgium: Solar Storm Forecast 08-01-2018

———————–

Hawaii Island Amateur/Ham Radio Notes:

Oscar Resto (KP4RF), the Puerto Rico ARRL Section Manager, will be speaking at the LDS Church in Orchidland on Tuesday, 28 August 2018, 2 p.m./6 p.m. HST. The presentation will focus on aspects of the devastation caused by hurricane Maria last year in the Commonwealth and how Amateur Radio responded to provide communications. Both meetings are open to the general public.  Other Hawaii Island clubs are planning presentations on the 29th. Please RSVP to Pascal (ac7n@arrl.net) so we can get a head count for event planning.

The Fifth Annual Hawaiian Islands Grid Madness is coming Sunday, 16 September 2018, from 1300 to 1700 HST. The Aulani Hui Amateur Repeater Club sponsors this VHF/UHF Simplex Event “to test your equipment, coverage and operating skills using simplex FM on 2 meters and 70 cm…”  For details, visit https://gridmadness.blogspot.com.

Jim Sugg (AH6AE) needs some Hawaii Island radio amateurs “to demo how ham radio works at (the) upcoming emergency preparedness fair in Waimea (Hawaii Island)…on Saturday, August 25, 2018, from 8am-12pm.”  The event will be held at the Mana Christian Ohana Hall near the Kahilu Theatre.  For details, call Jim at (808) 747-4500 (mobile).

Aloha es 73 de

Russell Roberts (KH6JRM)

Public Information Coordinator

Hawaii County, ARRL Pacific Section

The ARRL Letter for August 2, 2018

Accessed on 03 August 2018, 2003 UTC, Post #642.

Source:

http://www.arrl.org/arrlletter?issue=2018-08-02

Please click link to read the complete newsletter.

Comment:

Here are some of the topics discussed in the current edition of “The ARRL Letter.”  Views expressed in this news summary are those of the reporters and correspondents.