Tag Archives: DX-Contest

ARLP032 Propagation de K7RA


Here’s the latest Propagation Forecast from Tad Cook (K7RA).

Views expressed in this Amateur/Ham Radio propagation summary are those of the reporters and correspondents.

Content supplied by W1AW, Tad Cook (K7RA), and HQ ARRL, 225 Main Street, Newington, CT, 06111.

Accessed on 10 August 2019, 0650 UTC, Post 1071.

Source:

https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/?tab=rm&ogbl#label/ARRL+website/FMfcgxwDqfGcDQlKKmTLQVtKszVXcfsv

Please click link or scroll down to read the complete forecast:

SB PROP @ ARL $ARLP032
ARLP032 Propagation de K7RA

ZCZC AP32
QST de W1AW
Propagation Forecast Bulletin 32  ARLP032
From Tad Cook, K7RA
Seattle, WA  August 9, 2019
To all radio amateurs

SB PROP ARL ARLP032
ARLP032 Propagation de K7RA

A new sunspot group appeared only briefly this week, on August 7 and
8.  It was sunspot 2747, from current cycle 24.  Sunspot numbers on
Monday and Tuesday were 11 and 12.

Average daily solar flux shifted only slightly from last week, from
67 to 67.2.  Average planetary A index, a geomagnetic indicator
aggregated from magnetometers around the world, more than doubled,
from 5 to 10.3.  This was due to solar wind which raised the
planetary A index to 35 on Monday.  Alaska’s high latitude college A
index reached 61 on Monday and 24 on Tuesday.

Predicted solar flux is 68 on August 9 to 16 and 67 on August 17
through September 22.

Predicted planetary A index is 5 on August 9, then 8 on August 10
and 11, 5 on August 12 to 16, 8 on August 17 and 18, 5 on August 19
to 25, 8 on August 26 to 28, 5 on August 29 and 30, then 12, 25, 25,
16 and 8 on August 31 through September 4, then 5, 8 and 8 on
September 5 to 7, 5 on September 8 to 12, 8 on September 13 and 14,
then 5 on September 15 to 21 and 8 on September 22.

OK1HH sent his geomagnetic activity forecast for the period August 9
to September 4, 2019, a day early this week.  There will be no
forecast from him next week.

“Geomagnetic field will be
Quiet on: August 12, 16, 21, September 4
Quiet to unsettled on: August 9, 13 to 15, 17, 22, 29 and 30, September 3
Quiet to active on: August 10 (- 11,) 19 and 20, 23 to 25, 28, 31
Unsettled to active on: August (18, 26 to 28), September 1, (-2)
Active to disturbed- none

Solar wind will intensify on: August (9 to 14,) 27 to 29, (30 and
31, September 1 and 2)

– Parenthesis means lower probability of activity enhancement.
– Next forecast will be issued on August 22”

Dr. Tamitha Skov, WX6SWW posted a new 3-hour (!) long space weather
mini-course a few days ago:

https://youtu.be/56oVhXD7AZE

Here is her report from August 8:

https://youtu.be/a3hiGPOHZ-U

Tamitha will be one of the speakers this Saturday at the Pacific
Northwest DX Convention, along with Joe Taylor, K1JT:

https://pacificnwdxconvention.com/

Mark, K4SO in Virginia wrote on August 8:

“My friend and neighbor, K1HTV, suggested I drop you a note about a
brief, surprising opening on 10M this morning.

I had my small tribander (A3S) almost due north, and decided to drop
down from 6M to 10M, on the way down to more ‘active bands.’  JTDX
was running, as usual, when I got a JTAlert audio message ‘DX’ and
looked to find a decode of RV0AR, calling CQ SA.  I assumed it was a
broken decode of some noise, but the next cycle it changed to CQ NA.
I started calling with 100W, and turned on my Alpha 89, which
features ‘the longest 3 minutes in ham radio’ while the filaments
warm up.

I used JTAlert’s text function to encourage to ask him to keep
calling, but no indication he was online.  That is, by the way, an
underutilized service.  Anyway, luckily for me, his signal continued
to build as the tubes warmed up.

I wondered if he was telling his local ham friends, ‘Hey I just
worked NA.’ (in Russian of course, hi.)”

Mike, KA3JAW likes to monitor various VHF services, such as FM
broadcast, for sporadic-e.  He forwarded a report from William
Hepburn in Grimsby, Ontario Canada who monitored over 45 minutes of
e-skip from 162 MHz weather radio broadcasts from eight stations in
Kansas, Arkansas, Colorado and Oklahoma from 2:19 PM to 3:06 PM
local time back on July 20.  Distances ranged from 839 to 1,253
miles.

If you would like to make a comment or have a tip for our readers,
email the author at, k7ra@arrl.net.

For more information concerning radio propagation, see the ARRL
Technical Information Service at
http://arrl.org/propagation-of-rf-signals.  For an explanation of
numbers used in this bulletin, see
http://arrl.org/the-sun-the-earth-the-ionosphere.

An archive of past propagation bulletins is at
http://arrl.org/w1aw-bulletins-archive-propagation.  More good
information and tutorials on propagation are at http://k9la.us/.

Monthly propagation charts between four USA regions and twelve
overseas locations are at http://arrl.org/propagation.

Instructions for starting or ending email distribution of ARRL
bulletins are at http://arrl.org/bulletins.

Sunspot numbers for August 1 through 7, 2019 were 0, 0, 0, 0, 12,
11, and 0, with a mean of 3.3.  10.7 cm flux was 66.8, 66.9, 65.7,
66.9, 68.1, 68.1, and 68, with a mean of 67.2.  Estimated planetary
A indices were 8, 4, 3, 4, 35, 12, and 6 with a mean of 10.3.
Middle latitude A index was 8, 4, 4, 6, 20, 10, and 6, with a mean
of 8.3.
NNNN
/EX

Attachments area
Preview YouTube video Q&A Live Mini Course: Scream Heard Round the World— Solar Flares & Radio Bursts Continued

Preview YouTube video Sunspots Blossom & Sailing the Solar Winds | Space Weather News 08.08.2019

ARRL News-Features


Welcome to the “ARRL News-Features” update from Big Island ARRL News.

Views expressed in this Amateur/Ham Radio News summary are those of the reporters and correspondents.

Content, including text, photos, images, and video, provided by HQ ARRL, 225 Main Street, Newington, CT, 06111.

Accessed on 16 July 2019, 0455 UTC, Post 1041.

Source:  http://www.arrl.org/news-features.

Please scroll down to read your selections.

ARRL News-Features


Welcome to a “Hawaii Amateur/Ham Radio News” update from Big Island ARRL News.

Views expressed in this Amateur/Ham Radio news summary are those of the reporters and correspondents.

Content, including text, photos, images, and video, provided by HQ ARRL, 225 Main Street, Newington, CT, 06111.

Accessed on 05 July 2019, 0255 UTC, Post 1028.

Source:  http://www.arrl.org/news-features.

Please scroll down to read your selections.

The ARRL Letter for June 6, 2019


Welcome to “The ARRL Letter” update from Big Island ARRL News. Views expressed in this Amateur/Ham Radio News summary are those of the reporters and correspondents.  Content provided by HQ ARRL, 225 Main Street, Newington, CT, 06111.  Rick Lindquist (WW1ME) is the editor of “The ARRL Letter.”

Source:  http://www.arrl.org/arrlletter?issue=2019-06-06

Please scroll down to read the full text of “The ARRL Letter”.   At the close of the letter, I’ll have a few remarks pertaining to Hawaii Island radio amateurs.

Emergency Messaging Demonstration for Red Cross, FEMA is a Success

On May 23, with Red Cross and Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) officials monitoring, dozens of radio amateurs along the US east coast demonstrated Amateur Radio’s ability to deliver messages without commercial power, infrastructure, or permanently established stations. The event took place in coordination with ARRL, as a mock response to a simulated disaster scenario — a major hurricane with mass casualties. During the event, radio amateurs at portable stations from New England to the Carolinas delivered message traffic to W1AW, which coordinated and delivered the information to officials attending a joint Red Cross-FEMA meeting in Baltimore.

W1AW Station Manager Joe Carcia, NJ1Q (front), and ARRL Emergency Preparedness Assistant Manager Ken Bailey, K1FUG, working the mics while Red Cross volunteer Rosty Slabicky, W2ROS, looks on. [Michelle Patnode, W3MVP, photo]

“About a dozen stations participated in the demonstration, including operators in Maine, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New York, northern New Jersey, western Pennsylvania, Delaware, and South Carolina,” ARRL Communications Manager Dave Isgur, N1RSN, said. “Red Cross officials were on-site at W1AW and at the receiving station in Baltimore. At both sites, they indicated that were impressed with Amateur Radio’s ability to deliver messages digitally so that could be displayed on a computer screen and in a format that matched the format for messages that the Red Cross uses.” Isgur said ABC, CBS, and Fox TV affiliates sent reporting teams to W1AW.

A few stations, including W1AW and stations in Baltimore, generated local media coverage of their participation, much of it tied into the notion of “Amateur Radio operators and the partner agencies they serve are getting ready for the 2018 hurricane season,” which begins on June 1 and continues through November 30.

W1AW Station Manager Joe Carcia, NJ1Q, said the exercise went well overall. “Conditions were a bit tepid at best, but we were able to establish voice contact first, and then proceed with the digital traffic (MT63-1KS) during the roll call,” Carcia said. “Digital signals were good. I needed just one retransmit. We used fldigi with flmsg. This made life so much easier.”

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Ohio ARES Activates in Wake of Tornadoes that Badly Damaged Hara Arena

Hara Arena, in Trotwood, Ohio, which served as the home for Dayton Hamvention® for more than 6 decades, was among the structures extensively damaged when tornadoes swept through the Dayton area on Memorial Day. WHIO-TV drone video showed that the roof and side of the structure had been blown off in several places by the EF3 (severe-scale damage) event. Ohio Section Emergency Coordinator Stan Broadway, N8BHL, said ARES counties and districts activated after nearly 40 tornado warnings were issued across the state. He said Ohio ARES was in the process of announcing a partnership with the Ohio Emergency Management Agency Watch Desk, in which some 2,000 Ohio radio amateurs will feed situation awareness to the state.

“Our plan was to use the Ohio DMR statewide talk group along with our normal HF 80-meter voice and digital nets — depending on storm noise,” Broadway said. “We got to launch that system under pressure [on] Memorial Day.” Broadway said information received from radio amateurs during the all-night effort was fed directly into the state’s WebEOC software to help the Watch Desk determine the need to assist county EMA directors requests for aid. The Ohio AuxComm’s W8SGT was on the air continuously, receiving reports from county ARES groups, he added.

The severe weather struck after dark, causing widespread damage in and around Dayton and elsewhere in the Miami Valley. Multiple injuries and one fatality have been reported. It appears that at least two tornadoes were responsible for most of the devastation, which was called “catastrophic.” The NWS office in Wilmington, Ohio, estimated that at one point, storms and tornadoes left some 5 million people without electrical power.

Snow plows were repurposed to remove debris from Interstate Route 75, and the American Red Cross set up shelters to accommodate displaced residents.

“First-tier communications remained solid in most of the affected areas,” Broadway recounted, “but amateur operators were able to provide situational awareness that enhanced the response.” Most ARES activities in Ohio wrapped up on May 29.

WHIO-TV reported on June 5 that structural engineers were still assessing the damage at Hara Arena, but Michael Heitz, the Kentucky developer who now owns the building and the surrounding 120 acres, has expressed confidence that the main arena can be saved, although an attached section will have to be demolished.

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Hurricane Michael Investigation Digs into Factors that Hindered Wireless Services Recovery

On May 9, the FCC’s Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau released a report on its investigation into communications providers’ preparation for and response to Hurricane Michael last October. An array of Amateur Radio public service assets was active as Hurricane Michael made landfall near Mexico Beach on the Florida Panhandle, boasting devastating 155 MPH winds. The storm was the first Category 4 or stronger hurricane to hit the Florida Panhandle since 1992.

The FCC investigation found that three key factors — insufficiently resilient backhaul connectivity, inadequate reciprocal roaming arrangements, and a lack of coordination between wireless service providers, power crews, and municipalities — were the predominant causes behind what the FCC called “the unacceptably slow restoration of wireless service in the Florida Panhandle” in the storm’s wake. According to the FCC, its investigation even found that recovery efforts themselves often led to communication outages.

“There were numerous cases in which a wireless provider had restored service to customers only to have that service brought down as third-party crews damaged communications assets while clearing trash or restoring power lines and utility poles,” the FCC recounted in a news release.

To improve recovery efforts from future storms, the report recommended, among other things, that wireless providers use diverse backhaul options, such as microwave links and satellite links in hurricane-prone areas, and that communication providers participate in training to improve coordination of restoration efforts.

The Hurricane Michael Report is available at on the FCC website. — FCC News Release


The Doctor Will See You Now!

“Stringing Up Wire Antennas” is the topic of the new (June 6) episode of the ARRL The Doctor is In podcast. Listen…and learn!

Sponsored by DX EngineeringARRL The Doctor is In is an informative discussion of all things technical. Listen on your computer, tablet, or smartphone — whenever and wherever you like!

Every 2 weeks, your host, QST Editor-in-Chief Steve Ford, WB8IMY, and the Doctor himself, Joel Hallas, W1ZR, will discuss a broad range of technical topics. You can also email your questions to doctor@arrl.org, and the Doctor may answer them in a future podcast.

Enjoy ARRL The Doctor is In on Apple iTunes, or by using your iPhone or iPad podcast app (just search for ARRL The Doctor is In). You can also listen online at Blubrry, or at Stitcher (free registration required, or browse the site as a guest) and through the free Stitcher app for iOS, Kindle, or Android devices. If you’ve never listened to a podcast before, download our beginner’s guide.

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New FT4 Beta Release “Leaps and Bounds” Better than Earlier Iterations

The WSJT-X Development Group released yet another new beta version of the FT4 protocol this week, and WSJT-X 2.1.0-rc7 is now available for testing. Developers point out that the FT4 included in this “release candidate 7” version is not compatible with any previous releases. A short mock contest session to wring out the contesting features of FT4 took place on June 4.

“Thanks to all who participated in yesterday’s FT4 mock-contest practice session — and especially to those who provided useful feedback. It is much appreciated!” said developer Joe Taylor, K1JT. “Everyone likes the 7.5-second T/R sequences, which provide operators with significantly more human interaction time than in previous revisions of FT4. Users also appreciated the sensitivity improvements and a larger range of acceptable time offsets (DT).” DT represents the combined clock difference for the transmitting and receiving computers, he explained.

Based on data compiled by Steve Franke, K9AN, Taylor said that it appears developers have the WSJT-X timing behavior under good control on all supported platforms, and the range of measured signal-to-noise values extended down to -21 dB.

“I operated for about 3 hours using 100 W and a dipole,” Taylor recounted. “I copied transmissions from 263 unique call signs and made 143 QSOs in 29 states, 5 Canadian provinces, and 15 DXCCs.”

Taylor said the developers anticipate addressing all remaining issues they’re aware of. “I believe we are on a good path toward a General Availability (GA) release of WSJT-X 2.1.0 by mid-July,” he said.

Steve Franke, K9AN, of the WSJT-X Development Group spent most of his time observing during the mock contest on June 4, decoding some 25,300 FT4 transmissions. This chart represents signal-to-noise ratios reported.

“This new version of FT4 is leaps and bounds better than before,” said Mike Black, W9MDB, in a June 4 post to the Yahoo WSJT Meteor Scatter and Weak Signal Group. “I worked almost everybody I could see without any repeats. Seems like we have a winner here.”

Changes, improvements, and bug fixes that have been made since WSJT-X 2.1.0-rc5 include:

  • T/R sequence length increased from 6.0 to 7.5 seconds.

  • Signal bandwidth decreased from 90 Hz to 80 Hz.

  • Improved sensitivity: Threshold S/N is now -17.5 dB.

Release candidate WSJT-X 2.1.0-rc7 will be available for beta-testing through July 21, and it will permanently cease to function after that date. It will not be usable during the ARRL June VHF Contest or during ARRL Field Day. Taylor advised using WSJT-X 2.0.1 and FT8 for these events.

Downloadable installation packages for WSJT-X 2.1.0-rc7 under Windows, Linux, and macOS are available on the WSJT-X web page.

China Set to Launch New Amateur Satellite with “Sail Ball” Stabilization

Chinese Amateur Satellite Group (CAMSAT) has announced the impending launch of the CAS-7B satellite, also designated as BP-1B, a short-lived spacecraft that will carry an Amateur Radio payload. An unusual feature of the spacecraft is its “sail ball” passive stabilization system. The 1.5 U CubeSat is attached to a 500-millimeter flexible film ball — or sail — that will offer passive “pneumatic resistance” stabilization, the announcement said. CAS-7B is expected to remain in orbit for up to 1 month.

The spacecraft will carry an Amateur Radio transponder and educational mission. CAMSAT is working with the Beijing Institute of Technology (BIT), a top aerospace school, which is providing launch support. BIT faculty and students are participating in the development and testing of the satellite, and, with CAMSAT’s help, the university has established an Amateur Radio club (BI1LG). CAMSAT said many students are now members, “learning Amateur Radio satellite communication and [experiencing] endless fun.”

The VHF and UHF antennas are quarter-wave monopoles. CAS-7B will transmit a CW telemetry beacon on 435.715 MHz. The V/U FM voice transponder downlink will be 435.690 MHz, and the transponder uplink will be 145.900 MHz (16 kHz passband).

CAS-7B during testing. [CAMSAT photo]

The 3-kilogram satellite will have an apogee of 300 kilometers.

“Because of the orbital apogee and the size and mass of the satellite, the orbital life is expected to be only 1 week, up to a maximum of 1 month, which will also provide an opportunity for hams to track and monitor satellite entering the atmosphere,” CAMSAT said in announcing the new satellite, scheduled for launch late this month.

“The launch will use a new launch vehicle from a small commercial rocket company,” CAMSAT explained. “This is the first launch of this launch vehicle, and there is a large possibility of failure; if the launch fails, we will have another launch later this year.” — Thanks to Alan Kung, BA1DU/CAMSAT

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Mexican Amateur Radio Volunteers Provide Communication in Wildfire Response

Mexican radio amateurs provided communication support in late May from a fire scene in a remote area to civil protection authorities in Monterrey, Mexico. Two-member teams of volunteers were flown in via helicopter since May 20, the first day of radio support, when the fire had already been burning for a couple of days. The fire in Pajonal — about 20 kilometers south of Monterrey — covered more than 200 acres in rough terrain. Temperatures topped 100 °F.

Fueled by hot and dry conditions, Mexico’s 2019 fire season has been intense, leading to poor air quality. By mid-May, more than 100 wildfires were active in 17 Mexican states.

Teams had been using Winlink but added the weak-signal software Vara HF, after José Alberto Nieto, EA5HVK, provided a Vara license on short notice. Tom Whiteside, N5TW, in Georgetown, Texas, supported the effort from across the border, aiming his 40- and 20-meter arrays in the direction of the fire in Nuevo Leon. Alfonso Tamez, XE2O, president of Mexico’s IARU member-society Federación Mexicana de Radioexperimentadores (FMRE), was been among the volunteers.

In addition to HF digital traffic, the volunteer teams took advantage of VHF repeaters. HF antennas consisted of a 40-meter dipole for 40 and a steerable portable dipole. A generator is providing electrical power.

The K7RA Solar Update

Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: According to Spaceweather.com, as of June 5 there have been no sunspots for 17 days in a row. Average daily solar flux went to 69.5 for the May 30 – June 5 reporting week from 67.4 in the previous 7 days. The average daily planetary A index declined from 7.3 to 5.6, while the mid-latitude A index dipped from 8.1 to 5.

Last week I suggested that sunspots should return soon, based on the predicted solar flux, but those projections have softened. On June 5 the 45-day predicted solar flux was 70 on June 6 – 13; 72 on June 14 – 16; 71 on June 17; 70 on June 18 – 29; 71 on June 30; 72 on July 1 – 13; 71 on July 14, and 70 on July 15 – 20.

Predicted planetary A index is 5, 8, 10, and 8 on June 6 – 9; 5 on June 10 – 22; 8, 10, 12, and 8 on June 23 – 26; 5 on June 27 – 29; 8 on June 30 – July 2; 5 on July 3 – 4; 8 on July 5 – 6; 5 on July 7 – 19, and 8 on July 20.

Spaceweather.com reported on June 5 that Northern Hemisphere radars were “pinging with activity” from a strong daytime meteor shower.

In Friday’s bulletin, read about recent openings on 10 and 6 meters.

Sunspot numbers for May – June 5, 2019 were 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, and 0, with a mean of 0. The 10.7-centimeter flux was 68.7, 68.7, 69.7, 69.9, 69.8, 70, and 69.8, with a mean of 69.5. Estimated planetary A indices were 8, 5, 4, 4, 5, 8, and 5, with a mean of 5.6. Middle latitude A index was 8, 5, 3, 4, 4, 7, and 4, with a mean of 5.

A comprehensive K7RA Solar Update is posted Fridays on the ARRL website. For more information concerning radio propagation, visit the ARRL Technical Information Service, read “What the Numbers Mean…,” and check out K9LA’s Propagation Page.

A propagation bulletin archive is available. Monthly charts offer propagation projections between the US and a dozen DX locations.

Share your reports and observations.

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Just Ahead in Radiosport

See the ARRL Contest Calendar for more information. For in-depth reporting on Amateur Radio contesting, subscribe to The ARRL Contest Update via your ARRL member profile email preferences.

  • June 7 — HA3NS Sprint Memorial Contest (CW)

  • June 8 — Asia-Pacific Sprint, SSB

  • June 8 – 9 DRCG WW RTTY Contest

  • June 8 – 9 — VK Shires Contest (CW, phone)

  • June 8 – 9 — Portugal Day Contest (CW, phone)

  • June 8 – 9 — SKCC Weekend Sprintathon (CW)

  • June 8 – 9 — GACW WWSA CW DX Contest

  • June 8 – 9 — REF DDFM 6-Meter Contest (CW, phone)

  • June 8 – 10 — ARRL June VHF Contest (CW, phone, digital)

  • June 9 — All Cookie Crumble QRP Contest (CW, phone, digital)

  • June 10 — 4 States QRP Group Second Sunday Sprint (CW, phone)

  • June 10 — RSGB 80-Meter Club Championship (Digital)

  • June 12 — NAQCC CW Sprint (CW)


AMSAT, ARISS Veteran Keith D. Pugh, W5IU, SK

AMSAT and ARISS engineering veteran, Keith Pugh, W5IU, of Fort Worth, Texas, died on May 24. An ARRL Life Member, he was 80.

Born and raised in Dodge City, Kansas, Pugh was licensed in 1953. Amateur Radio strongly influenced his decision to pursue a career in electrical engineering, and he earned a Bachelor of Science in electrical engineering at Kansas State University in 1961. He moved to Texas to work for Convair (later General Dynamics and Lockheed Martin), and, after upgrading to an Amateur Extra-class license, he became W5IU. Pugh retired from Lockheed Martin in 2004 after a career in RADAR and Navigation Systems Engineering.

At Dayton Hamvention®, Pugh volunteered in the AMSAT Booth for many years and frequently headed up the Dayton Hamvention Satellite Demonstration Station.

In the early 1980s, he became interested in ham radio satellites, making contacts on AO-08 and AO-10. He went on to become an AMSAT Area Coordinator and, later served as AMSAT Vice President for Operations.

Pugh jump-started his passion for Amateur Radio on human spaceflight missions in 1991, when the Soviet space station Mirwas in orbit. Pugh joined the Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) team in 2004, where he has provided support as an operations leader, mentoring numerous schools and ARISS contact organizations and attending ARISS International meetings.

ARISS ARRL Representative Rosalie White, K1STO, said Pugh made a difference in his role as an ARISS Technical Mentor for many schools. “ARISS contacts are always exciting and sometimes produce tense moments,” White said. “He touched hundreds of thousands of youth along with all ages of people who had curiosity about ham radio, space, and satellites.”

Yasme Foundation Designates Supporting Grant, Excellence Award Recipients

The Board of Directors of The Yasme Foundation has awarded $5,000 each to the Foundation for Amateur Radio (FAR) and ARRL scholarship programs for 2019, and $5,000 in general support to World Radiosport Team Championship 2022 (WRTC 2022) in Italy and a second grant to sponsor the so-called “Widow’s Ball” during WRTC 2022.

The Yasme Foundation Board also announced recipients of the Yasme Excellence Award. They are:

  • Angel Vazquez, WP3R, for his work in disaster relief, and as an outstanding ambassador for Amateur Radio.

  • Nikola Percin, 9A5W, for his outstanding work in advancing Amateur Radio in Croatia and the surrounding region. He is a cofounder of 9A1A. Percin initiated efforts to recruit young amateurs and established youth programs in coordination with local universities.

The Yasme Excellence Award recognizes individuals and groups who, through their own service, creativity, effort, and dedication, have made significant contributions to Amateur Radio. These may be in recognition of technical, operating, or organizational achievement, as all three are necessary for the growth of Amateur Radio. The Yasme Excellence Award is in the form of a cash grant and an individually engraved crystal globe.

In Brief…

The next Kids Day is Saturday, June 15. That’s the day to get youngsters on the air to share in the joy and fun that Amateur Radio has to offer. Kids Day gets under way at 1800 UTC and concludes at 2359 UTC. Sponsored by the Boring (Oregon) Amateur Radio Club, this event has a simple exchange, suitable for younger operators: first name, age, location, and favorite color. After that, the contact can be as long or as short as each participant prefers. Look for activity on these frequencies: 10 meters: 28.350 – 28.400 MHz; 12 meters: 24.960 – 24.980 MHz; 15 meters: 21.360 – 21.400 MHz; 17 meters: 18.140 – 18.145 MHz; 20 meters: 14.270 – 14.300 MHz; 40 meters: 7.270 – 7.290 MHz, and 80 meters: 3.740 – 3.940 MHz. Repeater contacts are okay with permission of the repeater owner. As with any on-the-air activity that includes unlicensed individuals, control operators must observe third-party traffic restrictionswhen making DX contacts. Additional details are on the ARRL website.

+++

LoTW is now accepting FT4 contacts.The latest TQSL update (Config.xml version 11.8), released on May 22, includes FT4 as a submode of MFSK. It also adds AISAT-1 and PO-101 in the satellite category. As of June 5, more 1 billion contact records have been entered into the system, resulting in 201,492,514 contact confirmations. LoTW has 118,729 users worldwide.

+++

Adafruit Industries Founder Limor Fried, AC2SN, was one of two 2019 Women in Open Source Awardwinners. Sponsored by open-source solution provider Red Hat, the awards honor women who make important contributions to open-source projects and communities, or those making innovative use of open-source methodology. Nominations for this year’s awards were accepted for two categories: “Academic” for those currently enrolled in a college or university, and “Community” for those working on or volunteering with projects related to open source. A panel of judges determined finalists based on nomination criteria, and the public voted to determine the award winners. Fried was recognized in the community category. She is the founder and lead engineer at Adafruit Industries, an open-source hardware company designed to provide a place for people to learn about and purchase open tools, equipment, and electronics online.

+++

Tom Roscoe, K8CX, has posted 361 photos in his Ham Gallery of various Dayton Hamvention®2019 events. Hamvention 2019 hosted the ARRL National Convention. This is Roscoe’s 23rd year of documenting the event, bringing the total to 6,053 Hamvention photos, including this one of ARRL Washington Counsel David Siddall, K3ZJ. Search the entire photo database by entering a call sign. Roscoe also invites photos via email, but at least one ham not already listed on his page must be in the photo, and all hams shown must be identified by call sign. He also accepts Dayton Hamvention photos from past years that meet the same requirements, as well as any “interesting stories or fun moments” from Dayton Hamvention 2019 or forum reviews for his blog.


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The ARRL Letter

The ARRL Letter offers a weekly summary of essential news of interest to active amateurs that is available in advance of publication in QST, our official journal. The ARRL Letterstrives to be timely, accurate, concise and readable.

Much of the ARRL Letter content is also available in audio form in ARRL Audio News.

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Editorial questions or comments: Rick Lindquist, WW1ME, at ww1me@arrl.org.

Plain-Text

The ARRL E-Letter e-mail is also available in plain-text version:

Outlook Express

1. From the Inbox view, select the Tools menu and the Options selection.

2. Click the Read tab

3. Check the Read All Messages In Plain Text box.  When you open the e-mail, it will be in plain text without images. Other e-mail programs may be able to make a Mail Rule for e-mail received from the address memberlist@www.arrl.org so that the plain-text-only display is selected automatically.

Outlook 2007

Use the same procedure as for Outlook Express, although the global option is under “Tools/Trust Center/E-mail Security”.

Thunderbird

Use the menu item “View/Message Body As/Plain Text” or “View/Message Source” options.

OS X Mail (Mac)

Use the “View/Message/Plain Text Alternative” menu item.

GMail

Use the “Message text garbled?” link in the drop-down menu at the upper right of the displayed message block. pine, alpine Set “prefer-plain-text” in your ~/.pinerc configuration file: feature-list=…, prefer-plain-text, …

————

Hawaii Island Amateur/Ham Radio News:

The next meeting of the Big Island Amateur Radio Club will be held on 08 June 2019, 1400 HST, at the Keaau Community Center in Keaau, Hawaii Island.

“Grid Madness 2019,” the Hawaii-based VHF/UHF Simplex Contest, is coming Sunday, 15 September 2019, from 1300 to 1700 HST.  For details, visit this website:  https://gridmadness.blogspot.com.  You can also contact Stan (AH6KO) at ah6ko@arrl.net.

For the latest Amateur/Ham Radio news and information, please check the blog sidebars and links.  These news feeds are updated daily and weekly.  Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russell Roberts (KH6JRM)

Public Information Coordinator

Hawaii County, ARRL Pacific Section

https://bigislandarrlnews.com

The ARRL Letter for April 18, 2019


Welcome to “The ARRL Letter” update from Big Island ARRL News.

Views expressed in this Amateur/Ham Radio news summary are those of the reporters and correspondents.

Content supplied by HQ ARRL, 225 Main Street, Newington, CT. 06111.

Accessed on 19 April 2019, 1745 UTC, Post 941.

Editor:  Rick Lindquist (WW1ME).

Source:

http://www.arrl.org/arrlletter?issue=2019-04-18

Please click link or scroll down to read your selections.


ARRL Headquarters will be Closed on Friday, April 19

ARRL Headquarters will be closed on Friday, April 19. There will be no W1AW bulletin or code practice transmissions on Friday, and no edition of the ARRL Audio News podcast this week. ARRL Headquarters will reopen on Monday, April 22, at 8 AM EDT. We wish everyone a safe and enjoyable holiday weekend.


“Mentoring the Next Generation” is Hamvention and ARRL 2019 National Convention Theme

With an eye toward helping new and inexperienced hams enjoy the full range of activities that Amateur Radio has to offer, Hamvention® and the ARRL 2019 National Convention will embrace the theme of “Mentoring the Next Generation.” Hamvention hosts the National Convention May 17 – 19 at the Greene County Fairgrounds and Expo Center in Xenia, Ohio. This will mark the third year for Hamvention at its new venue. A contingent of ARRL staff and member-volunteers will join forces to make available many ARRL exhibits and resources to Hamvention visitors. The centerpiece of ARRL’s participation will be ARRL EXPO in Building 2. An extensive roster of exhibits and activitiesis available.

Instructors from the ARRL Teachers Institute for Wireless Technology will be on hand to bring wireless and electronics theory to life in hands-on demonstrations and lessons. They’ll also touch on satellite communications, microcontrollers, and the fundamentals of robotics. At a Sunday forum called “Discovering Radio Communications” (10:30 AM – 11:30 AM in Room 2), presenters for the Teachers Institute will highlight a variety of instructional experiences and ideas.

As part of its mentoring focus, ARRL has invited members of the Nashua (New Hampshire) Area Radio Society to Hamvention and ARRL EXPO to share the club’s effective and well-developed outreach program. The ARRL Special Service Club, which boasts more than 200 members and is being recognized as the 2019 Hamvention Club of the Year, caters to radio amateurs of all interests and experience levels. NARS will host an interactive exhibit that may serve as a model for other radio clubs to emulate as well as a Friday forum, “ARRL Spotlight on Radio Clubs and Mentoring” (11:50 AM – 1:05 PM) in Room 3. ARRL-sponsored forums will include:

  • ARRL Laboratory Manager Ed Hare, W1RFI, will present “The ARRL Lab: Trials, Tribulations and (Tall?) Tales,” on Friday (9:15 AM – 10:30 AM) in Room 3.

  • ARRL Great Lakes Director Dale Williams, WA8EFK, will moderate the popular ARRL Forum on Saturday (12 PM – 1:15 PM) in Room 3.

  • ARRL CEO Howard Michel, WB2ITX, will speak on “Engaging Today’s Radio Amateur” on Saturday (1:30 PM – 2:30 PM) in Room 3.

  • Riley Hollingsworth, K4ZDH, a familiar face to many Hamvention visitors from his days with the FCC, will be on hand Sunday (9:15 AM – 10:15 PM) in Room 2 to discuss “ARRL’s New Volunteer Monitor Program and the FCC.”

  • An ARRL Wouff Hong Ceremony will take place Saturday at 9 PM at the Marriott at the University of Dayton (Tradewinds Pavilion), sponsored by the ARRL Ohio Section. The traditional Wouff Hong ceremony is steeped in mystery and represents a tradition that goes back to the early days of ARRL history. Register online.

For more information, see the 2019 ARRL National Convention: Exhibit & Activities Guide. Read more.

♦♦♦

ARRL and FCC Sign Memorandum to Implement New Volunteer Monitor Program

ARRL and the FCC have signed a Memorandum of Understanding(MOU) that paves the way to implement the new and enhanced Volunteer Monitor program. The memorandum establishes the Volunteer Monitors as a replacement for the Official Observers (OO) program. Current OOs have been encouraged to participate in the new program.

Riley Hollingsworth, K4ZDH.

“We are excited by the opportunity to codify our partnership with the FCC and to work together to achieve our mutual interests of protecting the integrity of our Amateur Radio bands,” said ARRL President Rick Roderick, K5UR. “This Memorandum of Understanding will serve as the foundation for a new level of partnership on this very important issue.”

ARRL has contracted with retired FCC special counsel and former Atlantic Division Vice Director Riley Hollingsworth, K4ZDH, to oversee the ARRL’s role in the development and implementation of the Volunteer Monitor program.

Approved by the ARRL Board of Directors at its July 2018 meeting, the new Volunteer Monitor program is a formal agreement between the FCC and ARRL in which volunteers trained and vetted by the ARRL will monitor the airwaves and collect evidence that can be used both to correct misconduct or recognize exemplary on-air operation. Cases of flagrant violations will be referred to the FCC by the ARRL for action in accordance with FCC guidelines.

The intent of this program is to re-energize enforcement efforts in the Amateur Radio bands. It was proposed by the FCC in the wake of several FCC regional office closures and a reduction in field staff.

“Under this program, the FCC will give enforcement priority to cases developed by the Volunteer Monitor program, without the delay of ARRL having to refer cases through the FCC online complaint process,” Hollingsworth said.

Hollingsworth has committed to FCC and ARRL officials to ensure the adequacy of training for the new positions, to review the quality and utility of Volunteer Monitor submissions to the FCC for enforcement actions, and to advocate for rapid disposition of cases appropriately submitted to the FCC.

ARRL officials estimate that the first Volunteer Monitors will be in place and ready to begin their duties within 6 to 9 months. Read more.


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New Tech: FCC Invites Comments on Waiver Request for 24 GHz Wireless Power Transfer Device

The FCC Office of Engineering and Technology (OET) is seeking comments in ET Docket 19-83 on a request by Auspion USA, Inc. to waive the Industrial, Scientific, and Medical (ISM) rules’ “local use” requirement (FCC Part 2 and Part 18 rules) for a 24 GHz wireless power transfer device over distance. On January 3, Auspion requested a waiver of FCC rules to allow it to obtain a grant of equipment authorization for the marketing and operation of a non‑consumer system using transmission of wireless power over distance. Auspion’s “WiPod” system would provide power to, and/or charge, receivers located at various distances from the transmitter.

§18.107(c) of the rules defines ISM devices as “[e]quipment or appliances designed to generate and use [local] RF energy for industrial, scientific, medical, domestic or similar purposes, excluding applications in the field of telecommunication.” Auspion requests that the Commission waive the “local use” condition, as specified in ISM Part 18 rules to allow its system to operate at distances greater than 1 meter between the transmitter and receivers, as long as the transmitted power is directed to very precise locations (called “power spots”) where the receivers are sited. Auspion plans to market its system exclusively for industrial, retail, and enterprise applications, such as charging industrial robots, warehouse-based drones, and smartphones in conference rooms.

Parties should file all comments and reply comments in ET Docket 19-83 using the Commission’s Electronic Comment Filing System (ECFS). Comments are due by April 25, and reply comments are due by May 10.


New Episode of “So Now What?” Podcast

“All About Safety” is the focus of the new (April 18) episode of the So Now What? podcast for Amateur Radio newcomers. If you’re a newly licensed Amateur Radio operator, chances are you have lots of questions. This biweekly podcast has answers! So Now What? offers insights from those who’ve been just where you are now. New episodes will be posted every other Thursday, alternating new-episode weeks with the ARRL The Doctor is In podcast.

So Now What? is sponsored by LDG Electronics, a family owned and operated business with laboratories in southern Maryland that offers a wide array of antenna tuners and other Amateur Radio products.

ARRL Communications Content Producer Michelle Patnode, W3MVP, and W1AW Station Manager Joe Carcia, NJ1Q, co-host the podcast. Presented as a lively conversation, with Patnode representing newer hams and Carcia the veteran operators, the podcast explores questions that newer hams may have and the issues that keep participants from staying active in the hobby. Some episodes will feature guests to answer questions on specific topic areas.

Listeners can find So Now What? on Apple iTunesBlubrryStitcher(free registration required, or browse the site as a guest) and through the free Stitcher app for iOS, Kindle, or Android devices. Episodes will be archived on the ARRL website.

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Hamvention Opening Gates to All on Final Day of 2019 Show

Hamvention® has announced that it will open the gates to all, without charge, on Sunday, May 19, the final day of the annual gathering at Greene County Fairgrounds and Expo Center in Xenia, Ohio. Hamvention 2019 General Chair Jack Gerbs, WB8SCT, said the idea is to encourage the curious to see what attracts some 30,000 visitors to Hamvention each spring.

Hamvention General Chair Jack Gerbs, WB8SCT.

“This will make it a little easier and cheaper for someone with just a little interest in Hamvention to see what all the excitement is about,” Gerbs said.

In addition to the features and equipment that attract radio amateurs, non-ham visitors will get to see vendors selling a variety of other electronic equipment, including computers and accessories, security devices, networking supplies, tools, and other items of interest to the general public. Those visiting the flea market area may be surprised at what’s available, often at a small fraction of its original cost.

Gerbs pointed out that Sunday is Hamvention’s lightest traffic day, making it convenient for anyone who just wants check out what’s there. Hamvention will be open on Sunday from 9 AM until 1 PM.

Greene County Sheriff Gene Fischer, KX8GCS, has arranged to make text alerts possible again this year for those wanting up-to-the-minute mobile phone alerts regarding weather, traffic, parking, and other useful information affecting the event. Text “Hamvention19” to 888777 to sign up. Those who signed up for the text alerts in 2018 already are registered for this year’s event.

The text alerts supplement the Hamvention talk-in station that has operated for many years on the Dayton Amateur Radio Association 146.94 repeater (123.0 Hz tone) to give directions and other assistance. Read more.

Registration Opens for USA ARDF Championships

Registration is now open for the 2019 USA and IARU Region 2 Championships of Amateur Radio Direction Finding (ARDF), set for August 1 – 4. Competition venues will be near Raleigh, North Carolina.

“The USA ARDF Championships are an ideal opportunity to watch and learn from the best radio-orienteers in the US and from around the world, because visiting competitors from numerous other countries are expected to attend,” said ARRL ARDF Coordinator Joe Moell, K0OV. “Winners who qualify by citizenship or residence may be selected for positions on ARDF Team USA, which will travel to Serbia for the 2020 ARDF World Championships.”

Thursday, August 1, will be devoted to the foxoring championship. Foxoring is a combination of radio direction finding and classic orienteering. Friday morning will be the sprint, a short course with 12-second fox transmissions instead of the usual 60 seconds each, followed by a model event for equipment testing and a competitor briefing.

Classic 2-meter and 80-meter competitions will take place Saturday and Sunday, respectively. An awards banquet on Saturday evening will include presentation of medals for foxoring, sprint, and 2-meter classic events; awards for 80-meter classic will be given out on Sunday afternoon immediately after the competition.

Members of the Backwoods Orienteering Klub (BOK) will organize the 2019 USA and IARU Region 2 Championships. The International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) sets ARDF Championship rules. For scoring and awards, participants are divided into 11 age/gender categories.

The USA ARDF Championships are open to anyone who can safely navigate the woods by themselves. A ham radio license is not required. Each participant competes as an individual — any teamwork or GPS use is forbidden.

Information bulletin #2 contains the complete schedule, technical details, lodging, T-shirts, fees, rule variations, and more. Bulletins and links for online registration are on the event web page on the BOK site. An email reflector is available for Q&A with the organizers as well as for coordinating transportation and arranging equipment loans.

Basic information on international-style transmitter hunting is on the “Homing In” radio direction finding website. Read more— Thanks to Joe Moell, K0OV

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Just Ahead in Radiosport
  • April 19 – 20 — Holyland DX Contest (CW, phone, digital)

  • April 20 — ES Open HF Championship (CW, phone)

  • April 20 — QRP to the Field (CW, phone)

  • April 20 — Feld Hell Sprint

  • April 20 – 21 — Worked All Provinces of China DX Contest (CW, phone)

  • April 20 – 21 — YU DX Contest (CW, phone)

  • April 20 – 21 — CQMM DX Contest (CW)

  • April 20 – 21 — Nebraska QSO Party (CW, phone, digital)

  • April 20 – 21 — Michigan QSO Party (CW, phone)

  • April 20 – 21 — EA-QRP CW Contest (CW)

  • April 20 – 21 — Ontario QSO Party (CW, phone)

  • April 22 — Run for the Bacon QRP Contest (CW)

  • April 24 — SKCC Sprint (CW)

  • April 24 — 432 MHz Spring Sprint (CW, phone)

  • April 24 — UKEICC 80-Meter Contest (CW)

  • April 25 — RSGB 80-Meter Club Championship (Digital)

See the ARRL Contest Calendar for more information. For in-depth reporting on Amateur Radio contesting, subscribe to The ARRL Contest Update via your ARRL member profile email preferences.

The K7RA Solar Update

Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: New sunspot group 2739 appeared on April 17, and the daily sunspot number rose to 24. The new sunspot’s polarity indicates that it’s still part of Cycle 24, the current sunspot cycle. This reporting week (April 11 – 17) the average daily sunspot number rose from 6.9 to 14, while average daily solar flux increased from 75.4 to 76.4.

Geomagnetic indicators were quieter, with the average planetary A index declining from 10.6 to 6.4.

Predicted solar flux for the next 45 days is 76, 74, and 72 on April 18 – 20; 70 on April 21 – 23; 68 on April 24; 69 on April 25 – 26; 70 and 69 on April 27 – 28; 71 on April 29 – 30; 70 on May 1; 72 on May 2 – 3; 77 on May 4; 79 on May 5 – 6; 78, 79, and 77 on May 7 – 9; 78 on May 10 – 17; 71 on May 18 – 19; 69 and 68 on May 20 – 21; 69 on May 22 – 23; 70 and 69 on May 24 – 25; 71 on May 26 – 27; 70 on May 28; 72 on May 29 – 30, and 77 and 79 on May 31 – June 1.

Predicted planetary A index is 5 on April 18 – 26; 10, 8, and 5 on April 27 – 29; 10 on April 30 – May 2; 7, 5, and 13 on May 3 – 5; 10, 14, and 7 on May 6 – 8; 8 on May 9 – 10; 5 on May 11 – 20; 10, 8, and 5 on May 21 – 23; 10, 8, and 5 on May 24 – 26; 10 on May 27 – 29, and 7, 5, and 13 on May 30 – June 1.

Jon, N0JK, reports that summer sporadic-E season began on April 14, when he copied K2PL and KE3QZ in Kansas on 6 meters.

Sunspot numbers for April 11 – 17 were 13, 14, 14, 11, 11, 11, and 24, with a mean of 14. The 10.7-centimeter flux was 78.5, 77.3, 77.9, 75.4, 75.4, 74.2, and 76.1, with a mean of 76.4. Estimated planetary A indices were 7, 9, 8, 4, 8, 6, and 3, with a mean of 6.4. Middle latitude A index was 6, 7, 7, 3, 8, 6, and 3, with a mean of 5.7.

A comprehensive K7RA Solar Update is posted Fridays on the ARRL website. For more information concerning radio propagation, visit the ARRL Technical Information Service, read “What the Numbers Mean…,” and check out K9LA’s Propagation Page.

A propagation bulletin archive is available. Monthly charts offer propagation projections between the US and a dozen DX locations.

Share your reports and observations.

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ARRL Foundation Announces Dick Hanna, K3VYY, Memorial Scholarship

The ARRL Foundation has announced the Dick Hanna, K3VYY, Memorial Scholarship. Created through the generosity of the Hanna Family in memory of J. Richard “Dick” Hanna, K3VYY, of Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania, this scholarship is intended exclusively for educational use, to provide assistance with the cost of tuition, room, board, books, and/or other fees essential to the higher education of the recipient. Preference is given to applicants residing in western Pennsylvania or in eastern Kentucky.

The applicant must:

  • be a US citizen, but without regard to gender, race, national origin, handicap status, or any other factor.

  • be performing at a high academic level (grade point average of 3.0 or higher).

  • hold a valid FCC-issued Amateur Radio license, with preference given to applicants holding a General-class license or higher.

  • be enrolled in an accredited 4-year college or university and pursuing a degree in a science-, math-, engineering-, or technology-related field, or in an accredited program in aviation or fire science.

Dick Hanna, K3VYY.

The grant will be $1,000 annually, with the first scholarship expected to be awarded in 2020. The ARRL Foundation Board of Directors will disperse the scholarship funds to the recipient’s school of choice. Scholarships are for the exclusive use of the recipient.

Hanna was first licensed in 1962 as KN3SVL. He died in 2017. Survivors include his wife Pamela, WB3BHJ, and sons Doug, N4YKQ, and Brian, KF7ORO.

Including the new Hanna scholarship, the Foundation will be awarding 98 scholarships from 77 funds in 2020, totaling $142,650.

Astronaut and Pioneer for Amateur Radio in Space Owen Garriott, W5LFL, SK

Owen K. Garriott, W5LFL, the US astronaut who pioneered the use of Amateur Radio to make contacts from space, died April 15 at his home in Huntsville, Alabama. He was 88. Garriott’s ham radio activity ushered in the formal establishment of Amateur Radio in space, first as SAREX (the Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment), and later as ARISS(Amateur Radio on the International Space Station).

“Owen inspired legions of Amateur Radio operators worldwide to support human spaceflight Amateur Radio endeavors and for countless individuals to become ham radio operators,” observed ARISS-International President Frank Bauer, KA3HDO.

Garriott, an Oklahoma native, thrilled radio amateurs around the world by making the first contacts from space during 10 days aboard Spacelab-1 during a 1983 Space Shuttle Columbia mission. Thousands of hams listened on 2-meter FM, hoping to hear him or to make a contact. Garriott ended up contacting stations around the globe, among them such notables as the late King Hussein, JY1, of Jordan, and the late US Senator Barry Goldwater, K7UGA.

“I managed to do it in my off-duty hours, and it was a pleasure to get involved in it and to talk with people who are as interested in space as the 100,000 hams on the ground seemed to be,” Garriott recounted during an interview published in the February 1984 edition of QST.

Garriott simply used a handheld transceiver with its antenna in the window of Spacelab-1. His first pass was down the US West Coast.

“[A]s I approached the US, I began to hear stations that were trying to reach me,” he told QST. “On my very first CQ, there were plenty of stations responding.” His first contact was with Lance Collister, WA1JXN, in Montana.

Garriott shared a Hamvention Special Achievement Award in 2002 with fellow Amateur Radio astronaut Tony England, W0ORE. His son, Richard Garriott, W5KWQ, was a private space traveler to the ISS, flown there by the Russian Federal Space Agency, and he also carried ham radio into space.

In Brief…

ARRL has rolled back Outgoing QSL Bureau rates to 2011 levels. Effective May 15, 2019, the new rates will be: $2 for 10 or fewer cards in one envelope; $3 for 11 – 20 cards in one envelope, or 75 cents per ounce for packages with 21 or more cards. For example, a package containing 1.5 pounds of cards — 24 ounces, or about 225 cards — will cost $18. There are no transaction service fees. Any cards received before May 15 will be charged the current rate. There will be no adjustments for cards received before May 15. More information is on the ARRL website.

♦♦♦

A new billboard on Interstate 40 in Tennessee promotes ARRL and Amateur Radio. Working with ARRL Product Development Manager Bob Inderbitzen, NQ1R, and Communications Manager Dave Isgur, N1RSN, ARRL Graphic Designer Sue Fagan, KB1OKW, completed a design for a new 10 × 20 billboard, owned by ARRL Life Member Cliff Segar, KD4GT. Segar says the average daily traffic count for the area along I-40 west bound, mile marker 336, is on the order of 6 million vehicles per year.

♦♦♦

American Honda has announced a voluntary recall of some 200,000 portable generators sold in the US, due to a potential fire and burn hazard. The recall includes the EU2200i, EU2200i Companion, and EB2200i generators. The US Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) says the affected portable generators can leak gasoline from the fuel valve. Users should stop operating the recalled generator and contact an authorized Honda dealer for a free repair. Honda is also contacting users directly. For more information, visit the CPSC website. A similar recall has been issued in Canada.


Getting It Right

The item “FCC Agrees to 90-Day Pause in Consideration of WT Docket 16-239” in the April 11 edition of The ARRL Letter contained an error. It should have said, “The Commission’s proposed changes differed from the ARRL’s initial filing and caused ARRL to be concerned about possible interference to current users resulting from the deletion of ARRL’s requested 2.8 kHz bandwidth limitation.”


Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions

Find conventions and hamfests in your area.


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The ARRL Letter

The ARRL Letter offers a weekly summary of essential news of interest to active amateurs that is available in advance of publication in QST, our official journal. The ARRL Letterstrives to be timely, accurate, concise and readable.

Much of the ARRL Letter content is also available in audio form in ARRL Audio News.

Material from The ARRL Letter may be republished or reproduced in whole or in part in any form without additional permission. Credit must be given to The ARRL Letter and The American Radio Relay League.

Back issues published since 2000 are available on this page. If you wish to subscribe via e-mail, simply log on to the ARRL Web site, click on Edit Your Profile at the top, then click on Edit Email Subscriptions. Check the box next to The ARRL email newsletter, the ARRL Letter and you will receive each weekly issue in HTML format. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Delivery problems (ARRL member direct delivery only!): letter-dlvy@arrl.org

Editorial questions or comments: Rick Lindquist, WW1ME, at ww1me@arrl.org.

Plain-Text

The ARRL E-Letter e-mail is also available in plain-text version:

Outlook Express

1. From the Inbox view, select the Tools menu and the Options selection.

2. Click the Read tab

3. Check the Read All Messages In Plain Text box.  When you open the e-mail, it will be in plain text without images. Other e-mail programs may be able to make a Mail Rule for e-mail received from the address memberlist@www.arrl.org so that the plain-text-only display is selected automatically.

Outlook 2007

Use the same procedure as for Outlook Express, although the global option is under “Tools/Trust Center/E-mail Security”.

Thunderbird

Use the menu item “View/Message Body As/Plain Text” or “View/Message Source” options.

OS X Mail (Mac)

Use the “View/Message/Plain Text Alternative” menu item.

GMail

Use the “Message text garbled?” link in the drop-down menu at the upper right of the displayed message block. pine, alpine Set “prefer-plain-text” in your ~/.pinerc configuration file: feature-list=…, prefer-plain-text, …

The ARRL ARES E-Letter and the ARRL Contest Update, 20 Feb 2019


Welcome to an update of Amateur/Ham Radio News from “Big Island ARRL News.”

This post contains topics from the current ARRL ARES E-Letter and the ARRL Contest Update.

Views expressed in this Amateur/Ham Radio news summary are those of the reporters and correspondents.

Content provided by HQ ARRL, Newington, CT, 06111.

Accessed on 21 February 2019, 0305 UTC, Post 875.

Source:  http://www.arrl.org/ares-el?issue=2019-02-20

We begin with a look at the top stories from The ARRL ARES E-Letter.

Editor:  Rick Palm (K1CE).

Here are the top stories covered in the current issue of The ARES E-Letter, 20 February 2019:

ARES Briefs, Links

Cuban Amateurs Respond to Severe Tornado — On January 27, radio amateurs in Cuba’s capital of Havana were keeping an eye on the weather. With a low-pressure system in the Gulf of Mexico and cold front approaching, severe weather resulted with conditions that deteriorated during the evening and night hours. An F4 tornado hit Havana, the first tornado ever to hit the city. “Once again, Amateur Radio operators proved how they could handle emergency traffic during the severe weather event, when the 2G and 3G mobile cellular phone systems collapsed due to damage and the excessive traffic generated by the incident,” Radio Havana’s Arnie Coro, CO2KK, reported. More here.


Now, we turn our attention to the current issue of The ARRL Contest Update.

Views expressed in this Amateur/Ham Radio News summary are those of the reporters and correspondents.

Content provided by HQ ARRL, Newington, CT, 06111.

Accessed on 21 February 2019, 0305 UTC, Post 875.

Source:  http://www.arrl.org/contest-update-issues?issue=2019-02-20

Editor:  Brian Moran (N9ADG).

Here are the top stories covered in the current issue of The ARRL Contest Update, 20 February 2019:

N THIS ISSUE

For the latest Amateur/Ham Radio news and information, please check the blog sidebars and links. These news feeds are updated daily and weekly.

Aloha es 73 de

Russell Roberts (KH6JRM)

Public Information Coordinator

Hawaii County, ARRL Pacific Section

https://bigislandarrlnews.com

 

 

ARLD051 DX news, 14 Dec 2018


Accessed on 14 December 2018, 1544 UTC, Post 803.

Source:

Email message from W1AW and HQ ARRL, Newington, CT, 06111.

Here’s the latest DX Bulletin from W1AW and HQ ARRL:

“SB DX @ ARL $ARLD051
ARLD051 DX news

ZCZC AE51
QST de W1AW
DX Bulletin 51  ARLD051
From ARRL Headquarters
Newington CT  December 13, 2018
To all radio amateurs

SB DX ARL ARLD051
ARLD051 DX news

This week’s bulletin was made possible with information provided by
The Daily DX, the OPDX Bulletin, 425 DX News, DXNL, Contest Corral
from QST and the ARRL Contest Calendar and WA7BNM web sites.  Thanks
to all.

GHANA, 9G.  Kay, 9G5SA is usually QRV as 9G2HO from the club station
at Ho Technical University.  Activity of late has been on 17 meters.
QSL via LoTW.

ANTARCTICA.  Felix, DL5XL is QRV as DP1POL from station Neumayer
III, IOTA AN-016, until the end of February 2019.  Activity is on
the HF bands using mostly CW and various digital modes.  QSL via
DL1ZBO.

PALESTINE, E4.  Elvira, IV3FSG is QRV as E44YL from Bethlehem until
December 18.  Activity is on 80 to 10 meters, and possibly 160
meters, using CW, SSB, RTTY, PSK and FT8.  QSL via IK3GES.

SOUTH COOK ISLANDS, E5.  Milan, OK1DWC is QRV as E51DWC from
Rarotonga, IOTA OC-013.  Activity is on 160 to 10 meters using CW,
SSB and RTTY.  QSL to home call.

NEW CALEDONIA, FK.  Phil, F6OBD will be QRV as FK/F6OBD from
December 18 to February 10, 2019.  Activity will be holiday style on
the various HF bands using various digital modes.  QSL to home call.

THAILAND, HS.  Erich, HB9FIH is QRV as HS0ZLS near Pattaya and Koh
Samui, IOTA AS-101, until January 10, 2019.  Activity is on the HF
bands using CW, some SSB, and various digital modes.  QSL to home
call.  In addition, special event station HS18NBTC is QRV until
December 16 to celebrate Thailand Amateur Radio Day.  QSL via
bureau.

OGASAWARA, JD1.  Harry, JG7PSJ will be QRV as JD1BMH from Chichijima
Island, IOTA AS-031, from December 17 to January 2, 2019.  Activity
will be on the HF bands using CW, SSB and RTTY.  QSL direct to home
call.

GREENLAND, OX.  Station OX/SM3UQK is QRV until December 19 from
Constable Point, Nerlerit Inaat.  Activity is on 40 and 20 meters.
QSL to home call.

DENMARK, OZ.  Frank, 5P2BA is QRV with Santa Claus call sign XP1SC
until January 6.  QSL via OZ2CBA.

ARUBA, P4.  Ben, DL6RAI is QRV as P4/DL6RAI until December 27.
Activity is holiday style on the low bands, with a focus on CW, and
some part-time activities in various contests.  QSL via LoTW.

SLOVENIA, S5.  Members of radio club S59DCD are QRV as S511PMC to
call attention to the World Wide Peace Messenger City Contest to be
held January 5 and 6, 2019.  QSL via bureau.

GABON, TR.  Roland, F8EN will be QRV as TR8CR beginning December 16
and here for 3 months.  Activity will be on 40 to 17 meters, and
possibly 80 meters, using CW and SSB.  QSL via F6AJA.

ROMANIA, YO.  Nine Santa Claus stations are QRV as YP2XMAS through
YP0XMAS during December from various locations.  Activity is on the
HF bands using CW, SSB and various digital modes.  QSL via
operators’ instructions.

KOSOVO, Z6.  Philipp, DK6SP, Tomi, HA8RT, Flo, OE3FTA and Horia,
YO3IMD are QRV as Z66DH from Pristina until December 22.  Activity
is on all HF bands using CW, SSB and various digital modes,
including FT8 in DXpedition mode.  QSL direct to M0SDV.

SOUTH SUDAN, Z8.  Diya, YI1DZ is here for another six months and
will be QRV as Z81D.  Activity is on 80 to 10 meters using SSB and
various digital modes in his spare time.  QSL via OM3JW.

THIS WEEKEND ON THE RADIO. The ARRL CW Rookie Roundup, NCCC RTTY
Sprint, QRP 80-Meter CW Fox Hunt, NCCC CW Sprint, UN DIGI Contest,
Russian 160-Meter Contest, Feld Hell Sprint, OK DX RTTY Contest,
Padang DX SSB Contest and Croatian CW Contest are all on tap for
this weekend.

The Run for the Bacon QRP CW Contest is scheduled for December 17.

The CWops Mini-CWT Test, QRP 40-Meter CW Fox Hunt, Phone Fray and
NAQCC CW Sprint are scheduled for December 19.

Youth On The Air runs during all of December.

The ARRL International Grid Chase runs during all of 2018.

Please see December QST, page 70, and the ARRL and WA7BNM Contest
Web Sites for details.
NNNN
/EX”


Hawaii Island Amateur/Ham Radio notes:

The Big Island of Hawaii International Swap Meet/Ham Fest is set for

Saturday, 02 February 2019, at the Waimea Community Center.  The

event is open to the public between 0930 HST and 1400 HST.  The

program features a swap meet, vendor tables, an EMCOMM forum,

and VE testing for new and upgraded amateur radio licenses. For

details, contact Steve Milner (WH6N) at wh6n@arrl.net.


Alan (AD6E/KH6TU) begins another online CW class in January 2019.

According to Alan, “This is an on-line video chat meeting twice a week

for eight weeks, most likely on Monday and Thursday at 6 pm HST

for an hour each.”  Sign up here:

https://cwops.org/cw-academy-2/cw-academy-student-sign-up/


For the latest Amateur/Ham Radio news and information, please check

the blog sidebars and links.  These news feeds are updated daily and

weekly.

Aloha es 73 de

Russell Roberts (KH6JRM)

Public Information Coordinator

Hawaii County, ARRL Pacific Section

https://bigislandarrlnews.com