Tag Archives: ARRL Field Day

2019 ARRL Field Day “Thank You” 06/25/2019


Welcome to a “Hawaii Amateur/Ham Radio News” update from Big Island ARRL News.

Views expressed in this Amateur/Ham Radio news summary are those of the reporters and correspondents.

Content, including text, photos, images, and video, provided by Darren Holbrook (KH6OWL).

Accessed on 25 June 2019, 2145 UTC, Post 1018.

Source:  https://hamradiohawaii.wordpress.com.

Now that the 2019 edition of the ARRL Field Day is over, it’s time to reflect on that event and to thank those supporting radio amateur efforts to enhance  operating skills during emergency situations.  Field Day has many unsung “heroes” who helped us achieve the successes of that day.

Such is the sentiment expressed by Darren Holbrook (KH6OWL) who publishes the popular Oahu Amateur Radio website:  “Ham Radio Hawaii” (https://hamradiohawaii.wordpress.com).  I’ve taken the liberty to publish his remarks from the 24 June 2019 edition of “Ham Radio Hawaii.”  May we all be grateful for the support we receive from friends, family, and our public-served agencies.

“2019 Field Day is Over – Time to say “Thank you”.

Extra Extra! Read All About Ham Radio!

The radios are put away, the antennas are down and the 2019 Field day is in the books, if you have logged all your contacts that is.

All the behind the scenes work that was completed deserves a thank you to all that made it possible. From coordinating the sites, the many volunteers that set-up, those who volunteered their radios, antennas and generators. Those are just a few items that you may  have noticed. But what about all the other things? The people who cooked, brought in all the food, paper plates, cups, ice, coolers, tables and chairs. The family members that volunteered their time to be there for the operator.

All the things that goes into field day happened because others love to support the clubs, friends & families. The next time you see your club board or your friends who help organize this event, just say Thank you. It will mean a lot to them and they deserve it.

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For the latest Amateur/Ham Radio news and information, please check the blog sidebars and links. These news feeds are updated daily and weekly.  Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russell Roberts (KH6JRM)

Public Information Coordinator

Hawaii County, ARRL Pacific Section

https://bigislandarrlnews.com

 

 

ARLD025 DX news-Propagation de K7RA


Here is the latest ARRL DX News from Big Island ARRL News.

Views expressed in this Amateur/Ham Radio News summary are those of the reporters and correspondents.

Content, including text, photos, images, and video, provided by HQ ARRL, 225 Main Street, Newington, CT, 06111.

Accessed on 22 June 2019, 0325 UTC, Post 1014.

Source:  HQ ARRL and W1AW.

Here is the complete DX bulletin as transmitted by W1AW:

SB DX @ ARL $ARLD025
ARLD025 DX news

ZCZC AE25
QST de W1AW
DX Bulletin 25  ARLD025
From ARRL Headquarters
Newington CT  June 20, 2019
To all radio amateurs

SB DX ARL ARLD025
ARLD025 DX news

This week’s bulletin was made possible with information provided by
AD8J, The Daily DX, The OPDX Bulletin, 425 DX News, DXNL, Contest
Corral from QST and the ARRL Contest Calendar and WA7BNM web sites.
Thanks to all.

SRI LANKA, 4S.  Kamal, 4S7AB has been QRV using FT8 on 6 meters.
QSL direct to home call.

BELARUS, EW.  Sixteen special event stations are using the EV19
prefix until June 30 to mark the 2nd European Games being held in
Minsk.  Stations EV0CA, EV0MA and EV0SD represent the sports venues.
QSL via operators’ instructions.

FRANCE, F.  Special event station TM57FFC will be QRV from June 23
to July 9 during the 8th FIFA Women’s World Cup.  QSL via bureau.

HONDURAS, HR.  John, AD8J will be QRV as HR9/AD8J from Guanaja
Island, IOTA NA-057, from June 22 to July 6.  Activity will be
holiday style on 80 to 10 meters using CW, SSB and FT8.  QSL direct
to home call.

JAPAN, JA.  Special event station 8J8HAM is QRV until September 22
to mark the 6th Hokkaido HAM Fair.  QSL via bureau.

OGASAWARA, JD1.  Operators JA2GQT, JA2KGT and JA2MET are QRV as
JD1BPK, JD1BPL and JD1BMG, respectively, until June 23.  Activity is
on 40, 30, 20 and 6 meters using CW, SSB and FT8.  QSL to home
calls.

SABA, ST. EUSTATIUS, PJ5.  Dave, W9DR will be QRV as PJ5/W9DR from
Sint Eustatius from June 25 to July 2.  Activity will be on 6 meters
only using SSB.  QSL direct to home call.

PALAU, T8.  Nobuaki, JA0JHQ is QRV as T88PB from Koror City until
June 23.  Activity is on 160 to 6 meters using CW and FT8.  QSL via
LoTW.

EUROPEAN RUSSIA, UA.  A group of operators will be QRV as R3ARS/4
from specially protected natural areas in the Orenburg and Samara
regions from June 24 to 29.  Activity will be on 80 to 10 meters
using CW, SSB and various digital modes.  QSL via RA3AKF.

MICRONESIA, V6.  Shuji, JA1FMN is QRV as V63PSK from Weno Island,
IOTA OC-011, until June 22.  Activity is holiday style on 80 to 6
meters using JT65, FT8 and FT4.  QSL direct to home call.

CANADA, VE.  Special event station XN1M is QRV until July 21 to
commemorate the 1969 Apollo 11 mission.  QSL via VO1IDX.

LAOS, XW.  Bruce, 3W3B will be QRV as XW4XR from Vientiane from June
26 to July 7.  Activity will be on 40 to 6 meters, including 60
meters, using CW, RTTY, JT65 and FT8.  QSL via E21EIC.

SOUTH SUDAN, Z8.  Diya, YI1DZ is QRV as Z81D and plans to be active
from Juba after June 22.  Activity will be in his spare time on 80
to 10 meters using SSB and various digital modes.  QSL via OM3JW.

CAYMAN ISLANDS, ZF.  Kan, JJ2RCJ will be QRV as ZF2CJ from Grand
Cayman Island, IOTA NA-016, from June 23 to 25.  Activity will be on
80 to 10 meters using FT8.  QSL direct to home call.

OPERATIONS APPROVED FOR DXCC CREDIT.  The following operations are
approved for DXCC credit:  Conway Reef, 3D2CR, 2019 operation; Niue,
E6ET, 2019 operation.

THIS WEEKEND ON THE RADIO.  ARRL Field Day, NCCC RTTY Sprint, NCCC
CW Sprint, Ukrainian DX DIGI Contest and His Majesty King of Spain
SSB Contest are all on tap for this upcoming weekend.

The QCX CW Challenge is scheduled for June 24.

The CWops Mini-CWT Test, SKCC CW Sprint and Phone Fray are scheduled
for June 26.

The Canadian National Parks on the Air, CNPOTA, operating event runs
for the entire year of 2019, with special stations active from
Canada’s parks and historic sites.

Please see June QST, page 86, and the ARRL and WA7BNM Contest Web
Sites for details.
NNNN
/EX


Propagation de K7RA

Here’s the latest propagation forecast from Tad Cook (K7RA).

Content, including text, photos, images, and video, provided by Tad Cook (K7RA), W1AW, and HQ ARRL, 225 Main Street, Newington, CT, 06111.

Here’s the complete propagation forecast from Tad Cook (K7RA):

ZCZC AP25
QST de W1AW
Propagation Forecast Bulletin 25  ARLP025
From Tad Cook, K7RA
Seattle, WA  June 21, 2019
To all radio amateurs

SB PROP ARL ARLP025
ARLP025 Propagation de K7RA

The quiet Sun continues, with still another week passing with zero
sunspots. For 33 days in a row, no sunspot activity, as of Thursday,
June 20. So far this year 62% of the days are without sunspots,
really the same as all of last year, which was 61%.

Average daily solar flux over the past week was 67.1, down from 69
last week and 69.5 the week before.

Predicted solar flux over the next 45 days is 67 on June 21-28, 69
on June 29 through July 4, 68 on July 5-6, 69 on July 7-9, 68 on
July 10-11, 67 and 66 on July 12-13, 67 on July 14-20, 68 on July
21-24, 69 on July 25-31, 68 on August 1-2, and 69 on August 3-4.

Predicted planetary A index is 5 on June 21-23, 10 and 8 on June
24-25, 5 on June 26 through July 5, 8 on July 6, 5 on July 7-9, 8 on
July 10-11, 5 and 8 on July 12-13, 12 on July 14-17, 10, 8, 5, 8, 12
and 8 on July 18-23, and 5 on July 24 through August 1, then 8, 5
and 5 on August 2-4.

The Summer Solstice occurs at 11:54 AM EDT on Friday, June 21. And
of course, the next day is ARRL Field Day. The low predicted
planetary A index over Field Day weekend is a welcome sign, with
little chance of any geomagnetic disturbance.

Geomagnetic activity forecast for the period June 21 to July 17,
2019 from F.K. Janda, OK1HH, who sees slightly more active
geomagnetic conditions on Field Day weekend.

“Geomagnetic field will be:
Quiet on June 27, 30, July 9
Quiet to unsettled on June 22, 28-29, July 3, 8, 10-11, 13-17
Quiet to active on June 21, 23, 26, July 1-2, 4-5, 12
Unsettled to active on June 24-25, July (6- ) 7
No disturbed days predicted.

“Solar wind will intensify on June (23) 24-27, (28,) July 5-7,
(8-9,) 10-11.

“Parenthesis means lower probability of activity enhancement.”

Martin McCormick, WB5AGZ commented that he doesn’t think the solar
flux has ever been below 66, where it was a few days ago, so we must
be at solar minimum. But I pointed out that if you look at page 11
in this Preliminary Report and Forecast, it shows predicted flux
values going even lower:

ftp://ftp.swpc.noaa.gov/pub/warehouse/2019/WeeklyPDF/prf2283.pdf

But I don’t believe those numbers. I don’t see how it is possible
that solar flux will go below 60 in 2021 and 2022. I keep checking
at the beginning of every month, waiting for this prediction to be
corrected, but so far haven’t seen it.

Rich Zwirko, K1HTV and Steve, NN4X reported a transatlantic 2 meter
contact by D41CV:

https://bit.ly/2RstTcP

An article about Europe’s L5 project, and what it means for space
weather forecasting:

https://bit.ly/2L4thc7

Dr. Tamitha Skov’s most recent video can be found at:

https://youtu.be/F5Wa6bXGy_I

If you would like to make a comment or have a tip for our readers,
email the author at, k7ra@arrl.net.

For more information concerning radio propagation, see the ARRL
Technical Information Service web page at,
http://arrl.org/propagation-of-rf-signals. For an explanation of
numbers used in this bulletin, see http://arrl.org/the-sun
-the-earth-the-ionosphere.

An archive of past propagation bulletins is at
http://arrl.org/w1aw-bulletins-archive-propagation. More good
information and tutorials on propagation are at http://k9la.us/.

Monthly propagation charts between four USA regions and twelve
overseas locations are at http://arrl.org/propagation.

Instructions for starting or ending email distribution of ARRL
bulletins are at http://arrl.org/bulletins.

Sunspot numbers for June 13 through 19, 2019 were 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0,
and 0, with a mean of 0. 10.7 cm flux was 67.5, 68, 66.7, 65.9,
66.3, 67, and 68, with a mean of 67.1. Estimated planetary A indices
were 10, 8, 4, 4, 3, 4, and 4, with a mean of 5.3. Middle latitude A
index was 12, 13, 6, 6, 5, 3, and 4, with a mean of 7.
NNNN
/EX

Attachments area
Preview YouTube video All Quiet at Earth, New Crater on a Stormy Mars: Solar Storm Forecast 06-20-2019

The ARRL Letter for June 20, 2019


Welcome to “The ARRL Letter” update from Big Island ARRL News.

Views expressed in this Amateur/Ham Radio News summary are those of the reporters and correspondents.

Content, including text, photos, images, and video, provided by HQ ARRL, 225 Main Street, Newington, CT, 06111.

Accessed on 21 June 2019, 1525 UTC, Post 1013.

Source:

http://www.arrl.org/arrlletter?issue-2019-06-20.

Editor: Rick Lindquist (WW1ME).

Please scroll down to read your selections.


Internet Access to some ARRL Systems May Be Disrupted on June 23

Maintenance work on Sunday, June 23, may disrupt internet access to ARRL Headquarters systems — including VPN connections and Logbook of The World. The main website should remain online during this outage, which could last for up to 6 hours on June 23, which will start at approximately midnight EDT (0400 UTC on June 24). All services will automatically resume as soon as connectivity is restored. Email should not be affected. Any orders placed via the ARRL Store during the outage will be queued for handling after connectivity returns. We apologize for any inconvenience.


ARRL Executive Committee Establishes Ad Hoc Committee on Communications

Meeting right after Dayton Hamvention® at the University of Dayton on May 20, the ARRL Board’s Executive Committee (EC) adopted a motion to establish an Ad Hoc Committee on Communications with ARRL Members. The panel would review ARRL communications with members and members’ perceptions to “consider areas needing enhancement,” and it would “propose concrete changes in communication processes and methods by which improvements may be accomplished,” according to the resolution. ARRL Vice President Greg Widin, K0GW, will chair the committee.

In his remarks to the EC, President Rick Roderick, K5UR, said he’s been receiving positive feedback from members. He also reported receiving numerous questions regarding the Amateur Radio Parity Act. He stressed that ARRL needs to assure members that it has not given up on the initiative, which was put on hold earlier this year. At the same meeting, ARRL Pacific Division Director Jim Tiemstra, K6JAT, updated the EC on efforts to reassess the Amateur Radio Parity Act. He said the Board’s Legislative Committee is working on a plan of action to go before the full Board at its July meeting.

President Roderick, who chaired the EC meeting, said he remains concerned that Technician licensees, who make up more than half of the US Amateur Radio population, only comprise some 16% of ARRL members.

The EC referred to the Administration and Finance (A&F) Committee for its consideration of a suggested graduated ARRL Life Membership dues reduction after an individual has reached a certain age. The EC asked the A&F Committee for recommendations to the full Board in January 2020.

The Executive Committee expressed its thanks and extended its compliments to the ARRL staff and volunteers for “their outstanding work at the just-completed National Convention as part of Dayton Hamvention 2019.”

The minutes of the May 20 Executive Committee meeting have been posted on the ARRL website.

ARRL Files Interim Report with FCC in “Symbol Rate” Proceeding

ARRL has filed an interim report with the FCC in order to report on its efforts to find common ground regarding issues surrounding the “symbol” or “baud” rate proceeding, FCC Docket WT 16-239 (the FCC has issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking in WT 16-239, which stemmed from ARRL’s rulemaking petition RM-11708). ARRL highlighted that the public benefits from the FCC’s “fairly flexible” regulation of Amateur Radio, citing innovative developments in digital technology, including WSJT-X.

Noting that more than 1,400 comments in total have been filed in this and on a related rulemaking petition (RM-11831), ARRL pointed out that, as in other Commission-regulated areas, adapting current regulations to rapidly evolving technology presents challenges that may require adjustments to, or clarifications of, the governing regulations. Making such adjustments can be a challenge to ensure that valid regulatory purposes continue to be served without hindering technological change and innovation in the process.

While a June 11 meeting organized by ARRL had to be reset to accommodate the invited parties, ARRL has re-affirmed its commitment to protecting the interests of all amateurs. ARRL said it will continue to pursue its efforts to address and reconcile differing opinions expressed in the two matters now pending before the FCC.

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LightSail 2 Set to Launch on June 22

The Planetary Society’s citizen-funded LightSail 2 solar-propelled spacecraft is set to launch on June 22 on board a SpaceX Falcon Heavy. It will attempt the first controlled solar sail flight in Earth orbit. LightSail 1 successfully completed its test flight mission in 2015. LightSail® is aimed at testing “solar sailing” technology for CubeSats, which comprise many Amateur Radio satellites. According to the Planetary Society, solar sailing uses reflective sails to harness the momentum of sunlight for propulsion. “One disadvantage to CubeSats is that they typically lack propulsion, which limits their range of applications,” The Planetary Society says. “LightSail will demonstrate the viability of using solar sailing for CubeSats.”

Scientific collaboration between The Planetary Society and Russia led to the creation of Cosmos 1, a solar sail spacecraft launched aboard a repurposed ICBM. But test flights in 2001 and 2005 failed due to problems with the launch vehicle. The first successful solar sail was launched by Japan in 2010, when the IKAROS spacecraft was deployed from a Venus-bound space probe. NASA has looked into using solar sails to de-orbit CubeSats with atmospheric drag, and its Nanosail-D2 mission in 2010 was successful. The Planetary Society’s LightSail program was initiated a year earlier. It aimed to construct a CubeSat similar to Nanosail-D that would demonstrate true solar sailing. LightSail 1 snagged a slot aboard an Atlas V launch in 2015, but the target orbit was not high enough for solar sailing thrust to overcome atmospheric drag. The Planetary Society accepted the free ride anyway and successfully tested the spacecraft’s sail deployment mechanism.

LightSail 2 will be enclosed within Prox-1, a Georgia Tech student-built spacecraft the size of a small washing machine. Prox-1 will detach from the Falcon Heavy into a circular 720-kilometer orbit. A week later, it will deploy LightSail 2.

The Doctor Will See You Now!

The Doctor opens the Listener Mailbag in the new (June 20) episode of the ARRL The Doctor is In podcast. Listen…and learn!

Sponsored by DX EngineeringARRL The Doctor is In is an informative discussion of all things technical. Listen on your computer, tablet, or smartphone — whenever and wherever you like!

Every 2 weeks, your host, QST Editor-in-Chief Steve Ford, WB8IMY, and the Doctor himself, Joel Hallas, W1ZR, will discuss a broad range of technical topics. You can also email your questions to doctor@arrl.org, and the Doctor may answer them in a future podcast.

Enjoy ARRL The Doctor is In on Apple iTunes, or by using your iPhone or iPad podcast app (just search for ARRL The Doctor is In). You can also listen online at Blubrry, or at Stitcher (free registration required, or browse the site as a guest) and through the free Stitcher app for iOS, Kindle, or Android devices. If you’ve never listened to a podcast before, download our beginner’s guide.

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ARRL, IARU Contingents to Attend HAM RADIO 2019 in Germany

Delegations from ARRL and the International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) will attend HAM RADIO 2019, the popular international Amateur Radio exhibition in Friedrichshafen, Germany. Each year, a contingent from ARRL attends HAM RADIO, greeting its non-US members and networking with other national radio societies. Billed as Europe’s biggest Amateur Radio convention, HAM RADIO 2019 takes place June 21 – 23 on the shores of Lake Constance.

ARRL representatives will include ARRL President Rick Roderick, K5UR; International Affairs Vice President Jay Bellows, K0QB, and ARRL staff members CEO Howard Michel, WB2ITX; Product Development Manager Bob Inderbitzen, NQ1R, and Regulatory Information Manager Dan Henderson, N1ND.

Attending on behalf of the IARU are President Tim Ellam, VE6SH/G4HUA; Secretary David Sumner, K1ZZ, and past IARU Secretary and ARRL President (1995 – 2000) Rod Stafford, W6ROD.

This year’s event marks the 44th HAM RADIO exhibition and the 70th Lake Constance Convention of Radio Amateurs, sponsored by Germany’s IARU member-society, the Deutscher Amateur Radio Club (DARC). The convention theme this year is “Amateur Radio on Tour.”

DARC Press Spokesperson Stephanie Heine, DO7PR, points out, “Radio amateurs know no bounds and are on land and water as well as in the air with their mobile ‘ham radio shacks.’ They like having the option of being reachable all over the world on their expeditions and getting to know new friends.”

Some 180 exhibitors and associations from 32 countries are expected to attend. In 2018, the event drew 15,460 visitors from 63 countries.

Radio Amateur to Lose License as Part of Enforcement Case Settlement

New Jersey radio amateur David S. Larsen, Sr., WS2L, of Highland Park, will surrender his Amateur Extra-class license and pay a $7,500 civil penalty as part of a Consent Decree with the FCC to settle an enforcement action. An FCC Enforcement Bureau Order released June 18 said Larsen violated the Communications Act of 1934 and Part 90 rules by operating on frequencies licensed to the Borough of Highland Park for public safety communication.

As part of the settlement, Larsen admitted to making the unauthorized transmissions, and he agreed not to engage in unauthorized use of a radio station, and to surrender radios in his possession capable of transmitting on the town’s public safety frequencies. If the Commission finds that Larsen makes unauthorized radio transmissions or otherwise violates the terms of the Consent Decree, he’ll be subject to an additional $32,500 civil penalty. The agreement stipulates that Larsen may not apply for a new Amateur Radio license for 3 years.

The case stems from a May 2018 complaint of unauthorized transmissions on the Highland Park municipal radio system. FCC agents followed up with several visits to the town.

“Based on information provided by the complainant and direct observations by the Bureau’s agents, the unauthorized transmissions consisted of brief, pre-recorded sounds (such as the sad trombone sound),” the FCC said in the Consent Decree. The FCC said individuals the agents interviewed identified Larsen — a former rescue squad volunteer — as the person who was likely responsible.

Responding to an FCC Letter of Inquiry, Larsen subsequently contacted the Enforcement Bureau and related that the unauthorized transmissions had ceased. Last fall, Larsen, responded to the inquiry through counsel to deny making the unauthorized transmissions. A short time later, the unauthorized transmissions resumed, and the FCC restarted its investigation, attempting to trace the source of the transmissions. Last March, agents used direction-finding equipment at a fixed location near the complainant’s residence, while other agents conducted mobile direction finding of Larsen’s vehicle in transit.

“The four agents observed Mr. Larsen pull over to the side of the road on the way to his home,” the Consent Decree recounts. “The four Bureau agents observed (a) that during the brief stop, Mr. Larsen remained in his vehicle, (b) while stopped, a brief transmission consisting of the sad trombone sound emanated from the direction of Mr. Larsen’s vehicle on a frequency licensed for use by the Highland Park Radio System, and (c) following the transmission of the sad trombone sound, Mr. Larsen resumed his drive to his residence.”

The FCC said agents returned in April to observe Larsen repeat the earlier behavior, including a similar transmission emanating from Mr. Larsen’s vehicle, according to the Decree.

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Pennsylvania Radio Amateur Dies in Tower Installation Mishap

Well-known northeastern Pennsylvania radio amateur Leland L. “Lee” Parsons III, N3LPJ, lost his life on June 14 during a ham tower installation project when a tower section he was working on collapsed off State Route 2069 in Gibson Township. Authorities said Parsons, 62, was apparently attempting to attach a guy wire to the bottom tower section when it went over. An ARRL member, Parsons was the president of the Susquehanna County Amateur Radio Club.

[WNEP TV16 video]

The online Wireless Estimatorcalled the incident “a stark reminder of the dangers present this weekend during Field Day.” The article cited a 2009 Field Day tower collapse that claimed the life of 57-year-old Larry Prelog, KE4PM — an experienced climber — while he was installing an antenna. In that incident, two legs at the base of the tower buckled.

The Wireless Estimator article also recalled the death of the Reverend Paul Bittner, W0AIH, 84, a well-known radio amateur, contester, and Field Day participant, who lost his life last October when he fell from one of the towers at his extensive antenna farm in Wisconsin.

The K7RA Solar Update

Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: The quiet sun continues, with yet another week of zero sunspots. As of mid-week, that makes 32 days with no sunspot activity. So far this year, 62% of the days have been spotless, much the same as last year’s 61%. The average daily solar flux over the past week was 67.1, down from 69 a week ago, and 69.5 2 weeks ago.

Predicted solar flux over the next 45 days is 67 on June 20 – 27; 69 on June 28 – July 4; 68 on July 5 – 6; 69 on July 7 – 9; 68 on July 10 – 11; 67 and 66 on July 12 – 13; 67 on July 14 – 20; 68 on July 21 – 24; 69 on July 25 – 31; 68 on August 1 – 2, and 69 on August 3.

Predicted planetary A index is 12, 10, 8, 5, 8, 12, and 8 on June 20 – 26; 5 on June 27 – July 5; 8 on July 6; 5 on July 7 – 9; 8 on July 10 – 11; 5 and 8 on July 12 – 13; 12 on July 14 – 17; 10, 8, 5, 8, 12, and 8 on July 18 – 23; 5 on July 24 – August 1, then 8 and 5 on August 2 – 3.

Sunspot numbers for June 13 through 19, 2019 were 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, and 0, with a mean of 0. The 10.7 centimeter flux was 67.5, 68, 66.7, 65.9, 66.3, 67, and 68, with a mean of 69. Estimated planetary A indices were 10, 8, 4, 4, 3, 4, and 4, with a mean of 5.9. Middle latitude A index was 12, 13, 6, 6, 5, 3, and 4, with a mean of 6.3.

A comprehensive K7RA Solar Update is posted Fridays on the ARRL website. For more information concerning radio propagation, visit the ARRL Technical Information Service, read “What the Numbers Mean…,” and check out K9LA’s Propagation Page.

A propagation bulletin archive is available. Monthly charts offer propagation projections between the US and a dozen DX locations.

Share your reports and observations.


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Just Ahead in Radiosport
  • June 22 – 23 — ARRL Field Day (CW, phone, digital)

  • June 22 – 23 — Ukrainian DX DIGI Contest

  • June 22 – 23 — His Majesty King of Spain Contest, SSB

  • June 24 – 25 — QCX Challenge (CW)

  • June 26 — SKCC Sprint (CW)

  • June 27 — 3.5 RSGB 80-Meter Club Championship, SSB

See the ARRL Contest Calendar for more information. For in-depth reporting on Amateur Radio contesting, subscribe to The ARRL Contest Update via your ARRL member profile email preferences.

Historic 2-Meter Transatlantic Contact Reported

D41CV on Cape Verde Islands and FG8OJ in Guadeloupe spanned the Atlantic Ocean on 2 meters for the first time on June 16, according to reports. The distance was 3,867 kilometers (2,397.5 miles). The historic contact was made on 144.174 MHz using FT8 mode.

“The mode of propagation was most likely marine ducting, with the signal traveling in a layer near the ocean surface,” said John Desmond, EI7GL, who was among those posting information on the contact. Mark De Munck, EA8FF, was at the helm of D41CV, the Monteverde Contest Team club station, off the coast of Africa. He used the beacon antenna at the station, as the so-called “Pinocchio Yagi” was down for repair. Bert Demarcq, FG8OJ, was on the other end of the contact.

“Now that this historic contact has been made, more 144 MHz contacts across this part of the Atlantic are sure to follow,” Desmond said.

The initial contact does not qualify for the Brendan Trophies and Brendan Shields awards, because they require a valid contact to be made between Europe and the Americas on 2 meters. The distance covered, however, was greater than the distance between Ireland and Newfoundland.

“We continue to write a part of the history and to push barriers further away,” a post on the D4C VHF & Up Facebook page said.

ARRL ARDF Coordinator Steps Down, New Coordinator Named

ARRL Amateur Radio Direction Finding (ARDF) Coordinator Joe Moell, K0OV, is stepping down after more than 20 years on the job. Since he became ARRL ARDF Coordinator in February 1998, Moell said the sport of on-foot transmitter hunting under international rules has grown steadily in participation and popularity. Since 2001, beginners and experts alike have gathered each year for the USA Championships of ARDF.

ARRL ARDF Coordinator Joe Moell, K0OV.

ARRL President Rick Roderick, K5UR, has appointed Jerry Boyd, WB8WFK, of Albuquerque, New Mexico, as the new ARRL ARDF Coordinator, effective on July 1. Boyd has been involved in ARDF for many years and has been a frequent medal winner at USA’s championships. He headed the team of organizers for the 2002, 2005, and 2011 USA and IARU Region 2 ARDF Championships, held in his hometown. He was on Team USA for the 2004, 2006, and 2010 ARDF World Championships. Boyd also holds an appointment as ARRL Official Observer Coordinator for the New Mexico Section.

The ARRL ARDF Coordinator is responsible for overseeing the selection of Team USA members for the World ARDF Championships

Incoming ARRL ARDF Coordinator Jerry Boyd, WB8WFK.

in even-numbered years, selecting the location and organizers of the annual USA ARDF Championships, and working with coordinators and working groups of other nations and IARU regions to schedule activities and develop rule updates, among other activities.

As Boyd prepares to take the reins, President Roderick has expressed gratitude for all Moell has done for the advancement of ARDF. Moell will continue posting radio-orienteering event news and photos on his Homing In website and participating with other southern California ARDF enthusiasts. He expressed his appreciation for the efforts of all who have worked to make ARDF practices and competitions available to aspiring champions. “ARDF has moved from a novelty into the mainstream of Amateur Radio,” he said. “It is recognized as an ideal way to interest young people in our hobby and to get them started. Please keep up the good work.” Read more.

Morse Code is Still a Hit

The music lyrics website Genius came up with an ingenious way of determining if other sites — specifically Google — had been lifting song lyrics directly from its site and reposting them without permission. According to the Wall Street Journal, starting in 2016, Genius strategically placed both straight and curly apostrophes in their rendering of a song’s lyrics. When converted into Morse code, the rigged punctuation spells out the words “red handed.” Genius claims it’s uncovered more than 100 instances where Google used Genius’s own lyrics in Google search results.

“Over the last two years, we’ve shown Google irrefutable evidence again and again that they are displaying lyrics copied from Genius,” Genius’s chief strategy officer Ben Gross told the Wall Street Journal. “We noticed that Google’s lyrics matched our lyrics down to the character.”

The Wall Street Journal corroborated the accusations by matching the results of three songs randomly chosen from the list of 100 instances. Google denied the allegations through its partnership with LyricFind, which provides the search engine with lyrics through a deal with music publishers. “We do not source lyrics from Genius,” LyricFind Chief Executive Darryl Ballantyne said. — Thanks to Rolling Stone and other media reports

In Brief…

ARRL has produced a downloadable video, What is Amateur Radio?, to use at club meetings and public events. This could be an attractive addition for visitors to your ARRL Field Day site this weekend. The video runs just under 3 minutes. A PowerPoint version is also available.

Paul Stiles, KF7SOJ, will become ARRL Montana Section Manager on October 1. Stiles, of Billings, was the only candidate after nominations for the position were re-solicited this spring, and will serve an 18-month term. He will take over the position following George Forsyth, AA7GS, of Great Falls, who decided not to run for a new term after serving since 2013. There are no contested seats in the summer SM election cycle. These incumbent Section Managers had no opposition and were declared re-elected to start new terms on October 1: Jack Ciaccia, WM0G (Colorado); Jack Tiley, AD7FO (Eastern Washington); David Benoist, AG4ZR (Georgia); Diana Feinberg, AI6DF (Los Angeles); Carol Milazzo, KP4MD (Sacramento Valley); Bill Hillendahl, KH6GJV (San Francisco); Paul Gilbert, KE5ZW (South Texas); Dan Ringer, K8WV (West Virginia), and Monte Simpson, AF7PQ (Western Washington).

AMSAT has announced Field Day on the Satellites. June 22 – 23 is ARRL Field Day weekend, and each year AMSAT promotes its own concurrent event, focused on operation via the amateur satellites. ARRL Field Day offers bonus points for making a contact via satellite. The AMSAT Field Day 2019 event is open to all radio amateurs, and the AMSAT Field Day exchange is the same as that for ARRL Field Day. To reduce congestion, participants are limited to one contact per FM satellite, including the ISS. Complete rules for AMSAT Field Day are on the AMSAT website.

Ham Radio Newscast Producer Hap Holly, KC9RP, and The RAIN Report have retired. Holly has been producing the The RAIN Report(Radio Amateur Information Network) newscast every week for 30 years, and the farewell edition is now available. “The archives will remain online for those who want to download and/or broadcast them,” Holly told ARRL. “My thought is to expand the archive from RAIN Reports that have never been archived.” A ham since 1969, Holly was a prolific reporter of Dayton Hamvention® news and forum accounts over the years, and in 2002, was named Hamvention’s 2002 Amateur of the Year. He produced The RAIN Report from his home studio/ham shack in suburban Chicago.


Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions

Find conventions and hamfests in your area.


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The ARRL Letter

The ARRL Letter offers a weekly summary of essential news of interest to active amateurs that is available in advance of publication in QST, our official journal. The ARRL Letterstrives to be timely, accurate, concise and readable.

Much of the ARRL Letter content is also available in audio form in ARRL Audio News.

Material from The ARRL Letter may be republished or reproduced in whole or in part in any form without additional permission. Credit must be given to The ARRL Letter and The American Radio Relay League.

Back issues published since 2000 are available on this page. If you wish to subscribe via e-mail, simply log on to the ARRL Web site, click on Edit Your Profile at the top, then click on Edit Email Subscriptions. Check the box next to The ARRL email newsletter, the ARRL Letter and you will receive each weekly issue in HTML format. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Delivery problems (ARRL member direct delivery only!): letter-dlvy@arrl.org

Editorial questions or comments: Rick Lindquist, WW1ME, at ww1me@arrl.org.

Plain-Text

The ARRL E-Letter e-mail is also available in plain-text version:

Outlook Express

1. From the Inbox view, select the Tools menu and the Options selection.

2. Click the Read tab

3. Check the Read All Messages In Plain Text box.  When you open the e-mail, it will be in plain text without images. Other e-mail programs may be able to make a Mail Rule for e-mail received from the address memberlist@www.arrl.org so that the plain-text-only display is selected automatically.

Outlook 2007

Use the same procedure as for Outlook Express, although the global option is under “Tools/Trust Center/E-mail Security”.

Thunderbird

Use the menu item “View/Message Body As/Plain Text” or “View/Message Source” options.

OS X Mail (Mac)

Use the “View/Message/Plain Text Alternative” menu item.

GMail

Use the “Message text garbled?” link in the drop-down menu at the upper right of the displayed message block. pine, alpine Set “prefer-plain-text” in your ~/.pinerc configuration file: feature-list=…, prefer-plain-text, …

Hawaii Island Amateur/Ham Radio News:

The Big Island Amateur Radio Club will participate in the 2019 ARRL Field Day event this Saturday and Sunday at the Hilo Bayfront Parking Lot #1.  Set up begins at 0700 HST on Saturday.  For details, go here: http://biarc.net/fieldday.shtml

“Grid Madness 2019”, the Hawaii Island-based VHF/UHF Simplex Contest, is set for Sunday, 15 September 2019, from 1300 to 1700 HST.  You can download the complete event package here: https://gridmadness.blogspot.com

For the latest Amateur/Ham Radio news and information, please check the blog sidebars and links. These news feeds are updated daily and weekly.  Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ Roberts (KH6JRM)

Public Information Coordinator

Hawaii County, ARRL Pacific Section

https://bigislandarrlnews.com

BIARC 2019 Field Day


Welcome to the “BIARC 2019 Field Day” update from Big Island ARRL News.

Views expressed in this Amateur/Ham Radio News summary are those of the reporters and correspondents.

Content, including text, photos, images, and video, provided by the Big Island Amateur Radio Club (BIARC).

Accessed on 20 June 2019, 1905 UTC, Post 1012.

Source:  http://biarc.net/fieldday.shtml

Please scroll down to read the BIARC 2019 Field Day announcement.

Thanks to Tony Kitchen (WH6DVI) for the press release.

B.I.A.R.C 
Big Island Amateur Radio Club
KH6EJ
BIARC Home

Club Information

Officers
Committees
Members

Constitution
Bylaws

Constitution & Bylaws-PDF (Printable)

Membership
Executive Board Agenda-PDF

Activities:

Calendar of Events
Classes & Training
2019 Field Day!

Communication:

Newsletters
Repeaters
Nets
BIARC Listserve
ARES Information
Prowords

External Links

Information

2019 BIARC Field Day!

Location:

Hilo Bayfront Parking Lot#1

Date:

Saturday, June 22nd

Time:

07:00 AM Setup (Additional Volunteers needed.)
08:00 Begin Operations
12:00 Lunch: Hot Dogs, Chips, Potato/Mac Salad
22:00 End of Normal Operations*

*

Two volunteer operators are needed for possible nighttime operations from 22:00 Saturday to 08:00 Sunday. (Nitetime and early morning shifts)

Contact Tony Kitchen via email to volunteer tonykitchen808@gmail.com if you can commit to overnite RF/Security operations. Your name must be submitted to the parks department in advance.Only 2 BIARC members can be present after 22:00 hours. Deadline: Thursday at 11:00 AM.

Look for Roy’s 30′ tower (WH6FYK) which will be setup with a cobweb HF and
VHF antenna.

WH6FYK Mobile Tower

See the Google Earth View below for Field Day location:

GoogleEarthView


Except where noted, all original content Copyright © BIARC.net and Big Island Amateur Radio Club 2005 – 2019. All rights reserved.


Big Island Amateur Radio Club. P. O. Box 1938, Hilo, HI 96721-1938. 

Hawaii Island Amateur/Ham Radio News:

“Grid Madness 2019”, the Hawaii-based VHF/UHF Simplex Contest is set for Sunday, 15 September 2019, 1300-1700 HST.  You can download the complete contest package here:  https://gridmadness.blogspot.com. Also, you can contact Stan (AH6KO), the event coordinator, at ah6ko@arrl.net.

Doug Wilson (KH7DQ) is offering one more free Technician License Class on Hawaii Island for 2019.  That class is set for 17 October 2019 at the Keaau Community Center in Keaau, Hawaii Island.  For details, please contact Doug here: douscelle@aol.com.

For the latest Amateur/Ham Radio news and information, please check the blog sidebars and links.  These news feeds are updated daily and weekly.  Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ Roberts (KH6JRM)

Public Information Coordinator

Hawaii County, ARRL Pacific Section

https://bigislandarrlnews.com

ARLX005 W1AW Field Day Bulletin Schedule


Here’s the current W1AW Field Day Bulletin Schedule from Big Island ARRL News.

Views expressed in this Amateur/Ham Radio News summary are those of the reporters and correspondents.

Content, including text, photos, images, and video, provided by HQ ARRL, 225 Main Street, Newington, CT, 06111.

Accessed on 18 June 2019, 0220 UTC, Post 1008.

Source (via email):

https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/?tab=rm&ogbl#label/ARRL+website/FMfcgxwChJjpRPKmgQLkSXtBlzxlHfTj

Please click link or scroll down to read the full message.

SB SPCL @ ARL $ARLX005
ARLX005 2019 W1AW Field Day Bulletin Schedule

ZCZC AX05
QST de W1AW
Special Bulletin 5  ARLX005
From ARRL Headquarters
Newington CT  June 17, 2019
To all radio amateurs

SB SPCL ARL ARLX005
ARLX005 2019 W1AW Field Day Bulletin Schedule

Day      Mode     Pacific    Mountain   Central   Eastern   UTC

FRIDAY   CW       5:00 PM    6:00 PM    7:00 PM   8:00 PM   0000 (Sat)
Digital  6:00 PM    7:00 PM    8:00 PM   9:00 PM   0100
Phone    6:45 PM    7:45 PM    8:45 PM   9:45 PM   0145
CW       8:00 PM    9:00 PM   10:00 PM  11:00 PM   0300

SATURDAY CW       7:00 AM    8:00 AM    9:00 AM  10:00 AM   1400
Phone    8:00 AM    9:00 AM   10:00 AM  11:00 AM   1500
CW       5:00 PM    6:00 PM    7:00 PM   8:00 PM   0000 (Sun)
Digital  6:00 PM    7:00 PM    8:00 PM   9:00 PM   0100
Phone    6:45 PM    7:45 PM    8:45 PM   9:45 PM   0145

SUNDAY   CW       7:00 AM    8:00 AM    9:00 AM  10:00 AM   1400
Phone    8:00 AM    9:00 AM   10:00 AM  11:00 AM   1500
Digital  9:00 AM   10:00 AM   11:00 AM  12:00 PM   1600

K6KPH Field Day Bulletin Schedule

SATURDAY CW        7:30 AM   8:30 AM   9:30 AM  10:30 AM   1403
CW        5:30 PM   6:30 PM   7:30 PM   8:30 PM   0030 (Sun)
Digital   6:30 PM   7:30 PM   8:30 PM   9:30 PM   0130

SUNDAY   CW        7:30 AM   8:30 AM   9:30 AM  10:30 AM   1430
Digital   9:30 AM  10:30 AM  11:30 AM  12:30 AM   1630

W1AW will operate on its regularly published frequencies.

CW frequencies are 1.8025, 3.5815, 7.0475, 14.0475, 18.0975,
21.0675, 28.0675, 50.350, and 147.555 MHz.

Digital frequencies are 3.5975, 7.095, 14.095, 18.1025, 21.095,
28.095, 50.350, and 147.555 MHz.

Phone frequencies are 1.855, 3.990, 7.290, 14.290, 18.160, 21.390,
28.590, 50.350, and 147.555 MHz.

During Field Day weekend, W1AW will transmit the Field Day bulletin
using 45.45-baud Baudot, PSK31 in BPSK mode and MFSK16 in this
order.

Please note the Field Day bulletin will not be sent out via
EchoLink.

In addition, on Friday local, June 21, 2019, the digital version of
the Field Day bulletin sent at 9 PM EDT (0100 UTC June 22) will be
transmitted using BPSK31, Baudot, and MFSK16 in this order.  The
regular digital mode lineup of Baudot, BPSK31, and MFSK16 will be
used during Field Day weekend.

For 2019, Maritime Radio Historical Society station K6KPH will not
be transmitting the CW bulletin on 18.0975 MHz.  However, K6KPH has
added 3.5975 MHz to its digital bulletin frequencies.

The Maritime Radio Historical Society station K6KPH will transmit
the W1AW Field Day 2019 bulletin for the benefit of West Coast
stations on 3.5815, 7.0475, 14.0475 and 21.0675 MHz using CW.

K6KPH will transmit the Field Day bulletin using Baudot, BPSK31 and
MFSK16 in this order on 3.5975, 7.095 and 14.095 MHz.

The K6KPH schedule is accurate as of June 17, 2019.

Any additional transmissions or changes in the schedule will be
posted on the web at, http://www.arrl.org/Field-Day .
NNNN
/EX


You can get extra Field Day points by copying the W1AW Bulletin correctly.


ARRL files interim report with FCC in Symbol Rate Case

Source (via email):

https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/?tab=rm&ogbl#label/ARRL+website/FMfcgxwChJjpbZVnwttGVZDwmBTmfWQX

Please click link or scroll down to read the full report.

SB QST @ ARL $ARLB017
ARLB017 ARRL Files Interim Report with FCC in “Symbol Rate”
Proceeding

ZCZC AG17
QST de W1AW
ARRL Bulletin 17  ARLB017
From ARRL Headquarters
Newington CT  June 17, 2019
To all radio amateurs

SB QST ARL ARLB017
ARLB017 ARRL Files Interim Report with FCC in “Symbol Rate”
Proceeding

ARRL has filed an interim report with the FCC in order to report on
its efforts to find common ground regarding issues surrounding the
“symbol” or “baud” rate proceeding, FCC Docket WT 16-239 (the FCC
has issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking in WT 16-239, which
stemmed from ARRL’s rulemaking petition RM-11708).

The NPRM can be found online in PDF format at,
https://ecfsapi.fcc.gov/file/0728122180423/FCC-16-96A1.pdf .  The
ARRL interim report can also be found online at,
https://www.fcc.gov/ecfs/filing/10612301212113 .

ARRL highlighted that the public benefits from the FCC’s “fairly
flexible” regulation of Amateur Radio. In particular, innovative
developments in digital technology, including WSJT-X, were cited.

Noting that more than 1,400 comments in total have been filed in
this and on a related rulemaking petition (RM-11831), ARRL pointed
out that, as in other Commission-regulated areas, adapting current
regulations to rapidly evolving technology presents challenges that
may require adjustments to, or clarifications of, the governing
regulations. Making such adjustments can be a challenge to ensure
that valid regulatory purposes continue to be served without
stymieing technological change and innovation in the process.

While a June 11 meeting organized by ARRL had to be reset to
accommodate the invited parties, ARRL has re-affirmed its commitment
to protecting the interests of all amateurs. ARRL said it will
continue to pursue its efforts to address and reconcile differing
opinions expressed in the two matters now pending before the FCC.
NNNN
/EX

———————————-

Hawaii Island Amateur/Ham Radio News:

Doug Wilson (KH7DQ) will offer his last free Technician License Class

on 17 October 2019 at the Keaau Community Center in Keaau, Hawaii

Island.  For details, contact Doug at douscelle@aol.com


“Grid Madness 2019”, the Hawaii Island-based VHF/UHF Simplex

Contest is set for Sunday, 15 September 2019, from 1300-1700 HST.

For details, go here:  https://gridmadness.blogspot.com


For the latest Amateur/Ham Radio news and information, please

check the blog sidebars and links.  These links are updated daily

and weekly.  Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russell Roberts (KH6JRM)

Public Information Coordinator

Hawaii County, ARRL Pacific Section

https://bigislandarrlnews.com

 

The ARRL Contest Update for May 29, 2019


Welcome to “The ARRL Contest Update” from Big Island ARRL News. Views expressed in this Amateur/Ham Radio news summary are those of the reporters and correspondents.  Content provide by Editor Brian Moran (N9ADG) and HQ ARRL, 225 Main Street, Newington, CT, 06111.  Accessed on 29 May 2019, 1550 UTC, Post 987.

Source:

http://www.arrl.org/contest-update-ussues?issue=2019-05-29

Please click link or scroll down to read the complete text.

IN THIS ISSUE
NEW HF OPERATORS – THINGS TO DO

Three words: Field Day Preparation. Many participate in ARRL Field Day by joining with their local radio club, while some go it alone. If you’ve not made plans yet, check out the ARRL Field Day website and especially the Field Day Locator to find a group that will be active.

BUSTED QSOS

W6PNG’s name is Paul. (Matt, K0BBC)

CONTEST SUMMARY

Complete information for all contests follows the Conversation section

30 May  12 Jun 2019

May 30

May 31

June 1

June 2

June 4

June 5

June 6

June 7

June 8

June 9

June 10

June 12

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NEWS, PRESS RELEASES, AND GENERAL INTEREST

Registration for Contest University, 2020 begins on December 19, 2019.

N1MM Logger+, representing over 60% of nearly any contest’s “market share” for loggers, has a new website. Larry, K8UT, pointed to a summary of the changes, but the most significant are fewer number of pages, better search capabilities, better bug/issue tracking visibility and reporting, and a “single sortable/searchable table listing all supported contests.” Other ham radio software projects should take note: the ability for website visitors to easily see the status of issues and reported bugs is a feature that helps the development team by reducing the volume of messages of duplicate reports for a single common issue.

Larry, N6NC, wrote in regarding “Stochastic Resonance” mentioned in the last issue: “In low power Sweepstakes under bad band conditions, we used to CQ high in the band at the edge of the “shadow” of a continuous commercial or military signal located there. That gave us a clearer channel at the edge of the continuous signal which provided the white background noise. Exactly what you describe above–“Stochastic Resonance”– is what would happen, and we could work guys that otherwise couldn’t hear us.”

There’s a “kind-of” competition between RBN receiving stations to receive all 18 NCDXF beacon stations over a 24-hour time period. Jose, CT1BOH, sent email to the Reverse Beacon Network (RBN) operators on May 14: “13 May was a good propagation day, and both CT1BOH and ON5KQ Skimmers have copied all 18 NCDXF Beacons, with KH6RS being the last one for both of them.” This is a good competition, because on the days that the receivers “win” because of good propagation it’s more likely you’ll make more DX contacts.

Bob, N6TV, wrote to the NCCC Reflector: “As you may have heard by now, at Dayton three new members were inducted into the CQ Contest Hall of Fame:

  • Chris Kovarik, 9A5K (SK), author of DXlog.net
  • Bruce Horn, WA7BNM, creator of 3830scores.com and the Contest Calendar
  • Dean Straw, N6BV, author of HFTA and so many other contributions

Dean was unable to attend the event in person due to scheduling conflicts. So just for Dean (and his many friends), I captured on video the induction speeches presented by K6MM and K1AR in honor of Dean. You’ll also see what 500+ contesters in one dinner looks like. Congratulations Dean!

Left to right in the video you’ll see glimpses of rarely-seen WA7BNM (white hair), K3ZJ, K1AR, and K6MM. — 73, Bob, N6TV”

The Hamvention in Xenia, Ohio saw many announcements of products that are likely of interest to contesters, including Elecraft’s K4 transceiver.

DX Engineering announced their first antenna rotator they’ve ever manufactured, the RT4500HD Heavy-Duty Antenna Mast Rotator. It boasts of improved reliability, improved wind load handling, and easier maintenance among it’s many features.

RF-KIT’s new solid-state legal-limit RF2K-S HF+6m amplifier will be available from DX Engineering in Fall of 2019 in both kit and FCC-certified assembled forms. Features include silent PIN diode switching, a 7-inch color touch screen, internal antenna tuner, and CAT/LAN/WiFi connectivity, along with software updates via the Internet. “RF-KIT is widely recognized around the world for its competitively priced, high-performance amplifiers. We’re proud to be the company responsible for getting the new RF2K-S into the hands of customers in North America–fast and conveniently” states Tim, K3LR, CEO of DX Engineering.

The worldwide Amateur Radio community is invited to participate in the Czech-sponsored Pohotovostní (readiness) Test — or “P-Test” — which will take place on June 13. The goal of the event is to help assess activity on 6 meters and the ability of Amateur Radio to share spectrum with government users on the band. For more information, see this article in the ARRL Letter. (ARRL Letter)

WORD TO THE WISE

Macro

macro is a fragment of a message sent by a computer logging program during a phase of a contest contact. The macro is the part of the message that the computer may fill in with specific information such as call sign or serial number. Macros can also be “silent” but perform some logging operation such as clearing an entry field. An example message containing a macro is “CQ TEST {MYCALL} {MYCALL}.”

SIGHTS AND SOUNDS

During the recent CQ WW WPX contest, stations were posting updates to Twitter including the #WPX hashtag. Many excellent pictures and in-the-moment comments indicate conditions were pretty darn good!

David Siddall, K3ZJ, presents the CQ Contest Hall of Fame Plaque for Kresimir Kovarik, 9A5K (SK), to his friend Krassimir Petkov, K1LZ, May 18th, 2019, at the Contest Dinner in Dayton, Ohio. [Credit: Bob, N6TV, Photo]

Krassy, K1LZ, spoke at the induction of Kresimir (Chris), 9A5K (SK) into the CQ Contest Hall of Fame; Marty, NN1C, captured and posted the video.

Max, NG7M “cornered Eric, WA6HHQ, for a few minutes and did a quick Q&A on the (Elecraft) K4….Eric gives a quick overview of the three different version of the K4, K4 HD and the K4 HD with the Superhet module, plus touches on several other topics based on my random questions.

Tim, K3LR, writes: “Saturday night’s 27th annual contest dinner in Dayton had 510 contesters in attendance. Keynote speaker Ted, N9NB talked about how Amateur Radio influenced his life.” [Credit: Tim, K3LR, Photo]

David Siddall, K3ZJ presents CQ Contest Hall of Fame Plaque to Bruce Horn, WA7BNM, introduced by Dick Norton, N6AA, May 18th, 2019, at the Contest Dinner in Dayton, Ohio. [Credit: Bob, N6TV, Photo]

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RESULTS AND RECORDS

Received logs for the JIDX CW Contest have been posted on their website; If you made more than 20 contacts and have NOT sent in your log, the contest committee would like you to do so.

Ward, N0AX, writes:

Here are some scores from 3830 for last weekend’s CQ WW WPX CW:

Contacts Multipliers Hrs Claimed Score
KC1XX 5500 1386 48 22,286,880 BCC
K1LZ 5413 1388 48 22,286,505 YCCC

Accuracy matters.

OPERATING TIP

Watering Holes

If the contest you’re operating in has per-band multipliers, it helps to try the ‘dead bands’ for local contacts that will add a multiplier and increase your contact count by a meager amount. Some contest clubs or event sponsors designate particular times to be on particular bands (hence: “watering holes”) to pick up these easy multipliers.

TECHNICAL TOPICS AND INFORMATION

Alpha 87a amplifier owners might want to heed the advice of Larry, KJ6YVT via the Alpha 87a Yahoo Group: “If you’re unable to find UM4006D diodes at Dayton, you can always order them from Mouser. They currently have 38 in stock. I purchased two a couple of months ago before they become unobtainable.” Installation instructions are available from K4RO’s website.

The GNU Radio Conference “celebrates and showcases the substantial and remarkable progress of the world’s best open source digital signal processing framework for software-defined radios.” 2019’s event will occur September 16-20, 2019 in Huntsville, Alabama. They’re inviting “… developers and users from the GNU Radio Community to pre-sent … projects, presentations, papers, posters, and problems.” For more details, see the conference submission website. Many presentations from previous years can be found on YouTube.

Bob, N6TV, has uploaded a presentation entitled “Everything You Need to Know About USB and Serial Interfaces.” He presented this at the Dayton Contest University (CTU) last week. He has also updated his presentation “The Advantages of Waterfall Displays for Contesting and DXing.”

How does N1MM Logger+ provide a spectrum display from your radio? Check out the new N1MM Logger+ website’s page dedicated to the topic.

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CONVERSATION

Operating Incentives

With many activities competing with radio contesting for time and attention on weekends, sometimes we all need a little extra nudge to get on the air and make some contacts.

The Florida Contest Group has started a Frequent Contester Program (FCP) to increase contest participation among their members. Key goals for their program are:

  • To be rewarding for everyone, regardless of how large the station is
  • Motivate all of our members (but particularly casual contesters) to be more active in contests of their choice throughout the year

FCG’s program has five distinct levels of achievement for participating in the 147 approved contests, so there’s something for everyone. The program recognizes participants on a yearly basis, with awards being presented at their annual banquet in January. Scoring for the award is based on the time spent contesting, and some contests count for more, like the Florida QSO Party, to suit the goals of the club.

Other clubs also provide encouragement or incentive for their members in similar fashion. For example, the Northern California Contest Club has an annual “KB” competition to “To provide a means of rewarding NCCC members who are DX contesters, sprint-ers, VHFers, and especially active contesters in all modes.” Theirs runs from March to March, with 29 contests emphasized, and four levels of achievement. Points are based on contest scores, with a contest multiplier applied to suit the goals of the NCCC. Each month’s club newsletter recognizes a club member who is a ‘point generator’ for their club with an in-depth profile describing their station, interests, and ‘ham history.’

What works for sports team fans can also work for radio clubs – “us” against “them.” Some clubs have formalized ‘friendly competitions’ with other clubs. Not being on the air for a contest is like not being there for your other club members. In the Pacific Northwest, the “Traveling Trophy Competition” is held among six clubs, comprised of ten contests. The rules for the next year’s competition are hashed out if necessary at the yearly Pacific Northwest DX Convention that also rotates between clubs. East Coast contest clubs also have a rich tradition of inter-club competition.

Some clubs like the Potomac Valley Radio Club are blessed with enough club members that there are different “chapters” of the same club. So in addition to many of the incentive methods already mentioned, the chapters also compete with one another.

Your club doesn’t have to know another club personally to “pick a fight.” Some individual contest sponsors have club competitions. And don’t forget that your ARRL or RAC affiliated club can enter the ARRL Club Competition to compete across nine ARRL contests against other clubs with similar enthusiasm levels.

That’s all for this time. Remember to send contesting related stories, book reviews, tips, techniques, press releases, errata, schematics, club information, pictures, stories, blog links, and predictions to contest-update@arrl.org

73, Brian N9ADG

CONTESTS

30 May – 12 Jun 2019

An expanded, downloadable version of QST’Contest Corral is available as a PDF. Check the sponsors’ website for information on operating time restrictions and other instructions.

HF CONTESTS

CWops Mini-CWT Test, May 29, 1300z to May 29, 1400z and, May 29, 1900z to May 29, 2000z and, May 30, 0300z to May 30, 0400z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; Member: Name + Member No., non-Member: Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: June 1.

RSGB 80m Club Championship, CW, May 30, 1900z to May 30, 2030z; CW; Bands: 80m Only; RST + Serial No.; Logs due: May 31.

NCCC RTTY Sprint, May 31, 0145z to May 31, 0215z; RTTY; Bands: (see rules); Serial No. + Name + QTH; Logs due: June 2.

NCCC Sprint, May 31, 0230z to May 31, 0300z; CW; Bands: (see rules); Serial No. + Name + QTH; Logs due: June 2.

PVRC Reunion, Jun 1, 0000z to Jun 1, 0200z and, Jun 2, 0000z to Jun 2, 0200z; CW, SSB; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; PVRC Member: 1st year of membership + name + (state/province/country) + callsign when joined PVRC, non-Member: name + (state/province/country); Logs due: June 16.

10-10 Int. Open Season PSK Contest, Jun 1, 0000z to Jun 3, 0000z; PSK31; Bands: 10m Only; Name + (state/province/country) + organization membership numbers; Logs due: June 10.

DigiFest, Jun 1, 0400z to Jun 1, 1200z and, Jun 1, 2000z to Jun 2, 0400z and, Jun 2, 1200z to Jun 2, 2000z; RTTY75, BPSK63, MFSK16, HELLSCHREIBER, OLIVIA; Bands: 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; RST + 4-character grid square; Logs due: June 9.

Wake-Up! QRP Sprint, Jun 1, 0600z to Jun 1, 0629z and, Jun 1, 0630z to Jun 1, 0659z and, Jun 1, 0700z to Jun 1, 0729z and, Jun 1, 0730z to Jun 1, 0800z; CW; Bands: 40, 20m; RST + Serial No. + suffix of previous QSO (“QRP” for 1st QSO); Logs due: June 8.

SEANET Contest, Jun 1, 1200z to Jun 2, 1200z; CW, SSB; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; RS(T) + Serial No.; Logs due: July 2.

Kentucky QSO Party, Jun 1, 1400z to Jun 2, 0200z; CW, SSB, Digital; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, 6, 2m; KY: RS(T) + county, non-KY: RS(T) + (state/province/”DX”); Logs due: June 23.

RSGB National Field Day, Jun 1, 1500z to Jun 2, 1500z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; RST + Serial No.; Logs due: June 7.

Dutch Kingdom Contest, Jun 1, 1500z to Jun 2, 1500z; CW, SSB; Bands: 40, 20, 15, 10, 6m; RS(T) + Serial No.; Logs due: June 9.

IARU Region 1 Field Day, CW, Jun 1, 1500z to Jun 2, 1459z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; RST + Serial No.; Logs due: June 17.

ARS Spartan Sprint, Jun 4, 0100z to Jun 4, 0300z; CW; Bands: 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; RST + (state/province/country) + Power; Logs due: June 6.

Phone Fray, Jun 5, 0230z to Jun 5, 0300z; SSB; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15m; NA: Name + (state/province/country), non-NA: Name; Logs due: May 31.

CWops Mini-CWT Test, Jun 5, 1300z to Jun 5, 1400z and, Jun 5, 1900z to Jun 5, 2000z and, Jun 6, 0300z to Jun 6, 0400z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; Member: Name + Member No., non-Member: Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: June 8.

NRAU 10m Activity Contest, Jun 6, 1700z to Jun 6, 1800z (CW) and, Jun 6, 1800z to Jun 6, 1900z (SSB) and, Jun 6, 1900z to Jun 6, 2000z (FM) and, Jun 6, 2000z to Jun 6, 2100z (Dig); CW, SSB, FM, Digital; Bands: 10m Only; RS(T) + 6-character grid square; Logs due: June 20.

SKCC Sprint Europe, Jun 6, 1900z to Jun 6, 2100z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, 6m; RST + (state/province/country) + Name + (SKCC No./power); Logs due: June 13.

NCCC RTTY Sprint, Jun 7, 0145z to Jun 7, 0215z; RTTY; Bands: (see rules); Serial No. + Name + QTH; Logs due: June 9.

NCCC Sprint, Jun 7, 0230z to Jun 7, 0300z; CW; Bands: (see rules); Serial No. + Name + QTH; Logs due: June 9.

HA3NS Sprint Memorial Contest, Jun 7, 1900z to Jun 7, 1929z (40m) and, Jun 7, 1930z to Jun 7, 1959z (80m); CW; Bands: 80, 40m; HACWG Members: RST + Membership No., non-Members: RST + NM; Logs due: June 22.

DRCG WW RTTY Contest, Jun 8, 0000z to Jun 8, 0759z and, Jun 8, 1600z to Jun 8, 2359z and, Jun 9, 0800z to Jun 9, 1559z; RTTY; Bands: 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; RST + CQ Zone; Logs due: June 16.

VK Shires Contest, Jun 8, 0600z to Jun 9, 0600z; CW, SSB; Bands: 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; VK: RS(T) + Shire, non-VK: RS(T) + CQ Zone; Logs due: July 1.

Asia-Pacific Sprint, SSB, Jun 8, 1100z to Jun 8, 1300z; SSB; Bands: 20, 15m; RS + Serial No.; Logs due: June 15.

Portugal Day Contest, Jun 8, 1200z to Jun 9, 1200z; CW, SSB; Bands: 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; CT: RS(T) + District, non-CT: RS(T) + Serial No.; Logs due: September 1.

SKCC Weekend Sprintathon, Jun 8, 1200z to Jun 10, 0000z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, 6m; RST + (state/province/country) + Name + (SKCC No./”NONE”); Logs due: June 16.

GACW WWSA CW DX Contest, Jun 8, 1500z to Jun 9, 1500z; CW; Bands: 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; RST + CQ Zone No.; Logs due: July 30.

Cookie Crumble QRP Contest, Jun 9, 1700z to Jun 9, 2200z; All; Bands: All, except WARC; RS(T) + (state/province/country) + cookie no. + name; Logs due: July 31.

4 States QRP Group Second Sunday Sprint, Jun 10, 0000z to Jun 10, 0200z; CW, SSB; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; Member: RS(T) + (State/Province/Country) + Member No., Non-member: RS(T) + (State/Province/Country) + Power; Logs due: June 12.

RSGB 80m Club Championship, Data, Jun 10, 1900z to Jun 10, 2030z; RTTY, PSK; Bands: 80m Only; RST + Serial No.; Logs due: June 11.

NAQCC CW Sprint, Jun 12, 0030z to Jun 12, 0230z; CW; Bands: 80, 40, 20m; RST + (state/province/country) + (NAQCC No./power); Logs due: June 15.

Phone Fray, Jun 12, 0230z to Jun 12, 0300z; SSB; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15m; NA: Name + (state/province/country), non-NA: Name; Logs due: May 31.

CWops Mini-CWT Test, Jun 12, 1300z to Jun 12, 1400z and, Jun 12, 1900z to Jun 12, 2000z and, Jun 13, 0300z to Jun 13, 0400z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; Member: Name + Member No., non-Member: Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: June 15.

VHF+ CONTESTS

UKSMG Summer Contest, Jun 1, 1300z to Jun 2, 1300z; not specified; Bands: 6m Only; RST + Serial No. + 6-character grid square + (optional UKSMG member no.); Logs due: June 24.

REF DDFM 6m Contest, Jun 8, 1600z to Jun 9, 1600z; CW, SSB, FM; Bands: 6m Only; RS(T) + Serial No. + 4-character grid square; Logs due: June 17.

ARRL June VHF Contest, Jun 8, 1800z to Jun 10, 0259z; All; Bands: 50 MHz and up; 4-character grid square; Logs due: June 20.

Also, see Kentucky QSO PartyDutch Kingdom ContestSKCC Sprint EuropeSKCC Weekend Sprintathon, above.

LOG DUE DATES

30 May – 12 Jun 2019

May 30, 2019

May 31, 2019

June 1, 2019

June 2, 2019

June 3, 2019

June 4, 2019

June 6, 2019

June 7, 2019

June 8, 2019

June 9, 2019

June 10, 2019

June 11, 2019

June 12, 2019

ARRL Information

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Propagation Forecast Bulletin 25 ARLP025, 22 June 2018


Accessed on 23 June 2018, 0457 UTC, Post #600.

Source:

QST message from W1AW (via email).

Author:  Tad Cook (K7RA).

Comment:

Here is the special propagation forecast for the ARRL Field Day this weekend (23-24 June 2018).  According to Tad Cook (K7RA) and his volunteer observers, there could be improved propagation  conditions on Saturday and Sunday.

Here’s the complete Propagation Forecast from W1AW:

“SB PROP @ ARL $ARLP025
ARLP025 Propagation de K7RA

ZCZC AP25
QST de W1AW
Propagation Forecast Bulletin 25  ARLP025
From Tad Cook, K7RA
Seattle, WA  June 22, 2018
To all radio amateurs

SB PROP ARL ARLP025
ARLP025 Propagation de K7RA

On Wednesday, June 20 http://www.spaceweather.com reported the
sudden emergence of Sunspot AR2715. The sunspot number on that day
shot up to 54, and it was 53 the next day. Average daily sunspot
number for the reporting week (June 14-20) was 25.7, up from 4 the
previous week.  Average daily solar flux rose from 69.4 to 74. Solar
flux was 82.1 on June 20.

We have not seen numbers such as this since last September. This is
good news just before ARRL Field Day, assuming the activity does not
produce any geomagnetic disturbance.

Predicted solar flux is 82 on June 22, 80 on June 23-24, 78 on June
25-28, 75 and 70 on June 29-30, 68 on July 1-6, 70 on July 7, 72 on
July 8-13, 74 and 72 on July 14-15, 74 on July 16-20, 70 on July
21-27, 68 on July 28 through August 2, and 72 on August 3-5.

Predicted planetary A index is 5 on June 22-23, then 12, 8, 5, 8,
20, 15 and 10 on June 24-30, 5 on July 1-14, 8 on July 15-16, 5 on
July 17-20, 8 on July 21-22, then 5, 15, 28, 18 and 10 on July
23-27, and 5 on July 28 through August 5.

We saw some heightened geomagnetic activity on Monday, June 18 UTC
when the planetary K index rose to 5, and later in the day Alaska’s
College K index hit 6 over two of the eight 3-hour periods for the
day. College A index was 33.

Jeff Hartley, N8II of Shepherdstown West Virginia sent this report
yesterday, June 21:

“Today we are finally taking a breather from widespread sporadic-E
openings to many different areas. The best 10M opening I have worked
so far was on June 4 when I worked 72 European stations on SSB with
best DX into Poland, Slovak Republic, and Greece (most EU stations
ever worked by me in single Es opening). Quite a few were running
25W or less and I worked all of the UK countries except Jersey which
was self-spotted, incredible!

“On the morning of June 17, I heard about 15 Italian stations on 10M
CW and SSB working the Italian 10M contest; none would stop long
enough to answer my calls. But, after returning from the W3LPL open
house, I started making QSOs for the WV QSO Party on 10M SSB and
there was IT9ACN at 2207Z calling CQ in his contest and he was
thrilled to work me; he and his Sicilian friend IT9BUN were both
about S8 with QSB. I went on to work another IT9, IK7, and MM0TFU
(weak) in Scotland along with 19 USA stations to the west and south.
After a QSY to 15M, a station from northern Spain called in and
quite a few EU stations were worked in the 2300 and 2400Z hours on
20M SSB along with many Es QSOs into all W4s (except VA/NC), OH, MI,
all W9s, all W5s, and NY plus all New England states.

“The party continued on 10M SSB on the June 17 working KW2W in VT at
1309Z and then on 15M CW, HV0A Vatican (first HV in over 1-1/2
years) via probable Es.  Then back to 10M SSB double hop Es opened
by 2333Z to Steve, WB2WIK in Los Angeles also working 2 other SOCAL
stations, and on single hop QSOs with FL, KS, MO, IL, AL and MS.

“On June 18 starting at 2039Z on 10M CW I found and worked F5NBX
France, M0BKL England, and IK1ZOC Italy. Then starting 2215Z on 10
SSB I worked WP4PPV Puerto Rico, ME, and FL.

“On June 19 starting 2024Z on 10 CW, I found HB9BKL Switzerland,
M0BKL again, and was called by IU4FJI Italy. Then I switched to 10
SSB to work 2E0IQD, England and I5KAP in Florence.

“June 20 featured very intense sporadic-E for many hours returning
to 10M SSB at 0123Z putting K7CAR at a state park in UT, and another
UT, CO, AZ, KY, MI and many 4s, 5s, 9s and 0s in the log. Almost all
day long during the daytime into late evening there was widespread
Es, but I was too busy until 2350Z to operate when I worked MN, NY
grid FN13 (very unusual), VE3TM FN25, and MO on 6 meters. Then it
was down to 10 SSB to work several southern VE3s, Eastern TN,
western NC, MI, OH, TN, MI, MO, GA, and several other FL stations
going QRT at 0120Z. I saw Midwest to EU QSOs reported on 6M around
2000Z.”

Mike Treister, W9NY of Chicago wrote:

“Interesting about the increased sunspots. Have heard a lot of skip
– few hundred miles – from all directions on 6 and 10 the past few
days. Some pretty astounding signal strengths too. Nice to see so
many on the air – lots of obvious new hams who have not previously
worked 6 or 10 meter skip very excited with their QSOs. Almost more
enjoyable listening than working the stations!”

New report from Dr. Tamitha Skov:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BfIJ6ygBfwE&

If you would like to make a comment or have a tip for our readers,
email the author at, k7ra@arrl.net .

For more information concerning radio propagation, see the ARRL
Technical Information Service web page at,
http://arrl.org/propagation-of-rf-signals. For an explanation of
numbers used in this bulletin, see
http://arrl.org/the-sun-the-earth-the-ionosphere.

An archive of past propagation bulletins is at
http://arrl.org/w1aw-bulletins-archive-propagation. More good
information and tutorials on propagation are at http://k9la.us/.

Monthly propagation charts between four USA regions and twelve
overseas locations are at http://arrl.org/propagation.

Instructions for starting or ending email distribution of ARRL
bulletins are at http://arrl.org/bulletins.

Sunspot numbers for June 14 to 20, 2018 were 16, 13, 13, 15, 28, 41,
and 54, with a mean of 25.7. 10.7 cm flux was 72.4, 70.6, 70.5,
72.3, 73.7, 76.6, and 82.1, with a mean of 74. Estimated planetary A
indices were 5, 4, 3, 5, 19, 6, and 5, with a mean of 6.7. Estimated
mid-latitude A indices were 7, 6, 4, 7, 20, 6, and 7, with a mean of
8.1.
NNNN
/EX”


Hawaii Island Amateur/Ham Radio Notes:

The Big Island Amateur Radio Club (BIARC) will participate in the 2018 ARRL Field Day this Saturday, 23 June 2018, beginning at 0800 HST, at Hilo’s Reed’s Bay Hotel. The event is free and open to the public.

Jim Sugg (AH6AE) needs Hawaii Island radio amateurs “to demo how ham radio works at (the) upcoming emergency preparedness fair in Waimea (Hawaii Island)…on Saturday, August 25, 2018, from 8am-12noon…”  The event will be held at the Mana Christian Ohana Hall near the Kahilu Theatre.  For details, call Jim at (808) 747-4500 (mobile).

Please send your Hawaii Island Amateur/Ham Radio news items to kh6jrm@arrl.net for inclusion in this blog and for submission to our local print, broadcast, and social media.

For the latest Amateur/Ham Radio news and information, please check the blog sidebars and links.  These news feeds are updated daily and weekly.  Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de

Russell Roberts (KH6JRM)

Public Information Coordinator

Hawaii County, ARRL Pacific Section

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