Category Archives: Big Island of Hawaii ARRL info

ARES E Letter for 18 January 2017


Big Island ARRL News, 18 January 2017, 16:15 hrs, UTC, Post #98.

http://www.arrl.org/ares-el?issue=2017-01-18

Accessed on 18 January 2017, 16:15 hrs, UTC.

Editor:  Rick Palm (K1CE).

Please click link to read the full newsletter.

Comment:

Here are the top stories covered in the current issue of the “ARES E-Letter”:

ARES Briefs, Links

Ohio ARES Adds 6 Meters to its VHF Simplex Contest (1/13/17); Nevada ARES Standing Down as Flood Threat Abates (1/11/17); FEMA Region 10 to Conduct Monthly Interoperability Communications Exercises during 2017 (1/3/2017); Philippines’ Ham Emergency Radio Operations Net Activates for Super Typhoon (12/28/16); FEMA Interoperability Exercise Deemed a Success (12/23/16); Hawaii Amateur Radio Volunteers Assist Honolulu Marathon (12/19/16)


For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please check the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily.

For more Amateur Radio news, please visit these sites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.

https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com.

https://bigislandarrlnews.wordpress.com (this site).

https://kh6jrm.blogspot.com (Simple Ham Radio Antennas).

http://www.kh6jrm.info (breaking news for radio amateurs).

http://hawaiisciencedigest.com (science and technology news for radio amateurs).

Please send your Hawaii Island Amateur Radio news items to kh6jrm@arrl.net at least two weeks prior to your event so I can notify our local print and broadcast media in a timely manner.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de

Russell Roberts (KH6JRM)

Public Information Coordinator

Hawaii County, ARRL Pacific Section

Essex RAYNET Supporting Jaywick Evacuation.


Big Island ARRL News, 17 January 2017, 16:15 hrs, UTC, Post # 97.

Source:

http://www.southgatearc.org/news/2017/january/essex-raynet-supporting-jaywick-evacuation.htm#.WH47P8rLIV

Accessed on 17 January 2017, 16:15 hrs, UTC.

Reporter:  Southgate Amateur Radio Club (UK).

Please click link to read the full story.

Comment:

Amateur Radio operators in the United States who are active in emergency communications belong to a variety of volunteer support services such as ARES, RACES, MARS, and SATERN.  In the United Kingdom, radio amateurs who volunteer to support local emergency agencies belong to RAYNET, which does many of the same tasks as ARES volunteers.  In this article from the Southgate Amateur Radio Club, we learn how radio amateurs belonging to Essex Ham and RAYNET helped provide communications for an evacuation of Jaywick on 12 January 2017.

Essex Ham members worked with UK’s Environment Agency to set up and staff a series of cross-band repeaters to facilitate communications between evacuation shelters and command centers.  The effort was supported by 16 Essex Ham members who provided the needed communications backup for first responders and other emergency personnel.

The Southgate Amateur Radio Club sums up the effort here:

“The team expended a total of 332 man hours over the two days. Mobile phone coverage in parts of the affected area was not great, and had the worst happened, it would likely have been necessary for a significant amount of message handling to be done by the RAYNET team. Numerous important messages were passed by RAYNET during the operation, and operators were able to keep council official and volunteers aware of events taking place at other key locations without tying up landline and mobiles.

Incidents like this serve to highlight the need for volunteers to be available to assist communities in times of need. If you have an amateur radio licence, volunteering for RAYNET is a great way to put your skills to good use. Although emergencies requiring RAYNET are fortunately few in the country, RAYNET supports many community events and charity fundraisers throughout the year, which not only provide a valuable service to the community, but help RAYNET members hone their message handling skills and test the network’s infrastructure.

For more about Essex RAYNET, go to www.essexraynet.org.uk…”

This is an excellent example of how radio amateurs serve their communities in times of disaster or emergency.


For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please check the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily.

For more Amateur Radio-related news, please visit these sites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.

https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com.

https://bigislandarrlnews.wordpress.com (this site).

https://kh6jrm.blogspot.com (Simple Ham Radio Antennas).

http://hawaiisciencedigest.com (latest science and technology news for radio amateurs).

Please send your Hawaii Island Amateur Radio news to kh6jrm@arrl.net at least two weeks prior to your event so I can notify our local prints and broadcast media in a timely manner.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de

Russell Roberts (KH6JRM)

Public Information Coordinator

Hawaii Island, ARRL Pacific Section

ARES Manual, March 2015 (latest edition).


Big Island ARRL News, 16 January 2017, 04:10 hrs, UTC, Post #96

Source:

http://www.arrl.org/files/file/Public%20Service/ARES/ARESmanual2015.pdf

Please click link to read and download the current edition of the ARES Manual, dated March 2015.

Comment:

The ARRL website contains a wealth of knowledge for the radio amateur with topics covering equipment reviews, technical tips, projects, news, upcoming events, contests, dx-peditions, conventions, and public service.

It’s the area of public service that caught my attention today as I was looking for material on ARES (Amateur Radio Emergency Service).  I stumbled across the current addition of the ARES Manual and was surprised just how detailed the document is.  Because Hawaii is prone to a variety of natural disasters such as tsunamis, volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, and even choking vog, it behooves radio amateurs in Hawaii to be prepared to render communications service in times of emergency.  Much of our response is done by volunteer radio amateurs belong to ARES and other emergency communications agencies.

I’ve attached a web address which can be used to download all 85 pages of this important document.  A lot of time and effort went into this publication, which covers everything from the ARES mission, training, and interaction with partner agencies to the memoranda of understanding between the ARRL and served agencies, such as the American Red Cross.  The manual also includes the various forms used with the Incident Command System (ICS).  When you become an ARES volunteer, you will be expected to know how the ICS works and your special relationship with served agencies.

Take some time to read this document.  It will become a valuable part of your training as an ARES volunteer.


For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please check the blog sidebar. These news feeds are updated daily.

You can visit these sites to get more Amateur Radio-related information:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.

https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com.

https://bigislandarrlnews.wordpress.com (this site).

http://www.kh6jrm.info (breaking news for radio amateurs).

http://hawaiisciencedigest.com (latest science and technology news for radio amateurs).

Please submit your Hawaii Island Amateur Radio news items to kh6jrm@arrl.net at least two weeks prior to your event so I can notify local print and broadcast media in a timely manner.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de

Russell Roberts (KH6JRM)

Public Information Coordinator

Hawaii County, ARRL Pacific Section

ARRL Letter, 12 January 2017.


Big Island ARRL News, 13 January 2017, 19:55 hrs, UTC, Post #94.

Source:

http://www.arrl.org/arrlletter?issue=2017-01-12

Accessed on 13 January 2017, 19:55 hrs, UTC.

Editor:  Rick Lindquist (WW1ME).

Please click link to read the full article.

Comment:

The “ARRL Letter” compiles and distributes news and information to radio amateurs belonging to the ARRL (American Radio Relay League).  Editor Rick Lindquist (WW1ME) does an excellent job of selecting key topics of importance for licensed amateur radio operators, including technological breakthroughs, equipment reviews, dx-peditions, propagation forecasts, contests, FCC actions, and upcoming conventions and forums.

Here are topics covered in the 12 January 2017 issue of the “ARRL Letter”:

The ARRL Contest Update, 11 January 2017.


Big Island ARRL News, 13 January 2017, 05:55 hrs, UTC, Post #93.

Source:

http://www.arrl.org/the-arrl-contest-update-issues?issue=2017-01-11

Editor:  Brian Moran (N9ADG).

Accessed on 13 January 2017, 05:55 hrs, UTC.

Please click link to read the current contest update from the ARRL.

Comment:

Although contesting isn’t everybody’s “cup of tea”, the discipline of working through a contest and its protocols provides excellent practice and training for radio amateurs involved in ARES, RACES, SATERN, MARS, and other emergency communications services.

I’ll admit that I’m not a “die-hard” contest participant, but I do drop into a few contests just to see if I can handle the fast pace of contacts and get basic information correct–skills needed in an emergency situation. My admiration goes to those who can keep up the pace for hours on end and still finish the event in good spirits.  Contests also provide a convenient way to work on several ARRL and IARU awards while you fine tune your communications skills.

Here are the top stories that editor Brian Moran (N9ADG) has assembled for your review:

“IN THIS ISSUE

Online CW Course offered by Alan (AD6E).


Big Island ARRL News, 11 January 2017, 06:20 hrs, UTC, Post #92.

Source:

https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com/2017/01/10/cw-ops-learning-morse-code-in-an-on-line-class-session-part-1/

Accessed on 11 January 2017, 06:20 hrs, UTC.

Reporter:  Darren Holbrook (KH6OWL), ARRL PIO-Oahu.

Please click link to read Darren’s experience with an online cw course.

Comment:

In this well-crafted post, Darren (KH6OWL) begins a series of articles on his experiences with an online cw course taught by Alan (AD6E).  Alan has offered this course since 2012 in a variety of formats, including online, skype, and downloadable software. I wish I had this course when I was working on my morse code requirement as a budding novice operator.  Back in the day (1977), a morse code requirement existed for all classes of amateur radio licenses, with 5 wpm being the minimum requirement for novices.  General Class and Advanced licensees had to pass a 13 wpm test, while Amateur Extra hopefuls had to master 20 wpm.

Over the span of time, the cw requirements were reduced and eventually eliminated from all classes of amateur radio licenses.  However, the popularity of morse code continued to rise after it was no longer required.  Although I passed the 13 wpm requirement to secure an Advanced Amateur Radio License, I never really used code very much.  By the time I took the Extra Class test in 2004, the code requirement, then reduced to 5 wpm and eventually to no code at all, was almost a memory.  In the intervening years, I grew to prefer this mode because of its simplicity, efficiency, and general politeness of most cw operators. Plus, cw doesn’t require expensive equipment to get on the air.

And now, operators such as Darren (KH6OWL0 are finding morse code an attractive alternative to the crowded and often intemperate conditions on the ssb portions of most amateur radio bands.

In this post, Darren describes his efforts to become proficient in the original digital communications mode. As many of us have found out, there is a learning curve to digest, but after some practice (about 30-60 minutes a day) with the online course, you will gain confidence and appreciation for Samuel F.B. Morse‘s communication idea.  Once you get accustomed to the sound and rhythm of cw, you’ll find many great contacts on the cw portions of the amateur radio bands, including the usually busy 30 meter band.

Darren will keep us posted on his progress in subsequent articles.  You may even want to enroll in the course to improve your cw proficiency.


For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.

https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com.

https://bigislandarrlnews.wordpress.com (this site).

https://kh6jrm.blogspot.com (Simple Ham Radio Antennas).

http://www.kh6jrm.info (breaking news for radio amateurs).

http://hawaiisciencedigest.com (latest science and technology news for radio amateurs).

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM)

Public Information Coordinator

Hawaii Island, ARRL Pacific Section

Amateur Radio headed to Pickaway-Ross.


Big Island ARRL News, 08 January 2017, 15:45 hrs, UTC, Post #91.

Source:

http://www.chillicothegazette.com/story/news/local/2017/01/06/amateur-radio-headed-pickaway-ross/96210136/

Accessed on 08 January 2017, 15:45 hrs, UTC.

Reporter:  Chris Balusik.

Please click link to read the full story.

Comment:

Here’s another example of how the media can put a positive spin on Amateur Radio activities.  In this report from “The Chillicothe Gazette“, Chris Balusik does an excellent job of describing how the ARRL supports the education and career interests of young people by providing equipment, guidance, and support to a local Ohio technology training center.

The Pickaway-Ross Career and Technology Center was one of four schools to receive an ARRL Education & Technology Program Grant.  Science instructor David Pentecost (KC8WEB) wanted funds for amateur radio station equipment “with the intent of augmenting the engineering program and attracting interested students into the world of wireless communication and other related technologies.”

Pentecost tells reporter Chris Balusik that the ARRL grant will open new career choices for students:

“For a student, it’s learning about the electromagnetic spectrum and how it works, that would probably be the primary scientific benefit,” he said.

“It also will expose students to what makes wireless technology work, allow them to explore more deeply into the world of electronics and basic radio system operations and give some the opportunity to earn one of three levels of FCC amateur radio licenses. The first level of licensure is a technician license, which allows the holder to broadcast within a specific range of higher frequencies. The next step up would be a general license, which adds more frequencies to the list, with the highest licensure level being an extra license that permits broadcasting on all frequencies.

Pentecost’s hope is that many in the first class of juniors to go through the program will earn their technician license, then as seniors will not only earn their general license but also encourage a new crop of juniors to get excited about the program to help build it beyond the initial three-year period.”


The ARRL Education & Technology Grants are an excellent use of the dues and contributions you make to maintain your membership in the ARRL.

The article by reporter Chris Balusik is clear, concise, and accurate.

If you have an article about some phase of Amateur Radio involving a radio amateur on Hawaii Island, please send your item to kh6jrm@arrl.net so I can relay it to our local print and broadcast media.

For more Amateur Radio news and information, please visit these sites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.

https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com.

https://bigislandarrlnews.wordpress.com (this site).

http://www.kh6jrm.info (breaking news of interest to radio amateurs).

http://kh6jrm.blogspot.com (Simple Ham Radio Antennas).

http://hawaiisciencedigest.com (science and technology news for radio amateurs).

For the latest ARRL news, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are updated daily.

Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM)

Russell Roberts (KH6JRM)

Public Information Coordinator

Hawaii County, ARRL Pacific Section