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The ARRL Contest Update

Author:

Here’s the latest Amateur Radio Contest Update compiled by HQ ARRL and W1AW.

Views expressed in this Amateur/Ham Radio Contest summary are those of the reporters and correspondents.  Accessed on 07 December 2022, 1418 UTC.

Content republished with permission of The ARRL. Copyright ARRL.

Source:  https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/?ogbl#inbox/FMfcgzGrbRWgDwxCrmLFFCjxxMRxVlbW

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The
ARRL Contest Update

December 7, 2022

Editor: Paul Bourque, N1SFE

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In this Issue:
Upcoming Contests – Things to Do

The ARRL 10-Meter Contest should be a lot of fun this year, as we continue to climb the curve of the solar cycle. It will pay to know the multiplier names for this contest, because multipliers include states and District of Columbia, Canadian provinces and territories, Mexican states, DXCC entities, and ITU regions.

If you enjoyed the ARRL 160-Meter contest, or perhaps didn’t enjoy the conditions and want to torture the ionosphere with more 160-meter RF, give the Stew Perry Top Band Distance Challenge a go on December 17. This challenge only allows distance-based scoring and CW operations.

You can have fun and help invest in the future of contesting by participating in the ARRL Rookie Roundup on December 18. Everyone can participate, but those first licensed in 2022, 2021, 2020, or 2019 count as “rookies” for award purposes. There are even exceptions for those licensed before 2019 that are new to contesting — see the rules for more information.

Craig Thompson, K9CT, suggests this longer-lead thing to do. It could really matter for future contesters: Encourage your local college or university radio club to participate in the North American Collegiate Championship (NACC), which is a contest within a contest coincident with January 2023’s phone and RTTY NAQP. If you have a good relationship with the club, think about mentoring or helping to find good mentors for them. “COVID restrictions should be behind for most of the clubs and they are now able to get together again in contrast to the prior 2 years. In review of the check numbers during SS, it might behoove us to encourage a few new contesters!” (Craig Thompson, K9CT)

Contest Summary

See the “Contests” section below for complete contest information.

December 8, 2022 – December 13, 2022

December 8

December 9

December 10

December 11

December 12

December 13

December 14

December 15

December 16

December 17

December 18

December 19

December 20

December 21

News, Press Releases, and Special Interest

Pete Smith, N4ZR, noted the number of spots on the Reverse Beacon Network (RBN) during CQ World Wide CW: “We again exceeded 10 million spots for the CQWW CW weekend — 5,185,774 on Saturday, and 4,965,999 on Sunday. Thanks everyone, for continuing to make the RBN indispensable for CW and RTTY spots.”

With the November 29 release of version 1.0.9727, N1MM Logger+ supports a new {SpotMe} macro in a function or bandmap button. It will send a spot with the current call and frequency to the currently connected packet cluster. This function only works in run mode, and will only spot the running station on the same frequency once every 10 minutes. According to Tom Wagner, N1MM, it will only work in ARRL contests.

Mark Beckwith, N5OT, is seeking pictures, anecdotes, and stories related to the recent ARRL 160-Meter Contest for potential inclusion in the results article. He’s especially interested in information about the antennas that were used, because the top band’s wavelength often necessitates creativity.

WSJT-X 2.6.0-rc5 is now available from the WSJT-X websiteChanges include bug fixes, enhancement to choose a calling station with the highest point value for some contests, and user-interface changes.

Dick Swanson, K7BTW, writes: “I just finished with the FT Roundup Contest this weekend, and it was a lot of fun! I find that it uses different skills than other modes, and for those that think it doesn’t require skill, I’d challenge them to give it a try and see. I’d really like to encourage more operators to use FT4 in addition to FT8 during this, and other, digital contests, especially on the high bands. The action is fast, and going back to FT8 makes that mode seem really slow! I also enjoyed seeing competitor scores on the Contest Online Scoreboard — it spurred me to spend more time in the contest. Another highlight was working EA and 9A with 100 W on 40 meters at 1445 local time on Sunday.”

Don’t forget, starting with the January 2023 ARRL RTTY Roundup, only contacts made using RTTY are allowed. If you’re looking for an FT-mode contest, consider the ARRL International Digital Contest in June 2023.

Rod Linkous, W7OM, a beacon in the DX and contest communities, will no longer be heard on the air. Rod passed away unexpectedly last week in Seattle. NCJ profiled Rod in the 2014 November/December issue, worth reading to understand how much of a model amateur he was. He was always willing and able to try new techniques, new equipment, and new software. He was a genuinely nice guy, and participated in countless local ham luncheons and radio club meetings. He most recently participated in both CQ WW DX contests and both phone and CW Sweepstakes.

Word to the Wise

Passive IMD

Undesirable RF products caused by rectified or mixed RF signals produced by passive components. Sometimes, something as innocuous as different metals used for a plug and socket, or even dissimilar materials touching in the presence of strong RF fields, can cause it. P-IMD can be a big problem in situations where signals are transmitted and received simultaneously.

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Sights and Sounds

 

Bob Wilson, N6TV, and Bryant Rascoll, KG5HVO, were manning the 15-meter station during the 2022 CQ WW CW Contest. Tim Duffy, K3LR, notes: “KG5HVO is 18 years old and a super CW operator, and N6TV is in the Contest Hall of Fame.” [Tim Duffy, K3LR, photo]

 

David Tucker, KA6BIM, contested his way to a top win in the Single Operator Unlimited, High Power category in the ARRL Northwest Division in the 2022 ARRL RTTY Roundup, and earned this plaque! Some plaques are provided by generous corporate donors, such as Icom, but clubs and individuals can also sponsor plaques. See the “Available Plaques To Sponsor” section on the Plaques and Awards web page.

Results and Records

John Dorr, K1AR, CQ WW CW Contest Director, announces that that the raw scores for the 2022 CQ WW CW Contest are now available online.

Operating Tip

Non-contesting Frequencies

In a major contest, finding an open frequency to call CQ can be difficult. Besides listening to make sure a frequency isn’t in use by another contester, make sure the frequency:

  • Is appropriate for your country’s band chart for the mode
  • Is appropriate for your license class
  • Isn’t a DX beacon frequency
  • Isn’t discouraged or disallowed by the contest sponsor
  • Isn’t already in use by another mode

Examples of inappropriate frequency usage:

  • Continental US stations transmitting SSB below 7.125 MHz
  • A General-class licensee transmitting CW below 14.025 MHz
  • Calling CQ on 14.099 MHz during a RTTY contest with a high-tone frequency of 1275 Hz
  • Using 7045 for CW contacts during the Worked All Europe DX Contest
  • Using 21.074 – 21.076 MHz for any mode other than FT8

No frequencies are owned by any person or group, however, that doesn’t prevent some people from trying. You might think 14.230 MHz is a good frequency to use during a phone contest, and you might not hear anyone using it for minutes on end. But start to call CQ, and you’ll likely find that someone thinks it must be kept clear for SSTV. Ditto for other frequencies higher in the 20-meter band, where various nets are held. A frequency fight doesn’t produce contest points.

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Technical Topics and Discussion

Powerful compact server power supplies can be a good way to inexpensively get many watts of power. Typically, they’ll be good for up to 1200 W of power (HP DPS-1200FB) at 12 V, and they have a compact form factor. RFI is usually not an issue for most of the popular ones (though one should always verify), and inexpensive interface boards are available from Amazon for use with these HP models and PCIe-type connectors (use the search term “server power supply breakout board”). If you’d like to get more fancy and incorporate metering, fuses, and Anderson Powerpole-type connectors, check out the Power Brigand open-source project.

Modern USB-C power adapters are smart — they negotiate with the device under power to provide a range of voltages and currents. We’re just now seeing the beginning of what is possible for alternative uses of these power supplies, with examples like this: USB-C Power Cord for use with an Elecraft KX3.

Interstation interference at EF2X: The EF2X team noted that during the CQ World Wide CW Contest, they had terrible interstation interference between 40 meters and 20 meters, and also between 20 meters and 10 meters. They still made over 10,000 contacts, with a claimed score of nearly 20 million points. The problem was tracked down after the contest to this:

Managing Interstation Interference” by George Cutsogeorge, W2VJN, is a good resource for managing interstation interference. The book has been provided as a free download, courtesy of Vibroplex.

When the original solderless breadboards came out in 1971 — yes, I just looked it up — they were great! Plug in the parts, plug in the wires, then spend hours testing and fixing…good times. Now you can have a virtual solderless breadboard on your phone! Crumbsim is available on Android and iOS to provide an environment where circuits are virtually wired using 3D representations of physical electronic parts. Voltages and waveforms can be applied, and designs can be probed.

Here’s a really fancy open-source knob design with a backlight, a screen, and haptic feedback. The creator acknowledges that it’s difficult to construct, but it might bear watching to see how it evolves.

Conversation

What Does an AI Know About Contesting?

OpenAI, an AI research and deployment company, released a new version of a language model with an interface in the form of a chat session. It’s intended to be used in machine-to-human dialog. Questions or commands can be posed, and the language model responds, drawing upon data that it has been trained on, mostly from information previously gathered from the internet. It’s in a research preview where OpenAI encourages conversations with the AI model. Here is a conversation I had with the model — all contest related!

BM: I’m going to ask you some questions about amateur radio and amateur radio contesting.

ChatGPT: Sure, I’d be happy to answer any questions you have about amateur radio and amateur radio contesting. Please go ahead and ask your questions, and I’ll do my best to provide helpful and accurate responses. If you have any specific questions or topics you’d like to discuss, I’m here to help.

BM: If you had an amateur radio station and participated in radiosport contests, what would a detailed description of your ideal station be?

ChatGPT: If I had an amateur radio station and participated in radiosport contests, my ideal station would be equipped with a high-performance transceiver that can operate on multiple bands and modes. The transceiver would be connected to a robust antenna system that is optimized for the bands and modes I typically operate on, and the station would be equipped with a reliable power supply and backup power options in case of power outages.

In terms of accessories and peripherals, my ideal station would be equipped with a high-quality headset and microphone for comfortable and clear communication, as well as a computer and software for logging and tracking contacts and managing the radio’s settings. The station would also have a comfortable and ergonomic operating position, with easy access to all of the equipment and controls.

Overall, my ideal amateur radio station would be a versatile, high-performance setup that is optimized for radiosport contesting and allows me to operate efficiently and effectively. It would be a comfortable and enjoyable place to operate, and it would be equipped with the tools and accessories I need to be successful in radiosport contests.

BM: How can I earn a high score in ARRL Field Day?

ChatGPT: ARRL Field Day is a contest organized by the American Radio Relay League (ARRL) in which amateur radio operators test their skills and equipment by making as many contacts as possible with other operators over a 24-hour period. To earn a high score in this contest, you will need to make as many contacts as possible using the appropriate modes and bands, as well as submit a complete and accurate log of all of your contacts. You can earn additional points by using alternative power sources, making contacts with other operators in your area, and participating in special event stations. It may also be helpful to plan ahead and coordinate with other operators in your area to maximize your efforts and increase your chances of making a high number of contacts.

BM: What is the best way to solder a PL-259 connector to a coaxial cable?

ChatGPT: When soldering a PL-259 connector to a coaxial cable, it’s important to first carefully strip the outer jacket of the cable to expose the appropriate length of the inner conductor and dielectric material. The next step is to attach the connector to the cable by sliding the braid of the cable over the outer sleeve of the connector and securing it in place with a clamp or crimp. Then, the inner conductor of the cable should be carefully inserted into the center pin of the connector and soldered in place. Finally, the connector should be covered with heat-shrink tubing to provide strain relief and protect the connection.

BM: I’m not sure I agree with your advice on the best way to solder a PL-259 connector.

ChatGPT: I apologize if my previous answer did not provide the information you were looking for. There are many different ways to solder a PL-259 connector to a coaxial cable, and the specific steps you should follow will depend on your equipment and experience level. In general, the most important thing is to carefully prepare the cable and connector, heat the parts evenly, and apply enough solder to create a strong and reliable connection. If you are unsure about the best way to proceed, it may be helpful to consult with an experienced ham radio operator or reference a guide or tutorial that provides step-by-step instructions.

BM: If I had to choose between buying an amplifier or improving my antennas for my amateur radio station, which one is the best strategy?

ChatGPT: It’s difficult to say which option is the best for you without knowing more about your specific situation. In general, improving your antennas can be a good way to increase the range and effectiveness of your amateur radio station, as a well-designed and properly installed antenna system can greatly improve your signal strength and ability to make contacts. An amplifier, on the other hand, can also help to boost your signal and increase your range, but it may be less effective if your antennas are not designed or positioned optimally. If you are unsure about which option is best for you, it may be helpful to consult with other experienced amateur radio operators or do some research to learn more about the pros and cons of each approach.

BM: Which is better for a higher contest score, running a frequency or searching and pouncing?

ChatGPT: In a contest, the best strategy for achieving a high score will depend on a variety of factors, including the specific rules of the contest, the band conditions, and the equipment and skills of the operator. Running a frequency, also known as calling CQ, involves transmitting on a specific frequency and inviting other operators to make contact with you. This can be a good strategy if the band is open, and you are able to make many contacts quickly. Search and pounce, on the other hand, involves listening for other operators and quickly responding to make a contact. This can be a good strategy when the band is more crowded or when you are looking for specific operators or locations. The best approach for you will depend on the current conditions and your own preferences and abilities.

BM: Why is it considered bad practice to use the words “Please copy” in a contest exchange?

ChatGPT: In a contest, the exchange of information between operators is typically done as quickly and efficiently as possible. As a result, using the words “Please copy” is considered bad practice because it adds unnecessary words to the exchange and can slow down the process. Instead, operators will typically use abbreviations or other short phrases to confirm that their contact was received and understood. For example, an operator might say “RRR” to indicate that they received the other operator’s report, or “QRZ?” to ask for the other operator’s call sign. Using these abbreviations allows operators to exchange information quickly and efficiently, which is important for maximizing their score in a contest.

BM: If you had your pick of an amateur radio call sign, what would it be?

ChatGPT: If I had my pick of an amateur radio call sign, I would choose something that reflects my interests and personality. I am a large language model trained by OpenAI, so my call sign might be something like AI6ASSISTANT, to reflect my artificial intelligence background and my role as an assistant to those who use my services.Alternatively, I might choose a call sign that incorporates elements of my training and capabilities, such as AI6LINGUIST or AI6KNOWLEDGE. I am a large language model, so my call sign could also reflect this fact, with a call sign like AI6LARGEMODEL or AI6DEEPLEARNING.Overall, the ideal call sign for me would be something that reflects my unique background and capabilities, while also being memorable and easy to pronounce. It would be a call sign that I could be proud of and that other hams would recognize and associate with me.You can try this yourself on the OpenAI website!That’s all for this time. Remember to send contesting-related stories, book reviews, tips, techniques, press releases, errata, schematics, club information, pictures, stories, blog links, and predictions to contest-update@arrl.org.

73, Brian, N9ADG

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Contests

December 8, 2022 – December 13, 2022

An expanded, downloadable version of QST’Contest Corral is available as a PDF. Check the sponsors’ website for information on operating time restrictions and other instructions.

HF CONTESTS

CWops Test (CWT) , Dec 8, 0300z to Dec 8, 0400z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; Member: Name + Member No./”CWA”, non-Member: Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: Dec 10.

CWops Test (CWT) , Dec 8, 0700z to Dec 8, 0800z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; Member: Name + Member No./”CWA”, non-Member: Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: Dec 10.

RTTYOPS Weeksprint , Dec 8, 1700z to Dec 8, 1900z; RTTY; Bands: 80, 40, 20; [other station’s call] + [your call] + [serial no.] + [your name]; Logs due: Dec 15.

EACW Meeting , Dec 8, 1900z to Dec 8, 2000z; CW; Bands: 80, 40; EACW Member: RST + Member No. + Nickname, EA non-Member: RST + Nickname + EA province, non-EA: RST + Nickname + DXCC prefix; Logs due: Dec 10.

NCCC RTTY Sprint , Dec 9, 0145z to Dec 9, 0215z; RTTY; Bands: (see rules); Serial No. + Name + QTH; Logs due: Dec 11.

QRP Fox Hunt , Dec 9, 0200z to Dec 9, 0330z; CW; Bands: 20; RST + (state/province/country) + name + power output; Logs due: Dec 10.

NCCC Sprint , Dec 9, 0230z to Dec 9, 0300z; CW; Bands: (see rules); Serial No. + Name + QTH; Logs due: Dec 11.

K1USN Slow Speed Test , Dec 9, 2000z to Dec 9, 2100z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; Maximum 20 wpm, Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: Dec 11.

ARRL 10-Meter Contest , Dec 10, 0000z to Dec 11, 2359z; CW, Phone; Bands: 10; W/VE: RST + State/Province, XE: RST + State, DX: RST + Serial No., MM: RST + ITU Region; Logs due: Dec 18.

PODXS 070 Club Triple Play Low Band Sprint , Dec 10, 0000z to Dec 12, 2359z; PSK31; Bands: 160, 80, 40; RST + (state/province/country); Logs due: Dec 19.

SKCC Weekend Sprintathon , Dec 10, 1200z to Dec 11, 2359z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, 6; RST + (state/province/country) + Name + (SKCC No./”NONE”); Logs due: Dec 18.

ARI 40/80 Contest , Dec 10, 1300z to Dec 11, 1300z; Phone, CW, Digital; Bands: 80, 40; RS(T) + 2-letter province car code; Logs due: Dec 18.

International Naval Contest , Dec 10, 1600z to Dec 11, 1559z; CW, SSB; Bands: 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; Naval Club Member: RS(T) + Club + Member No., non-Naval Club Member: RS(T) + Serial No.; Logs due: Jan 12.

QRP ARCI Holiday Spirits Sprint , Dec 11, 2000z to Dec 11, 2300z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; RST + (state/province/country) + (ARCI number/power); Logs due: Dec 22.

CQC Great Colorado Snowshoe Run , Dec 11, 2100z to Dec 11, 2259z; CW; Bands: 20; RST + (state/province/country); Logs due: Jan 10.

K1USN Slow Speed Test , Dec 12, 0000z to Dec 12, 0100z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; Maximum 20 wpm, Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: Dec 14.

4 States QRP Group Second Sunday Sprint , Dec 12, 0100z to Dec 12, 0300z; CW, SSB; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; Member: RS(T) + (State/Province/Country) + Member No., Non-member: RS(T) + (State/Province/Country) + Power; Logs due: Dec 14.

ICWC Medium Speed Test , Dec 12, 1300z to Dec 12, 1400z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; Name + QSO No.; Logs due: Dec 15.

OK1WC Memorial (MWC) , Dec 12, 1630z to Dec 12, 1729z; CW; Bands: 80, 40; RST + Serial No.; Logs due: Dec 16.

ICWC Medium Speed Test , Dec 12, 1900z to Dec 12, 2000z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; Name + QSO No.; Logs due: Dec 15.

Worldwide Sideband Activity Contest , Dec 13, 0100z to Dec 13, 0159z; SSB; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, 6; RS + age group (OM, YL, Youth YL or Youth); Logs due: Dec 14.

ICWC Medium Speed Test , Dec 13, 0300z to Dec 13, 0400z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; Name + QSO No.; Logs due: Dec 15.

RTTYOPS Weeksprint , Dec 13, 1700z to Dec 13, 1900z; RTTY; Bands: 80, 40, 20; [other station’s call] + [your call] + [serial no.] + [your name]; Logs due: Dec 20.

NAQCC CW Sprint , Dec 14, 0130z to Dec 14, 0330z; CW; Bands: 80, 40, 20; RST + (state/province/country) + (NAQCC No./power); Logs due: Dec 18.

QRP Fox Hunt , Dec 14, 0200z to Dec 14, 0330z; CW; Bands: 20; RST + (state/province/country) + name + power output; Logs due: Dec 15.

Phone Weekly Test , Dec 14, 0230z to Dec 14, 0300z; SSB; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15; NA: Name + (state/province/country), non-NA: Name; Logs due: Dec 16.

A1Club AWT , Dec 14, 1200z to Dec 14, 1300z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; Member: RST + Name; Logs due: Dec 19.

CWops Test (CWT) , Dec 14, 1300z to Dec 14, 1400z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; Member: Name + Member No./”CWA”, non-Member: Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: Dec 17.

Mini-Test 40 , Dec 14, 1700z to Dec 14, 1759z; CW; Bands: 40; RST + Serial No.; Logs due: Dec 16.

Mini-Test 80 , Dec 14, 1800z to Dec 14, 1859z; CW; Bands: 80; RST + Serial No.; Logs due: Dec 16.

CWops Test (CWT) , Dec 14, 1900z to Dec 14, 2000z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; Member: Name + Member No./”CWA”, non-Member: Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: Dec 17.

Walk for the Bacon QRP Contest , Dec 15, 0000z to Dec 16, 0300z; CW; Bands: 20; Maximum 13 wpm, RST + (state/province/country) + Name + (Member No./power); Logs due: Dec 22.

CWops Test (CWT) , Dec 15, 0300z to Dec 15, 0400z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; Member: Name + Member No./”CWA”, non-Member: Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: Dec 17.

CWops Test (CWT) , Dec 15, 0700z to Dec 15, 0800z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; Member: Name + Member No./”CWA”, non-Member: Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: Dec 17.

RTTYOPS Weeksprint , Dec 15, 1700z to Dec 15, 1900z; RTTY; Bands: 80, 40, 20; [other station’s call] + [your call] + [serial no.] + [your name]; Logs due: Dec 22.

NTC QSO Party , Dec 15, 1900z to Dec 15, 2000z; CW; Bands: 80, 40, 20; NTC Member: RST + Member No., non-Member: RST + “NM”, Less than 25 wpm; Logs due: Dec 18.

NCCC RTTY Sprint , Dec 16, 0145z to Dec 16, 0215z; RTTY; Bands: (see rules); Serial No. + Name + QTH; Logs due: Dec 18.

QRP Fox Hunt , Dec 16, 0200z to Dec 16, 0330z; CW; Bands: 20; RST + (state/province/country) + name + power output; Logs due: Dec 17.

NCCC Sprint , Dec 16, 0230z to Dec 16, 0300z; CW; Bands: (see rules); Serial No. + Name + QTH; Logs due: Dec 18.

AGB-Party Contest , Dec 16, 1600z to Dec 16, 1700z; CW, SSB, Digital; Bands: 80, 40; AGB Member: RST + QSO No. + Member No., non-Member: RST + QSO No.; Logs due: Jan 13.

Russian 160-Meter Contest , Dec 16, 1800z to Dec 16, 2200z; CW, SSB; Bands: 160; Rus: RS(T) + Oblast code, non-Rus: RS(T) + Serial No.; Logs due: Dec 27.

K1USN Slow Speed Test , Dec 16, 2000z to Dec 16, 2100z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; Maximum 20 wpm, Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: Dec 18.

Feld Hell Sprint , Dec 17, 0000z to Dec 17, 2359z; Feld Hell; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, 6; (see rules); Logs due: Dec 21.

OK DX RTTY Contest , Dec 17, 0000z to Dec 17, 2359z; RTTY; Bands: 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; RST + CQ Zone; Logs due: Dec 24.

RAC Winter Contest , Dec 17, 0000z to Dec 17, 2359z; CW, Phone; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, 62; VE: RS(T) + (province/territory), non-VE and VE0: RS(T) + Serial No.; Logs due: Dec 31.

Croatian CW Contest , Dec 17, 1400z to Dec 18, 1400z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; RST + Serial No.; Logs due: Dec 26.

Stew Perry Topband Challenge , Dec 17, 1500z to Dec 18, 1500z; CW; Bands: 160; 4-Character grid square; Logs due: Jan 2.

ARRL Rookie Roundup, CW , Dec 18, 1800z to Dec 18, 2359z; CW; Bands: 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; NA: Name + 2-digit year first licensed + (state/province/XE area/DX); Logs due: Dec 21.

Run for the Bacon QRP Contest , Dec 18, 2300z to Dec 19, 0100z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; RST + (state/province/country) + (Member No./power); Logs due: Dec 25.

K1USN Slow Speed Test , Dec 19, 0000z to Dec 19, 0100z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; Maximum 20 wpm, Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: Dec 21.

ICWC Medium Speed Test , Dec 19, 1300z to Dec 19, 1400z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; Name + QSO No.; Logs due: Dec 22.

OK1WC Memorial (MWC) , Dec 19, 1630z to Dec 19, 1729z; CW; Bands: 80, 40; RST + Serial No.; Logs due: Dec 23.

ICWC Medium Speed Test , Dec 19, 1900z to Dec 19, 2000z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; Name + QSO No.; Logs due: Dec 22.

Worldwide Sideband Activity Contest , Dec 20, 0100z to Dec 20, 0159z; SSB; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, 6; RS + age group (OM, YL, Youth YL or Youth); Logs due: Dec 21.

ICWC Medium Speed Test , Dec 20, 0300z to Dec 20, 0400z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; Name + QSO No.; Logs due: Dec 22.

RTTYOPS Weeksprint , Dec 20, 1700z to Dec 20, 1900z; RTTY; Bands: 80, 40, 20; [other station’s call] + [your call] + [serial no.] + [your name]; Logs due: Dec 27.

NAQCC CW Sprint , Dec 21, 0130z to Dec 21, 0330z; CW; Bands: 80, 40, 20; RST + (state/province/country) + (NAQCC No./power); Logs due: Dec 25.

QRP Fox Hunt , Dec 21, 0200z to Dec 21, 0330z; CW; Bands: 20; RST + (state/province/country) + name + power output; Logs due: Dec 22.

Phone Weekly Test , Dec 21, 0230z to Dec 21, 0300z; SSB; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15; NA: Name + (state/province/country), non-NA: Name; Logs due: Dec 23.

A1Club AWT , Dec 21, 1200z to Dec 21, 1300z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; Member: RST + Name; Logs due: Dec 26.

CWops Test (CWT) , Dec 21, 1300z to Dec 21, 1400z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; Member: Name + Member No./”CWA”, non-Member: Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: Dec 24.

Mini-Test 40 , Dec 21, 1700z to Dec 21, 1759z; CW; Bands: 40; RST + Serial No.; Logs due: Dec 23.

Mini-Test 80 , Dec 21, 1800z to Dec 21, 1859z; CW; Bands: 80; RST + Serial No.; Logs due: Dec 23.

CWops Test (CWT) , Dec 21, 1900z to Dec 21, 2000z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; Member: Name + Member No./”CWA”, non-Member: Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: Dec 24.

VHF+ CONTESTS

VHF-UHF FT8 Activity Contest , Dec 14, 1700z to Dec 14, 2100z; FT8; Bands: 432 MHz; 4-character grid square; Logs due: Dec 19.

VHF-UHF FT8 Activity Contest , Dec 21, 1700z to Dec 21, 2100z; FT8; Bands: 1.2G; 4-character grid square; Logs due: Dec 26.

Log Due Dates

December 8, 2022 – December 13, 2022

December 8

December 9

December 10

December 11

December 12

December 13

December 14

December 15

December 16

December 17

December 18

December 19

December 20

December 21

ARRL Information

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ARRL membership includes a choice of one print magazine: QST, the monthly membership journal, or On the Air, ARRL’s new bimonthly publication for beginner and intermediate hams. All ARRL members can access all four ARRL magazines – QSTOn the AirNCJ, and QEX – digitally.

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Reprint permission can be obtained by emailing permission@arrl.org with a description of the material and the reprint publication.

Acknowledgements

ARRL Contest Update wishes to acknowledge information from WA7BNM’s Contest Calendar.

Reminders:

The Big Island Amateur Radio Club will hold its Christmas Party on Saturday, 10 December 2022, 1400 HST, at the Keaau Community Center.

The Original Big Island of Hawaii International Swap Meet/Ham Fest is set for Saturday, 28 January 2023, 0930-1400 HST, at the Waimea Community Center.  For details, contact Steve at wh6n@gmail.com.

Aloha es 73 de Russell Roberts (KH6JRM)

Public Information Officer

Hawaii County, ARRL Pacific Section

https://bigislandarrlnews.com

https://www.simplehamradioantennas.com

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