Here’s the latest Amateur Radio Contest News compiled by HQ ARRL.

Views expressed in this Amateur/Ham Radio News summary are those of the reporters and correspondents.

Accessed on 10 November 2021, 1313 UTC.

Content provided by HQ ARRL, Newington, CT, 06111.

Source:

http://www.arrl.org/contest-update-issues?issue=2021-11-10

Please click link or scroll down to read your selections.

November 10, 2021

Editor: Paul Bourque, N1SFE

IN THIS ISSUE

 

NEW HF OPERATORS — THINGS TO DO

This weekend on the radio is the RCA (Radio Club of America) Transatlantic QSO Party, 1200 UTC Saturday, November 13 to 0400Z Sunday, November 14. This event commemorates the 100th anniversary of the Transatlantic Tests successfully spanning the Atlantic Ocean from the United States to Scotland.

Open to ALL hams and shortwave listeners on 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, and 10 meters, with 10 bonus points awarded (per band and mode) for contacting Radio Club of America’s station, W2RCA. Scores should be posted to 3830 Scores. For rules, please visit the RCA Transatlantic Test Centenial webpage.

This is one of many events commemorating the event. ARRLAntique Wireless Association (AWA), The Radio Society of Great Britain (RSGB), and others all are participating throughout the months of November and December. Be sure to check their respective websites for any schedules and updates.

ARRL Phone Sweepstakes takes place from 2100 UTC, November 20 through 0259 UTC, November 22. If you’re new to HF operating and contesting, the contest can be challenging, as the exchange is a bit more complicated than other events. Be sure to check out the complete rules so that you’re familiar with the information to be exchanged. Sweepstakes is a great way complete your Worked All States (WAS) award. If there’s a few states you’re missing, stations from all 50 states and across Canada participate every year.

CONTEST SUMMARY

Complete information for all contests follows the Operating Tips section

Nov 11, 2021 – Nov 24, 2021

November 11

November 12

November 13

November 14

November 15

November 16

November 17

November 18

November 19

November 20

November 21

November 22

November 23

November 24

NEWS, PRESS RELEASES, AND GENERAL INTEREST

3M has issued a “Stop Use and Inspection Notice” for the 3M™ DBI-SALA® Nano-Lok™ Self-Retracting Lifeline with Anchor Hook.

The company advises owners to remove the anchor hook product from service until an inspection is performed. The notice pertains to “specific versions” of the anchor hook. “3M Fall Protection has identified a very low potential for the DBI-SALA® Nano-Lok™ Self-Retracting Lifeline with Anchor Hook to be assembled with an unformed top swivel eye rivet. An improperly formed rivet may become displaced from the top swivel eye. An unformed rivet may result in the SRL [Self-Retracting Lifeline] becoming detached from the anchor hook, which could result in severe injury or death,” 3M said. “Due to this, we are sending out an inspection notice so this issue can be detected by inspecting the self-retracting lifeline.”

More details are on the 3M website.

The International Amateur Radio Union Region 1 Monitoring System (IARUMS) reports in the September issue of the IARUMS newsletter that the Russian-Ukrainian “radio war” on and around 7055 kHz continues to be a major source of frustration. IARUMS Region 1 Coordinator Peter Jost, HB9CET, said the on-the-air conflict “has been bothering us to an unbearable extent for a very long time and is still continuing.”

Earlier this year, IARUMS reported that the Russian-Ukrainian radio war had escalated.

“In June, they used more frequencies than before, affecting our bands very hard.” Jost recounted. “It is a great annoyance and a big shame.” Jost has pointed out that the IARU Monitoring System has little opportunity to stop the on-the-air conflict.

“Only national authorities can hopefully do something against international complaints,” he said. “It is very important and very helpful that many other [IARU] member-societies also observe these frequencies and make complaints to their regulators.” The long-standing conflict has also affected 7050 and 7060 kHz.

The CME that hit Earth’s magnetic field on Oct. 31st at ~10:00 UT had a relatively weak impact–a far cry from the “big hit” we expected–and it sparked an equally weak G1-class geomagnetic storm. Luckily for participants in the CQ WW SSB contest held that weekend, it didn’t have the effect on the HF bands that was feared.

Spaceweather.com reported “In summary, the Halloween Storm of 2021 was more trick than treat. What happened? It’s possible that the bulk of the Oct. 28th CME simply missed our planet. The source of the CME, sunspot AR2887, is located in the sun’s southern hemisphere. When it exploded 3 days ago, much of the debris flew south of the sun-Earth line. Computer models suggesting a direct hit apparently gave too little weight to the CME’s asymmetry.”

WORD TO THE WISE

Coordinated Universal Time (UTC)

Coordinated Universal Time, or UTC, is the primary time standard by which the world regulates clocks and time. It is within about 1 second of mean solar time at 0° longitude and is not adjusted for daylight saving time. It is effectively a successor to Greenwich Mean Time (GMT).

You may be asking yourself why the abbreviation is “UTC” and not “CUT.” This abbreviation comes as a result of the International Telecommunication Union and the International Astronomical Union wanting to use the same abbreviation in all languages. English speakers originally proposed CUT (for “coordinated universal time”), while French speakers proposed TUC (for “temps universel coordonné”). The compromise that emerged was UTC.

SIGHTS AND SOUNDS

The view of the tower at KC1XX after ropes were installed on the lower 4-element, 40-meter beam to assist turning the antenna after their prop pitch rotor failed. The operators used the ropes to “help” rotate the antenna from EU to JA when needed during CQWW SSB 2021. Photo by Dave Pascoe, KM3T.

RESULTS AND RECORDS

Bill, K6WSC, informs us that the 2021 Arizona QSO Party Results are published and are available at the website.

“If you participated in the AZQP, don’t forget to print your own customized AZQP Certificate. Also, if you worked K7UGA, print your own customized Special Event Certificate honoring US Senator Barry M. Goldwater (SK). Likewise, if you worked ARRL Arizona Section Manager W7RAP and/or the W7A Bonus Station, you can print those certificates as well.

I hope you had great ham radio fun in the AZQP and look forward to your participation in the 2022 AZQP. 73, Bill, K6WSC — AZQP Chairman”

OPERATING TIPS

John “Bee” Bartscherer, N1GNV, shared 10 contesting tips for the new contester and those with lower power stations trying to compete with the “big gun” stations.

John writes:

“I’m at best a casual contester. My modest station includes a 100 W HF rig and a wire antenna up about 30 feet. Squarely in ‘peanut whistle’ territory, for sure, compared to many others. But I do enjoy getting on the air and working stations all over the US and the world. With just a bit of effort, you can often get your Worked All States, or DXCC Award, in a single weekend. If you’re new to HF, or contesting, here are 10 tips for you.

  1. Read the contest rules. Understand what bands you can use, what your entry category will be, and what the ‘exchange’ is. Simply, that’s the information you will give to the other station and he/she will give to you. Note that by tradition, in a contest everyone has a 59 or 599 signal.
  2. Get with the program. Specifically, a logging program. There are quite a few options out there. My personal choice is the N1MM Logger. It’s free and has an amazing array of features. It’s updated regularly and has an extremely active online support community. Most current logging software will interface with just about any modern HF radio.
  3. More Butt-in-Chair Operating-Time = more contacts. Turn off distractions like texting, Facebook, email, TV, broadcast radio, etc. Concentrate. But don’t forget to take breaks. For 5 minutes every hour, get up, stretch, get some fresh air and a glass of water or a cup of coffee.
  4. Set an achievable goal. Face it. If you’re not an experienced contester with a ‘big gun’ station (yet!) you’re not going to win. But you can certainly try to beat your score in last year’s contest. Try to work DXCC in a weekend, or outscore your buddy across town.
  5. Study propagation forecasts and get a sense of what bands are likely to be open to areas you want to work, and at what times. This will help you come up with a basic plan. But remember that band openings can occur at any time, so if you’re operating in a category that allows it, keep an eye on the DX cluster because those openings can often be brief but intense.
  6. Don’t waste time in pileups early in the contest, especially if you have a ‘little pistol’ station like mine. Sure, give those rare ones a call or two, you may get lucky. You’re competing with guys running plenty of power into big antennas. Go back to them later in the contest, after they’ve worked all the ‘big guns.’ Often enough they’ll be begging for contacts and you’ll work them easily.
  7. Work those mults! Most contests include ‘multipliers’ in their scoring system. Basically, your score is calculated like this: You get a set number of points for each contact. Then, depending on the contest, you get an additional mult for each new country, state, county, etc. that you work. Multiply your QSO points by the number of mults to calculate your total score. Working more mults makes a much bigger difference in your score than another contact in the same country or state. Again, read the rules for the contest you’re operating in.
  8. Know those knobs! Try to familiarize yourself with the controls on your radio. Just about every rig has an attenuator, a pre-amp, an RF gain control, and a noise blanker. Most also include an IF shift or pass-band tuning adjustment. An old trick that QRP (very low power) operators use is to turn OFF the pre-amp and turn ON some attenuation. That may seem counterintuitive, but now if a station is loud to you, the chances are much better that you’re also loud to them. Let their big antennas and high power do the ‘heavy lifting.’ Similarly, turning down your RF gain can knock down a nearby (in frequency) high-power station so that you can work a weaker station.
  9. Use standard phonetics. My call is N1GNV. Years ago, I enjoyed having a small vegetable garden. It was kind of fun to announce my call as ‘No One Grows Nicer Vegetables’ on the local repeater or among ham radio friends. In a contest, however, that only causes confusion and mistakes — and is considered poor practice. November One Golf November Victor is what the other guy is expecting to hear. In noisy or otherwise difficult conditions, I might say “Golf November Victor, Germany Norway Victoria” but that’s about it.
  10. Listen before you call. Make sure you’ve got the other station’s call and exchange. You can even pre-enter it in your logging software. Listen to his pattern. Does he say ‘QRZ?’ after each contact? You want to make sure you’re transmitting when he’s listening. Work him (making sure he’s got YOUR call correct!), hit enter, and he’s in your log. Move on to the next one.

Finally — this is a hobby. It’s supposed to be FUN!! Enjoy the contest, and I hope to work you on all the bands.”

That’s all for this time. Until then, keep your feet on the ground, and your antennas in the sky! Remember to send contesting related stories, book reviews, tips, techniques, press releases, errata, schematics, club information, pictures, stories, blog links, and predictions to contest-update@arrl.org

73, Paul, N1SFE

CONTESTS

Nov 11, 2021 – Nov 24, 2021

An expanded, downloadable version of QST’Contest Corral is available as a PDF. Check the sponsors’ website for information on operating time restrictions and other instructions.

HF CONTESTS

CWops Mini-CWT Test, Nov 11, 0300z to Nov 11, 0400z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; Member: Name + Member No./”CWA”, non-Member: Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: Nov 13.

CWops Mini-CWT Test, Nov 11, 0700z to Nov 11, 0800z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; Member: Name + Member No./”CWA”, non-Member: Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: Nov 13.

RTTYOPS Weeksprint, Nov 11, 1700z to Nov 11, 1900z; RTTY; Bands: 80, 40, 20; [other station’s call] + [your call] + [serial no.] + [your name]; Logs due: Nov 18.

EACW Meeting, Nov 11, 1900z to Nov 11, 2000z; CW; Bands: 80, 40; EACW Member: RST + Member No. + Nickname, EA non-Member: RST + Nickname + EA province, non-EA: RST + Nickname + DXCC prefix; Logs due: Nov 13.

QRP Fox Hunt, Nov 12, 0100z to Nov 12, 0230z; CW; Bands: 20; RST + (state/province/country) + name + power output; Logs due: Nov 13.

NCCC RTTY Sprint, Nov 12, 0145z to Nov 12, 0215z; RTTY; Bands: (see rules); Serial No. + Name + QTH; Logs due: Nov 14.

NCCC Sprint, Nov 12, 0230z to Nov 12, 0300z; CW; Bands: (see rules); Serial No. + Name + QTH; Logs due: Nov 14.

K1USN Slow Speed Test, Nov 12, 2000z to Nov 12, 2100z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; Maximum 20 wpm, Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: Nov 14.

WAE DX Contest, RTTY, Nov 13, 0000z to Nov 14, 2359z; RTTY; Bands: 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; RS + Serial No.; Logs due: Nov 22.

PODXS 070 Club Triple Play Low Band Sprint, Nov 13, 0000z to Nov 15, 2359z; PSK31; Bands: 160, 80, 40; RST + (state/province/country); Logs due: Nov 22.

10-10 Int. Fall Contest, Digital, Nov 13, 0001z to Nov 14, 2359z; Digital; Bands: 10; 10-10 Member: Name + 10-10 number + (state/province/country), Non-Member: Name + 0 + (state/province/country); Logs due: Nov 22.

JIDX Phone Contest, Nov 13, 0700z to Nov 14, 1300z; SSB; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; JA: RST + Prefecture No., non-JA: RST + CQ Zone No.; Logs due: Dec 15.

SKCC Weekend Sprintathon, Nov 13, 1200z to Nov 14, 2359z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, 6; RST + (state/province/country) + Name + (SKCC No./”NONE”); Logs due: Nov 21.

OK/OM DX Contest, CW, Nov 13, 1200z to Nov 14, 1200z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; OK/OM: RST + 3-letter district code, non-OK/OM: RST + Serial No.; Logs due: Nov 21.

RCA Transatlantic QSO Party, Nov 13, 1200z to Nov 14, 0400z; CW, SSB; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; RCA: RS(T) + “RCA”, non-RCA W/VE: RS(T) + state/province, non-RCA DX: RS(T) + CQ zone; Logs due: Nov 19.

FISTS Saturday Sprint, Nov 13, 1600z to Nov 13, 1800z; CW; Bands: 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; FISTS: RST + (state/province/country) + first name + FISTS No., non-FISTS: RST + (state/province/country) + first name + “0”; Logs due: Nov 27.

CQ-WE Contest, Nov 13, 1900z to Nov 15, 0500z; CW, Phone, Digital; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, 62432 MHz; Name + Location Code (see rules) + Years of Service (see rules); Logs due: Dec 1.

AWA Bruce Kelley 1929 QSO Party, Nov 13, 2300z to Nov 22, 0300z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20; RST + Name + QTH + Eqpt Year + Transmitter Type (see rules for format) + Input Power(W); Logs due: Dec 20.

FIRAC HF Contest, Nov 14, 0700z to Nov 14, 1700z; SSB; Bands: 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; Member: RS(T) + Serial No. + “F”, Non-member: RS(T); Logs due: Nov 28.

Classic Exchange, Phone, Nov 14, 1400z to Nov 17, 0800z; AM, SSB, FM; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, 62; Name + RS + (state/province/country) + rcvr/xmtr manuf/model; Logs due: Dec 31.

K1USN Slow Speed Test, Nov 15, 0000z to Nov 15, 0100z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; Maximum 20 wpm, Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: Nov 17.

4 States QRP Group Second Sunday Sprint, Nov 15, 0100z to Nov 15, 0300z; CW, SSB; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; Member: RS(T) + (State/Province/Country) + Member No., Non-member: RS(T) + (State/Province/Country) + Power; Logs due: Nov 17.

Worldwide Sideband Activity Contest, Nov 16, 0100z to Nov 16, 0159z; SSB; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, 6; RS + age group (OM, YL, Youth YL or Youth); Logs due: Nov 17.

RTTYOPS Weeksprint, Nov 16, 1700z to Nov 16, 1900z; RTTY; Bands: 80, 40, 20; [other station’s call] + [your call] + [serial no.] + [your name]; Logs due: Nov 23.

QRP Fox Hunt, Nov 17, 0200z to Nov 17, 0330z; CW; Bands: 20; RST + (state/province/country) + name + power output; Logs due: Nov 18.

Phone Weekly Test – Fray, Nov 17, 0230z to Nov 17, 0300z; SSB; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15; NA: Name + (state/province/country), non-NA: Name; Logs due: Nov 19.

CWops Mini-CWT Test, Nov 17, 1300z to Nov 17, 1400z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; Member: Name + Member No./”CWA”, non-Member: Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: Nov 20.

CWops Mini-CWT Test, Nov 17, 1900z to Nov 17, 2000z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; Member: Name + Member No./”CWA”, non-Member: Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: Nov 20.

Walk for the Bacon QRP Contest, Nov 18, 0000z to Nov 19, 0300z; CW; Bands: 20; Maximum 13 wpm, RST + (state/province/country) + Name + (Member No./power); Logs due: Nov 25.

NAQCC CW Sprint, Nov 18, 0130z to Nov 18, 0330z; CW; Bands: 80, 40, 20; RST + (state/province/country) + (NAQCC No./power); Logs due: Nov 22.

CWops Mini-CWT Test, Nov 18, 0300z to Nov 18, 0400z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; Member: Name + Member No./”CWA”, non-Member: Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: Nov 20.

CWops Mini-CWT Test, Nov 18, 0700z to Nov 18, 0800z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; Member: Name + Member No./”CWA”, non-Member: Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: Nov 20.

RTTYOPS Weeksprint, Nov 18, 1700z to Nov 18, 1900z; RTTY; Bands: 80, 40, 20; [other station’s call] + [your call] + [serial no.] + [your name]; Logs due: Nov 25.

EACW Meeting, Nov 18, 1900z to Nov 18, 2000z; CW; Bands: 80, 40; EACW Member: RST + Member No. + Nickname, EA non-Member: RST + Nickname + EA province, non-EA: RST + Nickname + DXCC prefix; Logs due: Nov 20.

QRP Fox Hunt, Nov 19, 0100z to Nov 19, 0230z; CW; Bands: 20; RST + (state/province/country) + name + power output; Logs due: Nov 20.

NCCC RTTY Sprint, Nov 19, 0145z to Nov 19, 0215z; RTTY; Bands: (see rules); Serial No. + Name + QTH; Logs due: Nov 21.

NCCC Sprint, Nov 19, 0230z to Nov 19, 0300z; CW; Bands: (see rules); Serial No. + Name + QTH; Logs due: Nov 21.

YO International PSK31 Contest, Nov 19, 1600z to Nov 19, 2200z; PSK31; Bands: 80; YO: RST + Serial No. + County, non-YO: RST + Serial No. + Country; Logs due: Dec 4.

K1USN Slow Speed Test, Nov 19, 2000z to Nov 19, 2100z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; Maximum 20 wpm, Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: Nov 21.

LZ DX Contest, Nov 20, 1200z to Nov 21, 1200z; CW, SSB; Bands: 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; LZ: RS(T) + 2-letter district, non-LZ: RS(T) + ITU Zone No.; Logs due: Dec 6.

All Austrian 160-Meter Contest, Nov 20, 1600z to Nov 20, 2359z; CW; Bands: 160; OE: RST + Serial No. + District Code, non-OE: RST + Serial No.; Logs due: Nov 30.

REF 160-Meter Contest, Nov 20, 1700z to Nov 21, 0100z; CW; Bands: 160; RST + Serial No. + Department Code; Logs due: Nov 29.

Feld Hell Sprint, Nov 20, 1900z to Nov 20, 2059z; Feld Hell; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 15, 10, 6; (see rules); Logs due: Nov 24.

RSGB 1.8 MHz Contest, Nov 20, 1900z to Nov 20, 2300z; CW; Bands: 160; UK: RST + Serial No. + District Code, non-UK: RST + Serial No.; Logs due: Nov 21.

ARRL Sweepstakes Contest, SSB, Nov 20, 2100z to Nov 22, 0300z; SSB; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; Serial No. + Precedence (Q/A/B/U/M/S) + [your call sign] + Check + ARRL/RAC Section; Logs due: Nov 29.

Homebrew and Oldtime Equipment Party, Nov 21, 1300z to Nov 21, 1700z; CW; Bands: 80, 40; RST + Serial No. + “/” + class; Logs due: Dec 27.

FISTS Sunday Sprint, Nov 21, 2100z to Nov 21, 2300z; CW; Bands: 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; FISTS: RST + (state/province/country) + first name + FISTS No., non-FISTS: RST + (state/province/country) + first name + “0”; Logs due: Dec 5.

Run for the Bacon QRP Contest, Nov 21, 2300z to Nov 22, 0100z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; RST + (state/province/country) + (Member No./power); Logs due: Nov 28.

K1USN Slow Speed Test, Nov 22, 0000z to Nov 22, 0100z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; Maximum 20 wpm, Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: Nov 24.

Worldwide Sideband Activity Contest, Nov 23, 0100z to Nov 23, 0159z; SSB; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, 6; RS + age group (OM, YL, Youth YL or Youth); Logs due: Nov 24.

RTTYOPS Weeksprint, Nov 23, 1700z to Nov 23, 1900z; RTTY; Bands: 80, 40, 20; [other station’s call] + [your call] + [serial no.] + [your name]; Logs due: Nov 30.

SKCC Sprint, Nov 24, 0000z to Nov 24, 0200z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, 6; RST + (state/province/country) + Name + (SKCC No./”NONE”); Logs due: Nov 26.

Phone Weekly Test – Fray, Nov 24, 0230z to Nov 24, 0300z; SSB; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15; NA: Name + (state/province/country), non-NA: Name; Logs due: Nov 26.

CWops Mini-CWT Test, Nov 24, 1300z to Nov 24, 1400z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; Member: Name + Member No./”CWA”, non-Member: Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: Nov 27.

CWops Mini-CWT Test, Nov 24, 1900z to Nov 24, 2000z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10; Member: Name + Member No./”CWA”, non-Member: Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: Nov 27.

UKEICC 80m Contest, Nov 24, 2000z to Nov 24, 2100z; CW; Bands: 80; 6-Character grid square; Logs due: Nov 24.

VHF+ CONTESTS

SARL VHF/UHF Analogue Contest, Nov 13, 0500z to Nov 14, 1100z; Analog (CW/SSB/AM/FM); Bands: 50 MHz, 70 MHz, 144 MHz, 432 MHz, 1296 MHz; RS(T) + 6-character grid locator; Logs due: Nov 21.

ARRL EME Contest, Nov 20, 0000z to Nov 21, 2359z; CW, Phone, Digital; Bands: 50 MHz and up; Signal report; Logs due: Jan 19.

See also: SKCC Weekend SprintathonCQ-WE ContestClassic Exchange, PhoneWorldwide Sideband Activity ContestSKCC Sprint

LOG DUE DATES

November 11

November 12

November 13

November 14

November 15

November 16

November 17

November 18

November 19

November 20

November 21

November 22

November 23

November 24

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ARRL Contest Update wishes to acknowledge information from WA7BNM’s Contest CalendarSpaceweather.com, Tim Duffy, K3LR, and Rick Lindquist, WW1ME.

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