The ARRL Contest Update


Here’s the latest Amateur Radio Contest News from HQ ARRL.

Views expressed in this Amateur/Ham Radio News summary are those of the reporters and correspondents.

Accessed on 18 August 2021, 2000 UTC.

Content provided by HQ ARRL, Newington, CT, 06111.

Source:

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The
ARRL Contest Update

August 18, 2021

Editor: Brian Moran, N9ADG

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IN THIS ISSUE
NEW HF OPERATORS — THINGS TO DO

Here we go! “Contest season” is about to take off. It’s a good time to get the outdoor projects wrapped up, and make sure everything is ready. For SSB, try this weekend’s North American QSO Party Phone contest. For digital, the SARTG WW RTTY Contest is a good choice, especially if you get ready for it with Thursday’s NCCC RTTY Sprint practice. If you’re newly licensed, try the ARRL Rookie Roundup, RTTY, on Sunday.

The weekend of August 28, there are a number of QSO parties – HawaiiKansasOhio, and W/VE Islands. In 2021, the Hawaii QSO Party will allow grid squares to be exchanged for those modes that don’t support the “normal” exchange of location, so you can use FT4/FT8, in addition to SSB and CW. For an exclusively FT4/FT8 contest, try the World-Wide Digi DX Contest (hint: FT4 completes contacts more quickly, however there’s usually more activity on FT8, which is a pity during a contest).

BUSTED QSOS

Jim, KE0NRE, wrote asking about the weight of the Burst 2000A amplifier mentioned in the last Contest Update: “I’m confused. Does it weigh 14 pounds or 15 kg?” Well, Jim, I was the confused one, as the amplifier weight is mentioned on the manufacturer’s website as 17 kg!

Dave, K3ZJ, also noted the discrepancy, and also noted: “I would suggest that the SPE 1.5K is lighter at 21 pounds (9.5 kg) with full U.S. legal power output. The JUMA1000 also is a good one, with a known and reliable history and support. (With) 1000 watts, it weighs 12.5 lbs. (5.5 kg).”

CONTEST SUMMARY

Complete information for all contests follows the Conversation section

19 Aug – 1 Sep 2021

August 19

August 20

August 21

August 22

August 23

August 24

August 25

August 26

August 27

August 28

August 29

August 30

August 31

September 1

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NEWS, PRESS RELEASES, AND GENERAL INTEREST

Following Earthquake in Haiti, Radio Amateurs Asked to Keep Frequencies Clear. Net-net: Please keep these frequencies clear in IARU Region 2: 3750 kHz, 7150 kHz and 14330 kHz.

The Ohio QSO Party is on August 28, from noon to midnight ET. Please note that some sources may have provided a different date, however August 28 is the date for 2021, confirmed by Jim, K8MR, the OhQP Chairman. (Jim, K8MR)

The Kansas QSO Party during the August 28 weekend has added a Rover category for 2021. Work special 1×1 stations to spell KANSAS, QSOPARTY, SUNFLOWER, and YELLOWBRICKROAD to earn antique US postage stamps with radio/electronic themes. Collect all nine of the original stamps, and you can earn a KSQP T-shirt. There are even special awards for the highest scoring Ohio and Hawaii log entries. As always, see the rules for details.

When hunting down a pesky RFI noise source, remember that gear does not have to be on to generate RF noise. The switching power supplies that are part of today’s electronics often continue to operate even when the device appears to be off. The only way to be reasonably sure a line-operated device’s switching power supply is not operating is to unplug the device from the wall.

Like ripples in a three-dimension space-pond, radio signals emanating from Earth since the inception of wireless broadcasting could have reached 75 other star systems, according to Discover Magazine. There are that many star systems within 100 light years of Earth. It’s unclear whether aliens would be listening for signals using AM. Perhaps they switched to FT8 years ago.

Frank Maynard, NF8M, recommended an article on Guitar Magazine’s website about how the global shortage of chips and other resources is affecting the supply of electronic tube equipment. Frank comments: “Not news to most hams who have been buying new-old-stock tubes for years. Fortunately, most of us are good at hoarding these things!”

Cycle 25 could be big, and early! According to Spaceweather.com, “Solar Cycle 25 is heating up faster than expected.

The ARRL has a web page that will calculate RF exposure, per the new FCC rules. “Under the new FCC rules, some amateurs need to perform routine station evaluations to ensure that their stations comply with the RF exposure rules. This can be as simple as running an online calculator to determine the minimum safe distance between any part of your antenna and areas where people might be exposed to RF energy from your station. Although amateurs can make measurements of their stations, evaluations can also be done by calculation.”

Peter, DF1LX, has written a tool for N1MM Logger+ called n1mm_toolboxIt’s a 64-bit Microsoft Windows application that provides the following functionality:

  • Warns when operating outside of designated “contest-preferred segments” for IARU Region 1
  • “Call Sign Alert” – a file of call signs can be provided; if a spot is received with that call sign, it will be displayed in a small window, and that spot can be tune in the logger
  • Time On/Off display in a window
  • Countdown timer to contest start
  • Record and play audio files

According to Joe Taylor, K1JT: “WSJT-X 2.5.0-rc4 has a bug that prevents normal use of messages that include compound or nonstandard call signs. For this reason we are making a public Release Candidate WSJT-X 2.5.0-rc5 after an unusually short interval. The RC5 release candidate is now ready for download by beta testers. On Windows the installation package also includes MAP65 3.0.0-rc5.”

QRP Labs’ August 2021 Newsletter is available on their website. New products include the QCX-Mini, a refinement of their very popular QCX transceiver (over 15,000 shipped!), as well as upcoming new designs for their balloon transmitter.

Gary, ZL2IFB, suggested a follow-up to the last issue’s operating tip of knowing when to change frequencies:

“It’s worth taking a look at the DX Cluster before moving. In particular, if you are spotted, hold out for a few minutes longer to mop up anyone chasing your spot. The Info window in N1MM Logger+ prominently displays any DX spots for your call sign, including comments that can be worthwhile too (for example: skimmer reports and notes such as “long path,” “only sig on band,” or “raspy auroral”).

Another thing to do before moving is check your contest notes. Did you plan to be on a specific band around this time for a short opening?

As to where to move next, the choices include:

Search and pounce or perhaps look for a better CQ frequency, on the same band. You might just find another multiplier or bonus as the band dies and propagation swings away – for example Western Europeans and those North Atlantic islands may still be workable after the central and Eastern Europeans have dropped out.

Check the number of spotted QSOs and multipliers available on other bands for clues about where the points are. Normally we QSY one band LF or HF, but it may be worth moving two bands, especially towards the last third of the contest and around grayline when it is worth the investment of time and effort to chase multipliers.

QSY to bed or take a comfort and coffee break to get your energy levels up for the next session. If you’re tired and flagging, now might be a good time to hand over to a keen fresh op with a new strategy and bags of enthusiasm.

WORD TO THE WISE

Meteor Scatter

propagation mode that takes advantage of the ionization trails left by extraterrestrial debris burning up after entering the Earth’s atmosphere. Every day, meteor scatter opportunities exist for contacts on 10 meters, 6 meters, and 2 meters at distances between 500 to 2300 kilometers, especially during the morning hours. During meteor showers, there may be hundreds of “pings” per hour. WSJT-X‘s MSK144 mode is typically used for meteor scatter communications, though the newer shorter-duration Q65-12A mode may see increasing use. To get started, try Parker Radio Association’s Simple Guide to Meteor Scatter / MSK144.

SIGHTS AND SOUNDS

Bob, N6TV, posted to the Reverse Beacon Network email reflector: “In June the Spokane DX Association invited me to give a talk about the Reverse Beacon Network. It’s the same talk I gave at Dayton Contest University a few times, so many of you may have already seen it. But at the end there was a live demo of the RBN beta website and the DJ1YFK site, which may be new to some of you. Here’s the Standard RBN Presentation, and the Demo video.” Mel, N7GCO, coordinates the varied presentations for the Spokane DX Association.

Mike, W7VO, was the chair of the Contest Forum at the Willamette Valley DX Club’s virtual Pacific Northwest DX Convention. Other panelists included Bill, AC0W, Bart, W9JJ, and Jim, KI7Y. The first topic discussed was the ARRL Contest Advisory Committee’s recent activity. If you’d like to understand the reasoning and impetus for changes to future ARRL Contests, this is a must watch.

EA3GRN tests an inexpensive balun kit from China in his YouTube video. Though it’s in Spanish, it’s possible for non-Spanish speakers (like me) to get the gist by turning on the translated closed captioning feature in YouTube.

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RESULTS AND RECORDS

The results of the 2021 Georgia QSO Party results have been published according to Jeff, KU8E, Georgia QSO Party Director. The 2022 Georgia QSO Party will take place on April 9-10, 2022, the second full weekend in April.

OPERATING TIP

Have A Contest Operating Plan

Be a “conscious contester” for bigger scores. If you’re in it to do the best you can, make a plan for the times that you operate during the contest period. Make your plan in 30 minute or 1-hour intervals, taking into account past instances of this contest, the current sun spot cycle, and other factors such as past 3830scores.com reports (e.g. “took advantage of a late night opening to Asia on 20 meters”) to help you decide what bands to be on, where to point your beam, and where to look for needed multipliers. Plan to gather more information during the contest to help you make decisions. Think of it this way: If you had to write down instructions for someone that was operating your station on how to operate in the contest, those directions would be the plan. Write the plan down. Consult it during the contest. Take notes as necessary to modify it for the next time. Plan to have fun.

TECHNICAL TOPICS AND INFORMATION

These look like a lot of fun: “Circuit Pattern Trading Cards” – Like flash cards for various types of popular circuits. From the description: “brush up on techniques and discover time-tested patterns…Each card has a schematic and short description of a common circuit pattern in electronics. Topics covered include digital, analog, and power electronics. There are 32 cards in total, all unique.”

Here’s a project on Hackaday.IO: an emulation of an analog panel meter using an LED Display and modest CPU. The key part is that the “needle” drawing “moves like an analog needle with mass and spring oscillations.” Could be just the thing to add some style to your next project that has a display, and data that could be displayed this way.

Radiosonde launches can be observed and decoded using RTL-SDR hardware, and the radiosonde_auto_rx repository by projectthorus. Radiosonde data is used in weather forecasting, and shared among nations by international agreement.

If your Microsoft Windows 10-based computer’s drive failed and needed replacement, could you restore the OS quickly from your backups to the new drive? This article shows how to use the Windows media creation tool to make an ISO file that can be “burned” to a DVD, or put onto a USB stick, to restore your legally licensed Windows 10 to your machine.

Gpsd is a system program found in many Linux distributions, in some phones, and as a component in some software packages. A bug has been identified that may cause an inadvertent jump in time for some version of gpsd in October, 2021, due to the way that leap seconds are handled. In this case, the issue arises because an anticipated leap-second did not occur. Here’s the discussion about the issue; since gpsd is open source, derivative works of gpsd could contain this issue as well.

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CONVERSATION

Multi-Operator Techniques for the Single Operator

Multi-One and Multi-Two Contesting” by Craig, K9CT, and originally featured in November/December 2019 NCJ isn’t just for multi-one and multi-two contesters! Much of the article’s advice and insights can be used by operators in any category, and especially those operators that are contemplating trying single-operator, two radio (SO2R) operating. I heartily encourage you to read the article in its entirety.

Every operator can benefit from knowing their contest goals: “Are you out to win it all, to win your area, zone, section or state? Do you want to set a personal best? Do you want to set a record? Who are your competitors and can you beat them?” The need to “assess your goals… and then build a station capable of achieving them” is valid for any operator. The same for needing to know how to win: “You must know the rules, have high ethics, and be capable of high rates and maximizing multipliers. It is extremely important that you know the propagation for your location, that (you) have the needed experience… and that you design your station to be as automated as possible with the best affordable technology.”

Successful station building is a universal need. Craig suggests being methodical about how to do it, starting with the big-ticket items, “Give some thought to the size of the property, arrangement of towers and antennas, feed line losses, and filters. Do a careful analysis, band by band” but eventually getting to the smallest of details that can make or break a station, such as operator comfort and station layout. Will all of the details combine, and then just fade into the background, as the operator is allowed to focus on the logging screen?

Equipment selection is critical for multi-operator stations, where inter-operating-position interference will reduce scores. There’s no reason to not take advantage of Craig’s advice to choose radios that have “…low transmitted noise, produce a clean signal, and have a great CW waveform” — he suggests to carefully read the Product Review articles in QST.

In low-rate hours, Craig suggests that searching and pouncing may be more effective than trying to run, especially when multiple operating positions can do this simultaneously with a lockout. For single operators, learning how to tune a second VFO for new stations between calling CQ on the run frequency is more work than just calling CQ, but adds points. Practice makes it less difficult.

And finally, Craig also mentions that for those that are not able to create their own station, it’s entirely possible to use a service such as Remote Ham Radio or BeLoud.US to operate remotely using a station in a good or great location, with top-tier equipment. It was easy and effective in 2019 when the article was originally published, and with two more years of improvements in technology, in 2021 the remote experience is even better.

That’s all for this time. Remember to send contesting related stories, book reviews, tips, techniques, press releases, errata, schematics, club information, pictures, stories, blog links, and predictions to contest-update@arrl.org

73, Brian N9ADG

CONTESTS

19 Aug – 1 Sep 2021

An expanded, downloadable version of QST’Contest Corral is available as a PDF. Check the sponsors’ website for information on operating time restrictions and other instructions.

HF CONTESTS

CWops Mini-CWT Test, Aug 19, 0300z to Aug 19, 0400z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; Member: Name + Member No./”CWA”, non-Member: Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: August 21.

CWops Mini-CWT Test, Aug 19, 0700z to Aug 19, 0800z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; Member: Name + Member No./”CWA”, non-Member: Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: August 21.

RTTYOPS Weeksprint, Aug 19, 1700z to Aug 19, 1900z; RTTY; Bands: 80, 40, 20m; [other station’s call] + [your call] + [serial no.] + [your name]; Logs due: August 24.

EACW Meeting, Aug 19, 1900z to Aug 19, 2000z; CW; Bands: 80, 40m; EACW Member: RST + Member No. + Nickname, EA non-Member: RST + Nickname + EA province, non-EA: RST + Nickname + DXCC prefix; Logs due: August 21.

QRP Fox Hunt, Aug 20, 0100z to Aug 20, 0230z; CW; Bands: 20m Only; RST + (state/province/country) + name + power output; Logs due: August 21.

NCCC RTTY Sprint, Aug 20, 0145z to Aug 20, 0215z; RTTY; Bands: (see rules); Serial No. + Name + QTH; Logs due: August 22.

NCCC Sprint Ladder, Aug 20, 0230z to Aug 20, 0300z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15m; Serial No. + Name + QTH; Logs due: August 22.

K1USN Slow Speed Test, Aug 20, 2000z to Aug 20, 2100z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; Maximum 20 wpm, Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: August 22.

SARTG WW RTTY Contest, Aug 21, 0000z to Aug 21, 0800z and, Aug 21, 1600z to Aug 22, 0000z and, Aug 22, 0800z to Aug 22, 1600z; RTTY; Bands: 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; RST + Serial No.; Logs due: September 12.

Russian District Award Contest, Aug 21, 0800z to Aug 22, 0800z; CW, SSB; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; RU: RS(T) + District code, non-RU: RS(T) + QSO No.; Logs due: September 6.

Keyman’s Club of Japan Contest, Aug 21, 1200z to Aug 22, 1200z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, 6m; JA: RST + prefecture/district code, non-JA: RST + CQ zone; Logs due: September 11.

Feld Hell Sprint, Aug 21, 1600z to Aug 21, 1759z; Feld Hell; Bands: (see rules); (see rules); Logs due: August 24.

North American QSO Party, SSB, Aug 21, 1800z to Aug 22, 0559z; SSB; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; NA: Name + (state/DC/province/country), non-NA: Name; Logs due: August 29.

CVA DX Contest, CW, Aug 21, 2100z to Aug 22, 2100z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; RST + type/UF(see rules); Logs due: September 15.

ARRL Rookie Roundup, RTTY, Aug 22, 1800z to Aug 22, 2359z; RTTY; Bands: 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; NA: Name + 2-digit year first licensed + (state/province/XE area/DX); Logs due: August 25.

K1USN Slow Speed Test, Aug 23, 0000z to Aug 23, 0100z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; Maximum 20 wpm, Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: August 29.

Worldwide Sideband Activity Contest, Aug 24, 0100z to Aug 24, 0159z; SSB; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, 6m; RS + age group (OM, YL, Youth YL or Youth); Logs due: August 25.

RTTYOPS Weeksprint, Aug 24, 1700z to Aug 24, 1900z; RTTY; Bands: 80, 40, 20m; [other station’s call] + [your call] + [serial no.] + [your name]; Logs due: August 24.

SKCC Sprint, Aug 25, 0000z to Aug 25, 0200z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, 6m; RST + (state/province/country) + Name + (SKCC No./”NONE”); Logs due: August 27.

Phone Weekly Test – Fray, Aug 25, 0230z to Aug 25, 0300z; SSB; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15m; NA: Name + (state/province/country), non-NA: Name; Logs due: August 27.

CWops Mini-CWT Test, Aug 25, 1300z to Aug 25, 1400z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; Member: Name + Member No./”CWA”, non-Member: Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: August 28.

CWops Mini-CWT Test, Aug 25, 1900z to Aug 25, 2000z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; Member: Name + Member No./”CWA”, non-Member: Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: August 28.

CWops Mini-CWT Test, Aug 26, 0300z to Aug 26, 0400z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; Member: Name + Member No./”CWA”, non-Member: Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: August 28.

CWops Mini-CWT Test, Aug 26, 0700z to Aug 26, 0800z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; Member: Name + Member No./”CWA”, non-Member: Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: August 28.

RTTYOPS Weeksprint, Aug 26, 1700z to Aug 26, 1900z; RTTY; Bands: 80, 40, 20m; [other station’s call] + [your call] + [serial no.] + [your name]; Logs due: August 31.

EACW Meeting, Aug 26, 1900z to Aug 26, 2000z; CW; Bands: 80, 40m; EACW Member: RST + Member No. + Nickname, EA non-Member: RST + Nickname + EA province, non-EA: RST + Nickname + DXCC prefix; Logs due: August 28.

QRP Fox Hunt, Aug 27, 0100z to Aug 27, 0230z; CW; Bands: 20m Only; RST + (state/province/country) + name + power output; Logs due: August 28.

NCCC RTTY Sprint, Aug 27, 0145z to Aug 27, 0215z; RTTY; Bands: (see rules); Serial No. + Name + QTH; Logs due: August 29.

NCCC Sprint Ladder, Aug 27, 0230z to Aug 27, 0300z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15m; Serial No. + Name + QTH; Logs due: August 29.

K1USN Slow Speed Test, Aug 27, 2000z to Aug 27, 2100z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; Maximum 20 wpm, Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: August 29.

Hawaii QSO Party, Aug 28, 0400z to Aug 30, 0400z; CW, Phone, Digital; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; HI: RS(T) + QTH, non-HI W/VE: RS(T) + (state/province), DX: RS(T); Logs due: September 13.

ALARA Contest, Aug 28, 0600z to Aug 29, 0559z; CW, Phone; Bands: 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; ALARA: RS(T) + Name, non-ALARA: RS(T) + Serial No. + Name + (whether YL/OM/club station); Logs due: September 30.

YO DX HF Contest, Aug 28, 1200z to Aug 29, 1200z; CW, SSB; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; YO: RS(T) + county, non-YO: RS(T) + Serial No.; Logs due: September 5.

World Wide Digi DX Contest, Aug 28, 1200z to Aug 29, 1200z; FT4/8; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; 4-character grid square; Logs due: September 3.

W/VE Islands QSO Party, Aug 28, 1200z to Aug 29, 0300z; CW, Phone, Digital; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, 6m; Islands: RS(T) + USI/CISA Island Designation (see rules for digital), Non-Islands: RS(T) + (state/province/country)(see rules for digital); Logs due: September 30.

Kansas QSO Party, Aug 28, 1400z to Aug 29, 0200z and, Aug 29, 1400z to Aug 29, 2000z; CW, SSB, Digital; Bands: 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, 6m; KS: RS(T) + county, non-KS: RS(T) + (state/province/”DX”); Logs due: October 1.

Ohio QSO Party, Aug 28, 1600z to Aug 29, 0400z; CW, SSB; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; OH: RS(T) + county, non-OH: RS(T) + (state/province/”DX”); Logs due: September 27.

CVA DX Contest, SSB, Aug 28, 2100z to Aug 29, 2100z; SSB; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; RS + type/UF(see rules); Logs due: September 15.

SARL HF CW Contest, Aug 29, 1400z to Aug 29, 1700z; CW; Bands: 80, 40, 20m; RST + Serial No.; Logs due: September 3.

K1USN Slow Speed Test, Aug 30, 0000z to Aug 30, 0100z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; Maximum 20 wpm, Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: September 5.

QCX Challenge, Aug 30, 1300z to Aug 30, 1400z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; RST + Name + (state/province/country) + Rig; Logs due: September 5.

QCX Challenge, Aug 30, 1900z to Aug 30, 2000z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; RST + Name + (state/province/country) + Rig; Logs due: September 5.

Worldwide Sideband Activity Contest, Aug 31, 0100z to Aug 31, 0159z; SSB; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, 6m; RS + age group (OM, YL, Youth YL or Youth); Logs due: September 1.

QCX Challenge, Aug 31, 0300z to Aug 31, 0400z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; RST + Name + (state/province/country) + Rig; Logs due: September 5.

RTTYOPS Weeksprint, Aug 31, 1700z to Aug 31, 1900z; RTTY; Bands: 80, 40, 20m; [other station’s call] + [your call] + [serial no.] + [your name]; Logs due: August 31.

Phone Weekly Test – Fray, Sep 1, 0230z to Sep 1, 0300z; SSB; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15m; NA: Name + (state/province/country), non-NA: Name; Logs due: August 20.

CWops Mini-CWT Test, Sep 1, 1300z to Sep 1, 1400z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; Member: Name + Member No./”CWA”, non-Member: Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: August 21.

VHF-UHF FT8 Activity Contest, Sep 1, 1700z to Sep 1, 2000z; FT8; Bands: (see rules); 4-character grid square; Logs due: September 6.

CWops Mini-CWT Test, Sep 1, 1900z to Sep 1, 2000z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; Member: Name + Member No./”CWA”, non-Member: Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: August 21.

UKEICC 80m Contest, Sep 1, 2000z to Sep 1, 2100z; ; Bands: 80m Only; 6-Character grid square; Logs due: September 1.

G3ZQS Memorial Straight Key Contest, Sep 1, 2300z to Sep 3, 2300z; CW; Bands: 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; FISTS: RST + (state/province/country) + name + FISTS No., non-FISTS: RST + (state/province/country) + name + power; Logs due: October 3.

VHF+ CONTESTS

ARRL 10 GHz and Up Contest, Aug 21, 0600 (local) to Aug 23, 0000 (local); Any; Bands: 10 GHz to light; 6-Character Maidenhead Locator; Logs due: October 19.

Also, see Keyman’s Club of Japan ContestWorldwide Sideband Activity ContestSKCC SprintW/VE Islands QSO PartyKansas QSO Party,

LOG DUE DATES

19 Aug – 1 Sep 2021

August 19, 2021

August 20, 2021

August 21, 2021

August 22, 2021

August 23, 2021

August 24, 2021

August 25, 2021

August 26, 2021

August 28, 2021

August 29, 2021

August 31, 2021

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ARRL Contest Update wishes to acknowledge information from WA7BNM’s Contest Calendar.


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Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russell Roberts (KH6JRM)

Public Information Officer

Hawaii County, ARRL Pacific Section

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Retired News director of Pacific Radio Group Radio Stations on Hawaii-the Big Island. I have more than 40 years of broadcast experience, including positons at KTUH-FM (UH-Manoa), KPOI-FM (Honolulu). KHLO-AM (Hilo), KKBG-FM (KBIG-FM)(Hilo/Kona), KAPA-FM (Hilo-Kona). Native-FM (Hilo-Kona), and ESPN Hawaii (Hilo-Kona). Former University of Hawaii-Hilo librarian. Retired Air Force Officer. Amateur (Ham) Radio operator since 1977 (currently holds the Amateur Extra Class License from the FCC-KH6JRM).... Can read, write, and speak Russian. Retired on 30 September 2011, but still maintains a Hawaii Island News Blog.

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Posted in Amateur/Ham Radio, ARRL, Big Island ARRL News, Big Island of Hawaii ARRL info, Club Activities, Contests
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Russ Roberts

Russ Roberts

Retired News director of Pacific Radio Group Radio Stations on Hawaii-the Big Island. I have more than 40 years of broadcast experience, including positons at KTUH-FM (UH-Manoa), KPOI-FM (Honolulu). KHLO-AM (Hilo), KKBG-FM (KBIG-FM)(Hilo/Kona), KAPA-FM (Hilo-Kona). Native-FM (Hilo-Kona), and ESPN Hawaii (Hilo-Kona). Former University of Hawaii-Hilo librarian. Retired Air Force Officer. Amateur (Ham) Radio operator since 1977 (currently holds the Amateur Extra Class License from the FCC-KH6JRM).... Can read, write, and speak Russian. Retired on 30 September 2011, but still maintains a Hawaii Island News Blog.

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  • Open-Source Amateur Satellite Work Not Subject to Export Administration Regulation September 23, 2021
    CEO Michelle Thompson, W5NYV, reports that Open Research Institute (ORI) received an advisory opinion from the US Commerce Department Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) on September 2. The letter confirmed that public internet posts regarding open-source amateur satellite communications work are not subject to Export Administration Regulation (EAR). ORI w […]
  • ARRL, RSGB Announce Joint Events to Celebrate Centenary of Ham Radio Transatlantic Success September 23, 2021
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