ARRL-FCC sign new memo on volunteer monitors; ham astronaut remembered


Welcome to an “Amateur/Ham Radio News’ update from Big Island ARRL News.

Views expressed in this Amateur/Ham Radio news summary are those of the reporters and correspondents.\

Content provided by HQ ARRL, 225 Main Street, Newington, CT, 06111.

Accessed on 18 April 2019, 0445 UTC, Post 940.

Source (via email):

https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/?tab=rm#label/ARRL+website/FMfcgxwCgLlfJnTtkppTlMXBCNXlQmXt

Please click link or scroll down to read the latest ARRL and FCC memorandum.

ARRL Web site

6:43 AM (11 hours ago)

 to me
SB QST @ ARL $ARLB014
ARLB014 ARRL and FCC Sign Memorandum to Implement New Volunteer
Monitor ProgramZCZC AG14
QST de W1AW
ARRL Bulletin 14  ARLB014
From ARRL Headquarters
Newington CT  April 17, 2019
To all radio amateurs

SB QST ARL ARLB014
ARLB014 ARRL and FCC Sign Memorandum to Implement New Volunteer
Monitor Program

ARRL and the FCC have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU)
that paves the way to implement the new and enhanced Volunteer
Monitor program. The memorandum establishes the Volunteer Monitors
as a replacement for the Official Observers (OO) program. Current
OOs have been encouraged to participate in the new program.

“We are excited by the opportunity to codify our partnership with
the FCC and to work together to achieve our mutual interests of
protecting the integrity of our Amateur Radio bands,” said ARRL
President Rick Roderick, K5UR. “This Memorandum of Understanding
will serve as the foundation for a new level of partnership on this
very important issue.”

ARRL has contracted with retired FCC special counsel and former
Atlantic Division Vice Director Riley Hollingsworth, K4ZDH, to
oversee the ARRL’s role in the development and implementation of the
Volunteer Monitor program.

Approved by the ARRL Board of Directors at its July 2018 meeting,
the new Volunteer Monitor program is a formal agreement between the
FCC and ARRL in which volunteers trained and vetted by the ARRL will
monitor the airwaves and collect evidence that can be used both to
correct misconduct or recognize exemplary on-air operation. Cases of
flagrant violations will be referred to the FCC by the ARRL for
action in accordance with FCC guidelines.

The intent of this program is to re-energize enforcement efforts in
the Amateur Radio bands. It was proposed by the FCC in the wake of
several FCC regional office closures and a reduction in field staff.

“Under this program, the FCC will give enforcement priority to cases
developed by the Volunteer Monitor program, without the delay of
ARRL having to refer cases through the FCC online complaint
process,” Hollingsworth said.

Hollingsworth has identified three phases to the program:
Development, Solicitation and Training, and Implementation.

* The Development phase will include drafting a mission statement,
clearly defining the ARRL’s and FCC’s requirements and needs as part
of the program, writing a job description for volunteer monitors,
and developing a training manual for volunteers.

* The Solicitation and Training phase will involve identifying the
geographic locations where volunteer monitors will be most needed,
soliciting applications and guidance from Section Managers in
reviewing applicants. (Those currently volunteering as Official
Observers are invited to apply for appointment as Volunteer
Monitors.)

* The Implementation phase will involve having the volunteers
provide field reports to ARRL, with staff offering guidance to
volunteers to ensure that the information collected meets
requirements for FCC enforcement action.

Hollingsworth has committed to FCC and ARRL officials to ensure the
adequacy of training for the new positions, to review the quality
and utility of Volunteer Monitor submissions to the FCC for
enforcement actions, and to advocate for rapid disposition of cases
appropriately submitted to the FCC.

ARRL officials estimate that within 6 to 9 months the first
Volunteer Monitors will be in place and ready to begin their duties.
NNNN
/EX

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Amateur Radio Space Pioneer Owen Garriott (W5LFL) SK.

Source (via email):

https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/?tab=rm#label/ARRL+website/FMfcgxwCgLlfJpcXnFSqMNlKxsJjkLCS

Please click link or scroll down to read the full article.

ARRL Web site

6:55 AM (11 hours ago)

 to me
SB SPCL @ ARL $ARLX004
ARLX004 Amateur Radio in Space Pioneer Astronaut Owen Garriott,
W5LFL (SK)ZCZC AX04
QST de W1AW
Special Bulletin 4  ARLX004
From ARRL Headquarters
Newington CT  April 17, 2019
To all radio amateurs

SB SPCL ARL ARLX004
ARLX004 Amateur Radio in Space Pioneer Astronaut Owen Garriott,
W5LFL (SK)

The US astronaut who pioneered the use of Amateur Radio to make
contacts from space – Owen K. Garriott, W5LFL – died April 15 at his
home in Huntsville, Alabama. He was 88. Garriott’s ham radio
activity ushered in the formal establishment of Amateur Radio in
space, first as SAREX – the Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment, and
later as ARISS – Amateur Radio on the International Space Station.

“Owen Garriott was a good friend and an incredible astronaut,”
fellow astronaut Buzz Aldrin tweeted. “I have a great sadness as I
learn of his passing today. Godspeed Owen.”

An Oklahoma native, Garriott – an electrical engineer – spent 2
months aboard the Skylab space station in 1973 and 10 days aboard
Spacelab-1 during a 1983 Space Shuttle Columbia mission. It was
during the latter mission that Garriott thrilled radio amateurs
around the world by making the first contacts from space. Thousands
of hams listened on 2-meter FM, hoping to hear him or to make a
contact. Garriott ended up working stations around the globe, among
them such notables as the late King Hussein, JY1, of Jordan, and the
late US Senator Barry Goldwater, K7UGA. He also made the first CW
contact from space. Garriott called hamming from space “a pleasant
pastime.”

“I managed to do it in my off-duty hours, and it was a pleasure to
get involved in it and to talk with people who are as interested in
space as the 100,000 hams on the ground seemed to be,” he said in an
interview published in the February 1984 edition of QST. “So, it was
just a pleasant experience, the hamming in particular, all the way
around.”

Although Garriott had planned to operate on ham radio during his 10
days in space, no special provisions were made on board the
spacecraft in terms of equipment – unlike the situation today on the
International Space Station. Garriott simply used a hand-held
transceiver with its antenna in the window of Spacelab-1. His first
pass was down the US West Coast.

“[A]s I approached the US, I began to hear stations that were trying
to reach me,” he told QST. “On my very first CQ, there were plenty
of stations responding.” His first contact was with Lance Collister,
WA1JXN, in Montana.

ARISS ARRL Representative Rosalie White, K1STO, met Garriott when he
attended Hamvention, “both times, sitting next to him at Hamvention
dinner banquets,” she recounted. “Once when he was a Special
Achievement Award winner, and once with him and [his son] Richard
when Richard won the 2009 Special Achievement Award. Owen was
unassuming, very smart, kind, and up to date on the latest
technology.” Garriott shared a Hamvention Special Achievement Award
in 2002 with fellow Amateur Radio astronaut Tony England, W0ORE.

Richard Garriott, W5KWQ, was a private space traveler to the ISS,
flown there by the Russian Federal Space Agency, and he also carried
ham radio into space.
NNNN
/EX

————————

Hawaii Amateur/Ham Radio News:

I just received this note from Barbara (NH7FY) regarding luncheon meetings

for the Big Island Amateur Radio Club:

“At the BIARC meeting on Saturday, the subject of he BIARC Friday lunches

was voted on.  It was decided to continue the lunches.  We have been meeting

at 11:30 AM on Fridays at the Ponds Restaurant in Hilo.  We sure would like to

have more than the 4-5 hams attending each week.  Please call Barbara at

935-3377 if you plan to attend so that the reservations can be made.”

Barbara also notes that “My daily contact with Micronesia has had a change.

The over the horizon radar has been complicating our transmissions, so we

moved to 14.280 and currently at 7 PM local Hawaiian time.”


All Hawaii Island radio amateurs/hams are encouraged to sign up for the new

ARRL EMCOMM Course (EC-001).  Pacific Section Emergency  Coordinator

(SEC) Clem Jung (KH7HO) will handle student registration for the EC-001 course.

To register, please send an email to Clem at kh7ho@arrl.net.


Doug Wilson (KH7DQ is continuing his free Technician License Classes on

Hawaii Island.  Here’s the updated schedule:  19 April 2019, 1830 UTC, at

Discovery Harbor in Ka’u;  23 May 2019 in Waimea (location TBA); and 17

October 2019 at the Keaau Community Center in Keaau, Hawaii Island.


For the latest Amateur/Ham Radio news and information, please check the blog

sidebars and links.  These news feeds are updated daily and weekly. Thanks for

joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russell Roberts (KH6JRM)

Public Information Coordinator

Hawaii County, ARRL Pacific Section

https://bigislandarrlnews. com