The ARRL Contest Update for September 18, 2019


Welcome to “The ARRL Contest Update” from Big Island ARRL News.

Views expressed in this Amateur/Ham Radio News summary are those of the reporters and correspondents.

Content provided by HQ ARRL, 225 Main Street, Newington, CT, 06111.

Editor:  Brian Moran (N9ADG),

Accessed on 19 September 2019, 1455 UTC, Post 1123.

Source:

http://www.arrl.org/contest-update-issues?issue=2019-09-18

Please click link or scroll down to read your selections.

IN THIS ISSUE
NEW HF OPERATORS — THINGS TO DO

Here it comes – fall contest season! The chill in the air, the reappearance of our stealthy wire antennas as the leaves fall. Fall signals the beginning of weekend hours spent in front of the radio. This coming weekend you can warm up with a few QSO parties, including the Collegiate QSO Party sponsored by W4DFU at the University of Florida, the Washington State Salmon Run, and New Hampshire, Iowa, and New Jersey QSO Parties. There are varying hours and exchanges, so check the rules. If the ether favors, maybe we’ll hear some watery CW signals coming over the pole for the Scandinavian Activity Contest. These days any contact via the polar path is to be treasured. The weekend of September 23 things get serious with the CQ World Wide DX RTTY Contest. As I’ve written before, if you can operate FT8 or FT4, you’re already equipped to run RTTY in AFSK mode. You just need to install and configure some software. Easy, right?

BUSTED QSOS

Ward, N0AX, writes: “Appreciated the note about the online log in the last issue. Actually, the first online logging service that I am aware of is In The Log (http://inthelog.com/). It was developed several years ago (2010) by K5TR and N5KO in support of the initial Rookie Roundup contests when the planned real-time logging service development did not happen as planned. I have used it from time to time but I think it is largely inactive today although it is still running and available. Those two guys have produced a lot of quality software in support of the contest community.”

CONTEST SUMMARY

Complete information for all contests follows the Conversation section

19 Sep – 2 Oct 2019

September 19

September 20

September 21

September 22

September 23

September 24

September 25

September 26

September 27

September 28

September 30

October 1

October 2

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NEWS, PRESS RELEASES, AND GENERAL INTEREST

The W4DXCC DX and Contest Convention will be held September 20 and 21 in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee. The main program has something for nearly everyone, including a session by Bill, N4IQ, entitled “So you want to be a Contester…But do Not have a Beam?” Friday’s events include a Ham Radio Bootcamp.

The 25th annual Pacific Northwest VHF Conference will be held October 11-12 in Issaquah, Washington. More information on the conference is available on the conference website.

Contest University USA 2020 will be held in Dayton Crowne Plaza Hotel on Thursday, May 14, 2020. Hotel registration for the event opened just a few days ago on September 16, 2019. According to Tim, K3LR: “After the 2019 Crowne Plaza experience I conducted a thorough review of all available facilities in the Dayton/Xenia area including several site visits. I also met with key stakeholders and they assure me that the security issues with the Crowne have been dealt with. Local authorities have given assurances that there will be improvements during our stay for 2020. The adjoining parking garage work will be completed in time for our arrival. Therefore contester activities will stay at the Crowne for 2020.” Make sure you use the group code “CON” when making your reservation.

The 2020 Dayton Hamvention week dates are:

According to posts by Tsutsumi Takehiko, JA5AEA, to the WSJT-X Development email list, the regulatory agency in Japan responsible for frequency allocations is considering changes to bring Japan’s 160 meter band plan allocation for FTx modes to be more compatible to those used in the rest of the world. At the same time, allocations for those modes in the 80 meter and 40 meter bands may also be reconsidered.

Dink, N7WA, writes:

It’s here, the Salmon Run. Sponsored by the Western Washington DX Club, it’s the only place you can win smoked salmon for getting on the air. We also have beautiful certificates, plaques, and this year, something new – a commemorative beer glass to a few deserving ops.

It all happens September 21 and 22. (See the rules for specific times.)

On the WWDXC web site you’ll find the…rules, county activation list (including county expeditions and mobiles), and Washington State county abbreviation list. If you paper log, please take the time to use WA7BNM’s WA State Salmon Run Cabrillo generator.
If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to ask via email.
cheers
mike, n7wa

Bill Clark, K6WSC, Chairman of the Arizona QSO Party, writes: “The 11th running of the Arizona QSO Party is October 12 & 13, 2019. A record number of logs were received for this event last year. Category winners in the AZQP will receive plaques, and the top New Contesters will receive Arizona Prickly Pear Cactus Jelly awards. Participants can print their own ARRL-AZ QSL after working the Arizona Section Manager W7RAP. Detailed participation certificates can be created by all entrants. The Bonus Station this year is W7A. Results will be published shortly after the log due date of October 23. Join the party, make some contacts, and have ham radio fun in the AZQP! Check the Arizona QSO Party website for up-to-date information on awards, activated counties, multiplier abbreviations, resources, logs received, results and more.”

VY0ERC is the call sign of the Eureka Amateur Radio Club – “Probably the most northerly located Amateur Radio club in the world” according to their qrz.com page. And as of August 2019, VY0ERC reports signals heard via the Reverse Beacon Network and PSKReporter.info

The VY1 Multiplier in ARRL Sweepstakes will become even more difficult after the ham radio retirement of VY1JA due to health issues. According to the The Daily DX, J Allen worked his last station as VY1JA on September 14, and is concentrating on station shutdown. Logs have already been uploaded, and it’s expected that signals as the remote VY1AAA will also go quiet soon. (The Daily DX)

WORD TO THE WISE

Sibilant

As an adjective, having a hissing sound. Usually applies to components of speech with “s”, “sh”, “ch”, etc. Some microphones that are too “bright” may require “de-essers” to reduce sibilance.

SIGHTS AND SOUNDS

The GNURadioCon 2019 is going on this week in Huntsville, Alabama. Check out the agenda, and watch YouTube for the talks in the future. During the conference participants can even compete in a “Capture the Flag” contest.

Mike, W4AAW writes: “John, N0JSD, 14 years old, visited my shack to operate in the ARRL RTTY Roundup. Activity was slow, so John went to CW and happened across several stations in the CVA contest, a Contest for Brazilian Army personnel and veterans. We read the rules and found there was a teen category. John found the CVA contest among the N1MM Logger+ supported contests. He set up his exchange as, “599 TEEN.” With 1500 watts and a five-element monoband Yagi, his CQs got a lot of responses. He’s quite a good CW operator. John forwarded this message he received after the contest:

Hi John!

My name is Alisson. I’m a Brazilian ham and my call sign is PR7GA, but in CVA DX Contest I was using the call PR7CP, from our local Amateur Radio Club. We have made a QSO at Sunday, in CVA, by 20:37 UTC. You can hear the exact moment when I started to hear you at 20 meters in this YouTube video:

https://youtu.be/Fzop8eIsiB4?t=30471

I have recorded my entire operation in CVA. It’s in my channel.

I’m writing to you because I just want to say: Congratulations!!!!! When I heard your exchange, I was amazed…It’s not easy to see young men like you in the bands…Specially in CW.

I’m the editor of a weekly news BLOG of our club, called QTC ECRA. It’s also transmitted in our VHF repeaters and 80 meters, and also in YouTube. I’ll talk a little about you by tomorrow, to inspire other teens like you here in Brazil to discover our beloved hobby.

Nice to meet you! Hope to hear you again in the bands!

73s from Brazil!

Alisson, PR7GA

http://qtc.ecra.club

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RESULTS AND RECORDS

The Preliminary August NAQP SSB results should be on the NCJ website around the end of the week according to the NAQP SSB Manager Bill, AC0W. He’ll accept questions until October 4.

The 2019 ARRL RTTY Roundup final results article has been updated on the ARRL website. According to Jeff, WK6I: “An error in calculating the final scores was not detected until the author had already written most of the article, requiring him to restart the process. These FINAL results superceed earlier published Preliminary, and QST Summary, Results.”

OPERATING TIP

Get An Independent Evaluation

It’s important to understand your station’s strengths and weaknesses. But sometimes pride of ownership can cloud an accurate assessment of what most needs to be improved. Invite a fellow operator (even better, more than one) to use your station during a contest to really understand how it performs. You’ll need to convince them to be brutally honest. You might want to observe them during band changes, when conditions are difficult, etc. to see if they can take full advantage of what makes your station special. Then, you’ll have to convince yourself to listen to their critique without arguing with them. You might want that new amplifier, but it might be a better use of resources to have a better antenna.

TECHNICAL TOPICS AND INFORMATION

The amount of information transmitted by human languages per unit time may be constant across most human languages. Researchers measured the rate at approximately 39 bits per second, and found that some languages were able to encode concepts more succinctly than others.

Mel, N7GCO, winds power cables onto these “cable donuts” to keep excess amounts neat. You can find similar ones using a search engine.

When restoring or fixing gear, sometimes “coil dope” is called for as a coating to keep wires in place for coils, or to moisture proof components. Here’s an Instructable on how one person made their own with a solvent and polystyrene peanuts.

Plasma antennas use plasma instead of metal to form the elements of antennas. The concept was first patented in 1919, but technology to realize them hasn’t been practical, and still may not be.

I don’t have a specific application for the Milwaukee M12 600MCM Cable Cutter Kit, but I’m still searching. The battery-powered tool will cut smaller wires, so maybe the excuse I’ll use is that it will cut more radials to length faster.

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CONVERSATION

Orderly Shutdown

Nobody knows the significant time and investment you’ve made in this hobby as well as you do. That’s why it might be important to you and your family that your equipment is put in good hands in the event that you are no longer able to participate. You should have radio friends you can depend on to handle your gear fairly. Don’t forget the takedown of antennas and towers. Be considerate by reserving appropriate compensation for safe, professional removal. Your friends don’t want to be climbing towers that they’ve not maintained. Many more issues are discussed in the article “Silent Key Estate Planning – A Guide,” by Dino Papas, KL0S, in the September 2019 issue of QST.

Another thing to consider is formalizing an agreement with family members to keep your Amateur Radio friends informed and involved as your circumstances might change, perhaps suddenly. Family members, even close ones, who are not amateurs may not understand that strong friendships can be made and maintained over the air over years without seeing someone in person. Make sure that your intentions are clear and explicit about who should be kept in the loop, and provide alternate means of contact besides a frequency and a time.

That’s all for this time. Remember to send contesting related stories, book reviews, tips, techniques, press releases, errata, schematics, club information, pictures, stories, blog links, and predictions to contest-update@arrl.org

73, Brian N9ADG

CONTESTS

19 Sep – 2 Oct 2019

An expanded, downloadable version of QST’Contest Corral is available as a PDF. Check the sponsors’ website for information on operating time restrictions and other instructions.

HF CONTESTS

CWops Mini-CWT Test, Sep 18, 1300z to Sep 18, 1400z and, Sep 18, 1900z to Sep 18, 2000z and, Sep 19, 0300z to Sep 19, 0400z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; Member: Name + Member No., non-Member: Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: September 21.

NAQCC CW Sprint, Sep 19, 0030z to Sep 19, 0230z; CW; Bands: 80, 40, 20m; RST + (state/province/country) + (NAQCC No./power); Logs due: September 22.

NCCC RTTY Sprint, Sep 20, 0145z to Sep 20, 0215z; RTTY; Bands: (see rules); Serial No. + Name + QTH; Logs due: September 22.

NCCC Sprint, Sep 20, 0230z to Sep 20, 0300z; CW; Bands: (see rules); Serial No. + Name + QTH; Logs due: September 22.

AGB NEMIGA Contest, Sep 20, 2100z to Sep 21, 0000z; CW, SSB, Digital; Bands: 80m Only; AGB Member: RST + QSO No. + Member No., non-Member: RST + QSO No.; Logs due: October 20.

Collegiate QSO Party, Sep 21, 0000z to Sep 22, 2359z; CW/Digital, Phone, Digital; Bands: All, except WARC; School Name/abbreviation + RS(T) + operating class; Logs due: October 15.

Scandinavian Activity Contest, CW, Sep 21, 1200z to Sep 22, 1200z; CW; Bands: 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; RST + Serial No.; Logs due: September 27.

All Africa International DX Contest, Sep 21, 1200z to Sep 22, 1200z; CW, SSB, RTTY; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; RS(T) + Serial No.; Logs due: October 7.

SRT HF Contest SSB, Sep 21, 1300z to Sep 22, 1300z; SSB; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; RS + CQ Zone; Logs due: see rules.

Iowa QSO Party, Sep 21, 1400z to Sep 22, 0200z; CW, Phone, Digital; Bands: All, except WARC and 60m; IA: RS(T) + County, non-IA: RS(T) + (state/province/”DX”); Logs due: October 22.

QRP Afield, Sep 21, 1500z to Sep 21, 2100z; All; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; RS(T) + (state/province/country) + (power or NE QRP No.); Logs due: October 20.

Wisconsin Parks on the Air, Sep 21, 1600z to Sep 21, 2300z; SSB, FM; Bands: 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, 2m; WI Park: park abbreviation, Non-Park: (state/prvince/country); Logs due: September 30.

New Hampshire QSO Party, Sep 21, 1600z to Sep 22, 0400z and, Sep 22, 1600z to Sep 22, 2200z; CW/Digital, Phone; Bands: All, except WARC; NH: RS(T) + county, non-NH W/VE: RS(T) + (state/province), DX: RS(T) + “DX”; Logs due: October 31.

New Jersey QSO Party, Sep 21, 1600z to Sep 22, 0359z; CW, Phone, Digital; Bands: 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; NJ: RS(T) + county, non-NJ: RS(T) + (state/province/”DX”); Logs due: October 1.

Washington State Salmon Run, Sep 21, 1600z to Sep 22, 0700z and, Sep 22, 1600z to Sep 23, 0000z; CW, Phone, Digital; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, 6, 2m; WA: RS(T) + County, non-WA: RS(T) + (state/province/country); Logs due: October 6.

Feld Hell Sprint, Sep 21, 1800z to Sep 21, 1959z; Feld Hell; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, 6m; (see rules); Logs due: September 25.

Classic Exchange, Phone, Sep 22, 1300z to Sep 23, 0700z and, Sep 24, 1300z to Sep 25, 0700z; AM, SSB, FM; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, 6, 2m; Name + RS + (state/province/country) + rcvr/xmtr manuf/model; Logs due: November 1.

SKCC Sprint, Sep 25, 0000z to Sep 25, 0200z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; RST + (state/province/country) + Name + (SKCC No./power); Logs due: September 27.

Phone Fray, Sep 25, 0230z to Sep 25, 0300z; SSB; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15m; NA: Name + (state/province/country), non-NA: Name; Logs due: September 27.

CWops Mini-CWT Test, Sep 25, 1300z to Sep 25, 1400z and, Sep 25, 1900z to Sep 25, 2000z and, Sep 26, 0300z to Sep 26, 0400z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; Member: Name + Member No., non-Member: Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: September 28.

UKEICC 80m Contest, Sep 25, 2000z to Sep 25, 2100z; CW; Bands: 80m Only; 4-Character grid square; Logs due: September 25.

RSGB 80m Autumn Series, Data, Sep 26, 1900z to Sep 26, 2030z; RTTY, PSK; Bands: 80m Only; [other station’s call] + [your call] + [serial no.] + [your name]; Logs due: September 29.

NCCC RTTY Sprint, Sep 27, 0145z to Sep 27, 0215z; RTTY; Bands: (see rules); Serial No. + Name + QTH; Logs due: September 29.

NCCC Sprint, Sep 27, 0230z to Sep 27, 0300z; CW; Bands: (see rules); Serial No. + Name + QTH; Logs due: September 29.

CQ Worldwide DX Contest, RTTY, Sep 28, 0000z to Sep 30, 0000z; RTTY; Bands: 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; 48 States/Canada: RST + CQ Zone + (state/VE area), All Others: RST + CQ Zone; Logs due: October 4.

Maine QSO Party, Sep 28, 1200z to Sep 29, 1200z; CW, Phone; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; ME: RS(T) + county, non-ME: RS(T) + (state/province/”DX”); Logs due: October 14.

QCX Challenge, Sep 30, 1300z to Sep 30, 1400z and, Sep 30, 1900z to Sep 30, 2000z and, Oct 1, 0300z to Oct 1, 0400z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; RST + Name + (state/province/country) + Rig; Logs due: October 3.

IQRP Quarterly Marathon, Oct 1, 0800z to Oct 7, 2000z; CW, SSB, Digital; Bands: All; RS(T); Logs due: October 21.

Phone Fray, Oct 2, 0230z to Oct 2, 0300z; SSB; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15m; NA: Name + (state/province/country), non-NA: Name; Logs due: September 20.

CWops Mini-CWT Test, Oct 2, 1300z to Oct 2, 1400z and, Oct 2, 1900z to Oct 2, 2000z and, Oct 3, 0300z to Oct 3, 0400z; CW; Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m; Member: Name + Member No., non-Member: Name + (state/province/country); Logs due: September 21.

UKEICC 80m Contest, Oct 2, 2000z to Oct 2, 2100z; CW; Bands: 80m Only; 4-Character grid square; Logs due: September 25.

VHF+ CONTESTS

ARRL EME Contest, Sep 21, 0000z to Sep 22, 2359z; CW, Phone, Digital; Bands: 50-1296 MHz; Signal report; Logs due: December 17.

ARRL 10 GHz and Up Contest, Sep 21, 0600 (local) to Sep 23, 0000 (local); Any; Bands: 10 GHz to light; 6-Character Maidenhead Locator; Logs due: October 22.

SARL VHF/UHF Digital Contest, Sep 21, 1000z to Sep 22, 1000z; Digital; Bands: 50 MHz, 70 MHz, 144 MHz, 432 MHz, 1296 MHz; RST + 6-character grid locator; Logs due: October 14.

144 MHz Fall Sprint, Sep 23, 1900z to Sep 23, 2300z; not specified; Bands: 2m Only; 4-character grid square; Logs due: October 7.

222 MHz Fall Sprint, Oct 1, 1900z to Oct 1, 2300z; not specified; Bands: 222 MHz; 4-character grid square; Logs due: October 15.

AGCW VHF/UHF Contest, Sep 28, 1400z to Sep 28, 1700z (144) and, Sep 28, 1700z to Sep 28, 1800z (432); CW; Bands: 144 MHz, 432 MHz; RST + “/” + Serial No. + “/” Power class + “/” + 6-character grid locator; Logs due: October 14.

Also, see Collegiate QSO PartyIowa QSO PartyWisconsin Parks on the AirNew Hampshire QSO PartyWashington State Salmon RunFeld Hell SprintClassic Exchange, Phone, above.

LOG DUE DATES

19 Sep – 2 Oct 2019

September 19, 2019

September 20, 2019

September 21, 2019

September 22, 2019

September 23, 2019

September 24, 2019

September 25, 2019

September 26, 2019

September 27, 2019

September 28, 2019

September 29, 2019

September 30, 2019

October 1, 2019

October 2, 2019

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ARRL Contest Update wishes to acknowledge information from WA7BNM’s Contest Calendar and SM3CER’s Contest Calendar.

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Hawaii Island Amateur/Ham Radio News:

The Big Island Amateur Radio Club (BIARC) Simulated Emergency Test (SET) will be held on Saturday, 05 October 2019.  For details, go here:  http://biarc.net/2019set.shtml)

For the latest Amateur/Ham Radio news and information, please check the blog sidebars and links.  These news feeds are updated daily and weekly.  Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russell Roberts (KH6JRM)

Public Information Coordinator

Hawaii County, ARRL Pacific Section

https://bigislandarrlnews.com

Jim Tiemstra (K6JAT) Pacific Division visiting Hawaii


Welcome to the Hawaii Amateur/Ham Radio News update from Big Island ARRL News.

Views expressed in this Amateur/Ham Radio News summary are those of the reporters and correspondents.

Content supplied by Joseph Speroni (AH0A), ARRL Pacific Section Manager.

Accessed on 19 September 2019, 0030 UTC, Pos 1122.

Source:

https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/#inbox/FMfcgxwDrRLmnFpHVQjXGvQjMkWBGrQV

Please click link or scroll down to read Joe’s message.

Digital modes; Jim Tiemstra (K6JAT) Pacific Division Director visiting Hawaii

Inbox
x

ARRL Members Only Web site

1:40 PM (41 minutes ago)

 to me
Based on the minutes of the last ARRL board meeting, many have
questions
about potential rule making  affecting Hawaii hams use of digital
modes.
Frankly the minutes were ambiguous and did cause concern to many.

The ARRL has just published ex-parte comments on pending petitions and
FCC rule making related to digital modes. They make it clear the ARRL
is
supportive of evolving digital communications technologies.

The comments are now available at,

https://www.fcc.gov/ecfs/filing/10918259487629

Jim Tiemstra (KI6JAT), the Director of ARRL Pacific Division, is
visiting Oahu and the Big Island from November 7th to 14th and hopes to
meet with Amateurs to discuss ARRL activities of interest to Hawaii.
Few clubs have meetings during the period so arrangements are being
made
for separate events to give us a chance to meet and talk story. Drop me
an email if you are interested in meeting with us.

——————————————————————–
ARRL Pacific Section
Section Manager: Joseph Speroni, AH0A
ah0a@arrl.org
——————————————————————–

To unsubscribe from messages, go to:
http://p1k.arrl.org/oo/283404a559c8a4e2c77cebda29ddd10d

——————————————————————–
The ARES E-Letter for September 18, 2019
Editor:  Rick Palm (K1CE).
Please click link or scroll down to read your selections.

ARES, Others Respond to Hurricane Dorian

Colleague Rick Lindquist, WW1ME, of the ARRL news desk, and others in the field, diligently reported as Hurricane Dorian marched its historic track earlier this month. Summaries and reports can be found in the links listed below.

The website page www.arrl.org/2019-Hurricanes, includes information and news summarizing the preparations and response by ARES and other Amateur Radio volunteers who are supporting (or have supported) emergency communications in areas that may be (or have been) impacted by 2019 hurricanes. Operators provide critical communications capability used for relaying life-saving information and to assist with preparedness, response and recovery activities. Additionally, radio amateurs throughout affected regions often provide firsthand accounts of storm impact and ongoing recovery needs.

9/7/2019 | Hurricane Watch Net Activates as Dorian Exits the US for Maritime Canada

9/6/2019 | Hurricane Watch Net Suspends Operation; May Reactivate on Saturday

9/6/2019 | FCC Extends Waiver Permitting Use of PACTOR 4 for Hurricane Relief Efforts

9/4/2019 | Storm Watch Continues Along Southeastern US Coast

9/4/2019 | Tracking Dorian: Hurricane Watch Net Hunkered Down for the Long Haul

9/3/2019 | FCC Readies for Hurricane Dorian

9/2/2019 | ARES on Alert for Hurricane Dorian’s Possible Arrival

9/2/2019 | FCC Grants Temporary Waiver Permitting Use of PACTOR 4 for Hurricane Response and Relief

9/1/2019 | Major Hurricane Dorian Prompts Sustained Activations

8/31/2019 | Florida ARES Members Volunteer in Preparation for Hurricane Dorian

8/30/2019 | Hurricane Watch Net Set to Activate on Saturday

8/29/2019 | Amateur Radio Resources Ready as Dorian Poised to Become a Major Hurricane
8/28/2019 | Dorian Gains Hurricane Status, Forecast to Strengthen into Major Storm
8/28/2019 | Amateur Radio Resources Muster as Dorian Nears Hurricane Strength
8/26/2019 | Hurricane Watch Net Set to Activate as Caribbean Prepares for Dorian

During the emergency management phase of Hurricane Dorian, Bill Jorgensen, Director of Public Safety for Williamson County, Tennessee, thanked AUXCOMM operators: “This morning at 0700 we sent out a 3-person Communications Unit (COMU) to support Tennessee Task Force 2 en route to the east coast for 10 days. This unit consists of a 100′ tower trailer, operational logistics trailer and a 45 kV gen set along with a mix of COML/COMT/ITSL (Technology Service Unit Leader) personnel. Modes and frequencies employed included VHF/UHF/700/800/HF SHARES/Winlink including FirstNet/Verizon and some satellite capabilities. Thank you to all the AuxComm volunteers that supported this deployment before we left and those that will continue to support the Winlink system while deployed.”
Steve Waterman, K4CJX, DHS NCC SHARES Winlink Administrator and FEMA Region 4 Regional Emergency Communications Coordination Working Group (RECCWG) AuxComm Committee Chair commented “It is yet another shining, but typical example of the influence of Amateur Radio’s role in assisting our civil authorities and their critical infrastructure partners during mass casualty events.” The Tennessee Emergency Management Agency (TEMA) COMU unit, comprised of Amateur Radio volunteers, worked to deploy assets also.

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Save the Dates: Communications Academy, Training for the Pacific Northwest

The 22nd Annual Communications Academy will be held on April 25-26, 2020, in Seattle, Washington, with the theme of “If Cascadia Rises, Will We Fall?” – part of a three-year continuum building up to Cascadia Rising 2022, a National Level Exercise (NLE), and statewide exercise. The Communications Academy delivers education, resources and training opportunities focused on interoperability across the communications spectrum. It is two days of training and information on various aspects of emergency communications. ARES, Auxiliary Communications Service (ACS), EOC Support Teams, Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Service (RACES), Civil Air Patrol, Coast Guard Auxiliary, REACT, CERT and anyone interested in emergency communications are encouraged to attend.

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Former Section Manager Recognized by City Commission

Steve Szabo, WB4OMM, former ARRL Northern Florida Section Manager, was recognized recently the Daytona Beach city commissioners. “City Spotlight: Keeping our great community prepared and safe — In emergency situations, knowledge and experience are vital, but it also takes a calm presence and a steady hand. Luckily for the City of Daytona Beach, it has Capt. Steve Szabo at the helm when it comes to emergency management. Planning year round for emergency incidents – whether natural or man-made – is a passion for this professional who works out of the Daytona Beach Police Department headquarters. Steve’s love for emergencies began at 16 years old when he gained experience as an amateur radio operator. He started at the police department in 1981 and worked his way up into many leadership positions. During his career he served as the

Steve Szabo, WB4OMM

city’s night shift incident commander for the 1998 Wildfires and worked eight tornadoes and 21 hurricanes. Most notably he was the city’s emergency operations center director during hurricanes Charley, Frances and Jeanne in 2004, Hurricane Wilma in 2005, the Christmas day tornado in 2006, Hurricane Matthew in 2016, Hurricane Irma in 2017 and Hurricane Dorian. He also actively contributes to the contingency planning for special events including seven presidential visits to the city. While we can’t prevent disasters from happening, we can control how we respond to them, and the City of Daytona Beach is proud to have had Steve at the helm of emergency management all of these years protecting our residents.”

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Antenna Design Defies RFI-laden EOC

Alachua County (Gainesville area), Florida, ARES members proved that a temporary antenna just tens of yards away from the heavy RFI environment of the EOC had far less electromagnetic interference (noise) than even an improved rooftop antenna they had been using. Here’s what they did next:

“So we set to work to put in a permanent antenna there,” reported Gordon Gibby, KX4Z, a project manager and ARES leading light for the county and state.” On August 11, five of us assembled and waded into the thick underbrush to put up the 270-foot long off-center-fed homemade inverted vee wire antenna using a 4:1 balun. The bazooka-like bicycle-pump-powered device that Leland Gallup, AA3YB, used to place our line over the desired tree limb (on the first try) was amazingly effective. Getting the long #14 stranded house-wiring through the dense woods was quite an effort.”

“Once we got it up, the noise measurements were excellent as we had hoped. Setting up one of our HF go-boxes on the spot, we proceeded to make day-time 80-meter digital connections to two Winlink gateways on the band that were in NVIS range. We had previously been unable to make those connections with the rooftop antenna due to 20dB excess noise levels at those frequencies.”

Thanks to the good work of the radio crew, a tension line was established from the EOC building to a suitable tree, and the coax into the radio room was rerouted to the new antenna, named the Chigger Antenna because all of the crew was scratching chigger bites for days afterwards.

Early History of Amateur Emergency Communications

To fully appreciate anything, it’s helpful to understand its history. For amateur emergency communications, that is certainly true; however, it is also simply fascinating. Not much has changed in over a hundred years of the radio amateur’s role in the disaster and emergency communications arena, except for ever-advancing technology and technique. The following are some gold nuggets I found from reading — and re-reading and highlighting – ARRL Assistant Secretary Clinton B. DeSoto’s classic 1936 book, Two Hundred Meters and Down–The Story of Amateur Radio.

On just the second page of the book, DeSoto, in describing the typical radio amateur of 1936, offers up an adventurous band of free spirits involved in the radio art for the simple love of it, but turning serious about altruistic service to humanity when it came time to “saving a hundred lives in a fever-ravished Alaskan village . . .” Technical advancement of the art is their contribution to humanity, too, but with an unparalleled service “of matchless heroism in flood and disaster, . . . with their great emergency system of communications carrying on when all others have failed. In many years no community in distress in this country has been without valiant aid from Amateur Radio.”

DeSoto called emergency communications by amateurs the “Flower of the Art.”

Early history of amateur communications also involves the handling of traffic, upon which, among other things, the ARRL was formed in 1914. Traffic handling by relaying is the essence of emergency communications, of course. “Floods, hurricanes, earthquakes – disasters of all varieties provide a large part of the amateur message total in the form of emergency traffic. Amateurs almost invariably form the last line of communication in times of natural emergency; this has been true in more than forty major and a large number of minor disasters in the past twenty years [that’s from 1916 to 1936 – ed.] . Tragedy, drama, human interest incidents of all kinds, provocative of both laughter and tears, have all been logged in these hard-worked amateur radio stations.”

DeSoto described the predominant characteristic of the amateur is his altruism: and that certainly is still true today, a hundred years later.

In 1913, on the heels of the research and development of radio design of the time, the primary interest had become application and practice, namely communication and the handling of messages. Amateurs occasionally handled traffic for third parties.

In March, 1913, “a possible new activity for amateur radio made itself apparent when amateur stations successfully bridged the communications gap surrounding a large isolated area left by a severe windstorm in the Midwest. Amateur stations at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor and at Ohio State University, in conjunction with numerous individual amateurs in and around the stricken area, handled widespread communications . . .”

Message handling, especially the organized relaying of those messages, for fun, friends, and in time of emergency formed the basis of the ARRL, which was to be founded the following year as the needed national organization to represent the amateur’s interests. Operating speeds increased with the resulting increased proficiency, and advantages of national representation were manifest.

With significant service with proficiency already provided in times of emergency, the government and the ARRL worked together to prepare for war and the necessary radio operators to support it. In 1917, amateurs were ordered off the air, and as the US went to war, thousands of amateurs with the requisite emergency and message handling experience served the war effort until the Armistice in 1918.

Amateurs were back on the air in late 1919, and a year later, had turned to a new activity, the precursor to many services rendered today to law enforcement and emergency management: “amateur police radio,” assisting the police with major crime solving efforts, including stolen automobiles.

In 1922, State governors hailed Amateur Radio operators as a “reserve of radio minute men for national emergencies.”

In 1929, a new Army-Amateur Radio System organized networks across the country to assist the Army and American Red Cross for disaster relief communications.

In 1931, after years of experimentation to promote long distance communications, relative to the five-meter band, a few hams realized that there was a place for communications of just a few miles, or “line of sight,” a realization that would serve as the bedrock for countless ARES groups forever more.

In 1933, new regulations permitted mobile operation at UHF; informal portable operation was also permitted.

Early Emergency Responses

Amateur Radio disaster responses from1919 to 1936 are summarized in chapter twenty – “Emergencies.” DeSoto wrote “Since 1919 Amateur Radio has been the principal if not the only communication link following nearly forty major and a great number of less consequential disasters.” He cites the Great Flood of March 1936 as the greatest amateur emergency public service of the time. As flooding expanded, normal communications were cut off, and amateur communication systems expanded flexibly and spontaneously to meet the need in the disaster that affected the entire eastern US. Many were based on the Army-Amateur, Naval Reserve and the ARRL Emergency Corps, forerunner of today’s ARES program. At the peak of activity, it was estimated that a thousand amateur stations were engaged in providing effective emergency communications for prompt warning of authorities, immediate evacuation of threatened areas, and expedient supply of relief and rescue assistance. By the end of 1936, amateurs had earned nation-wide recognition for effecting communications where all other means had failed.

Conclusions

In the last chapter of his book, DeSoto expresses what still rings true today: The right of Amateur Radio to exist comes from its public utility. Operators perform a continuing public service in that they train themselves in a highly-specialized and difficult field to be of use to the nation in time of emergency.

K1CE for a Final: Dorian Response Observation; Two Hundred Meters and Down; Larry Price, W4RA; Red Cross Shelters and ARES

I listened to the hurricane nets over the course of Hurricane Dorian’s destructive path. Once again, net and operator discipline was exemplary: the nets were kept clear for transmissions from potentially weak stations in the affected areas. I did hear one station not in any sensitive areas ask net control for confirmations of some reports, and another time, he advised the net control station that another storm was tracking of the coast of Africa and the net may want to monitor its progress, too. Net control appropriately responded by informing the station that the mission of the net was limited to taking reports from Dorian-affected stations. The lesson: Do NOT transmit on hurricane nets unless you are reporting on storm conditions you are actually experiencing, or if instructed by the NCS to do so. Period.

_____________

Want a thrill like no other for less than $16 and a few hours on a Sunday afternoon? Do what I did and read DeSoto’s 200 Meters and Down – The Story of Amateur Radio. Published in 1936, it covers the discovery of radio physics, experimentation, application, and the breathtaking development of Amateur Radio in the dawn of the art. The main takeaway, among many others, for me was the degree to which amateurs and Amateur Radio operators were involved in the development of all radio communications, including the broadcasting service. Pick up the book, and find yourself amazed of the early pioneering work of radio amateurs, the kind of pioneering that still goes on today.

______________

Larry E. Price, W4RA

Last but certainly not least, I was saddened to learn of the passing of ARRL and IARU President Emeritus Larry Price, W4RA. It is difficult to think of any one ARRL volunteer who worked harder, and for as long, for the organizations and for Amateur Radio than Dr. Price. I had the privilege of working with him as a HQ staff administrative resource in the 1980s and 90s: he was motivated by and demanding of only the highest standards of work product to the benefit of the organizations and all of us in Amateur Radio.

______________

In the October issue of QST, on page 86, you’ll find an excellent interview with Jim Piper, N6MED, the Volunteer Health Services Liaison to Amateur Radio for the American Red Cross Gold Country Region in northern California. I encourage you to read it. I should note that the opinions expressed in the interview are strictly Jim’s and not those of the Red Cross.

ARRL Resources Available

Join or Renew Today! ARRL membership includes QST, Amateur Radio’s most popular and informative journal, delivered to your mailbox each month.

Subscribe to NCJ — the National Contest Journal. Published bi-monthly, features articles by top contesters, letters, hints, statistics, scores, NA Sprint and QSO Parties.

Subscribe to QEX — A Forum for Communications Experimenters. Published bi-monthly, features technical articles, construction projects, columns and other items of interest to radio amateurs and communications professionals.

Free of charge to ARRL members: Subscribe to the ARES E-Letter (monthly public service and emergency communications news), the ARRL Contest Update (bi-weekly contest newsletter), Division and Section news alerts — and much more!

Find us on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter.

ARRL offers a wide array of products to enhance your enjoyment of Amateur Radio.

Donate to the fund of your choice — support programs not funded by member dues!

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__________

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For the latest Amateur/Ham Radio news and information, please check the blog sidebars and links.  These news feeds are updated daily and weekly.  Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russell Roberts (KH6JRM)

Public Information Coordinator

Hawaii County, ARRL Pacific Section

https://bigislandarrlnews.com

BIARC summary of the ARES SET


Welcome to the “BIARC summary of the ARES SET” scheduled for Saturday,  05 October 2019,

Views expressed in this Amateur/Ham Radio news summary are those of the reporters and correspondents.

Content supplied by Tony Kitchen (WH6DVI) and the Big Island Amateur Radio Club (BIARC).

Accessed on 18 September 2019, 1540 UTC, Post 1121.

Source:  http://biarc.net/2019set.shtml

Please click link or scroll down to read the complete message.

B.I.A.R.C
Big Island Amateur Radio Club
KH6EJ
BIARC Home

Club Information

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External Links

Information

2019 ARES Hawaii Simulated Emergency Training

Saturday, October 5th.

SUMMARY:

Training Scenerio:
A major hurricane is hitting the Hawaiian Islands, with sustained winds of 150 MPH and gusts to 200 MPH. Phones, the electrical grid, and fixed antennas are down island-wide. See http://hawaiiares.info for details.

9:00 AM – 12:00 AM

Amateurs Radio operators in local communities will set up spoke and hub communication groups and report messages to/from participating agencies and groups. Field stations will need to make up realistic message traffic that fits the given scenerio and pass the traffic to hubs, comply with the instructions of net control stations, and follow best practices. Served agencies will include:

  • Hawaii County Civil Defence – ACS
    • SITREPs
    • Requests for Assistance
    • Requests for Information
    • Hub Stations will relay Emergency Alert Announcements from the EOC to field operators.
  • Skywarn
  • HealthCom

2:00 PM – 5:00 PM

  • Simulated health and welfare message traffic will be passed through the Oahu Superstation KH6YY via Winlink. These messages will be relayed to an RMS station on the mainland and sent to any Winlink or regular internet email address.See http://hawaiiares.info for more details.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:

The following information and ideas have came out of the meetings and conversations so far:

  • In any real emergency/disaster, everyone is expected to use 911 first. This is the most effective interface to police/fire/ems. If you have a home phone that is “POTS” (Plain old telephone system) that can work when modern services fail. Review the criteria for 911. See https://www.hawaiipolice.com/dispatch-911
  • When phones do not work, amateur radio operators in the field pass information to hub stations, and hub stations pass traffic to ACS or other served groups via voice, Winlink, or whatever works. By the time the information gets to the EOC, both the hub station and ACS will have made efforts to present it in a way that best fits the needs of the EOC.
  • The purpose of reviewing the forms at HawaiiCert.org is for everyone to learn what information the ACS is expecting, and in what order. They are looking for the STANDARDIZATION of responses. By Looking at each form on the Hawaiicert.org website and clicking the down arrow next to each field under each form, you can see the terminology and types of standard responses they need. For example, the person in need of help is called the “requesting party” and the amateur radio operator is called the “reporting party” They also request telephone number and email addresses because even though these systems may be down now, they could quickly come up on line. We need to adapt to the situation at hand. When doing an RFA for urgent medical help, the email address may not be important. A phone number might be, but what if phone lines are hopelessly destroyed? In that case the Radio operator’s call sign is most important. We may want to include both the hub and field stations call in in our reporting.
  • The Hub station operator working VHF is the person who needs to be most familiar with the needs of the served groups. They may need to do a Q&A with inexperienced operators in the field, to get all the important information. Remember this is all about getting the needed information accurately, in the correct order, and in a standardized way. It is NOT about the form itself. See the information under “Resources, References” at the Hawaiicert.org website.
  • The information published on Hawaiicert.org is not just for CERT, it tells us what information the HC CDA and the EOC are looking for, and it applies to everyone.
  • For Winlink use, we can pick a few preexisting Winlink forms that track best with the needs of the served agency or group. (RFA, RFI, SITREP, etc.) Winlink forms are routinely being updated. We need to experiment to determine how well Winlink forms will help us quickly get the correct information relayed to the correct party.

Discussion with the served agencies and groups are on-going. More information will be published as it developes. If you know someone at an agency or organization that may need emergency communications assistance during a disaster, please reach out and discuss with them how ham radio operators can help. Feel free to pass along my email address so we can begin a conversation.

Tony Kitchen, WH6DVI
Chair, BIARC Public Service Communications Committee
tonykitchen808@gmail.com

 


Except where noted, all original content Copyright © BIARC.net and Big Island Amateur Radio Club 2005 – 2019. All rights reserved.


Big Island Amateur Radio Club. P. O. Box 1938, Hilo, HI 96721-1938.

For the latest Amateur/Ham Radio news and information, please check the blog sidebars and links.  These news feeds are updated daily and weekly. Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russell Roberts (KH6JRM)

Public Information Coordinator

Hawaii County, ARRL Pacific Section

https://bigislandarrlnews.com

ARRL News-Features


Welcome to the “ARRL News-Features” update from Big Island ARRL News.

Views expressed in this Amateur/Ham Radio news summary are those of the reporters and correspondents.

Content supplied by HQ ARRL, 225 Main Street, Newington, CT, 06111.

Accessed on 18 September 2019, 0750 UTC, Post 1120.

Source:  http://www.arrl.org/news-features

Please click link or scroll down to read your selections.

—————————-

Hawaii Island Amateur/Ham Radio News:

Doug Wilson (KH7DQ) is offering one more free

Technician License Class this year.  The new class

begins on Thursday, 17 October 2019, at the

Keaau Community Center in Keaau, Hawaii Island.

For details: douscellle@aol.com


For the latest Amateur/Ham Radio news and information, please check the blog sidebars and links. These news feeds are updated daily and weekly.

Aloha es 73 de Russell Roberts (KH6JRM)

Public Information Coordinator

Hawaii County, ARRL Pacific Section

https://bigislandarrlnews.com

 

 

QRZ Now-Ham Radio News


Welcome to the “QRZ Now” update from Big Island ARRL News.

Views expressed in this Amateur/Ham Radio news summary are those of the reporters and correspondents.

Content supplied by “QRZ Now”.

Source:  https://qrznow.com/latest-posts/

Please click link or scroll down to read your selections.

RECENT POSTS

ANTENNA

Chameleon MPAS 2.0 Modular Portable Antenna System

Chameleon MPAS 2.0 Modular Portable Antenna System

“Chameleon Antennas recently updated their Modular Portable Antenna System or MPAS with the goal of it being the most versatile, high performanc… Read more 


Hawaii Island Amateur/Ham Radio News:

Doug Wilson (KH7DQ) is offering one more free

Technician License Class on Hawaii Island.  The

class begins Thursday, 17 October 2019 at the

Keaau Community Center. For details, please

contact Doug at douscelle@aol.com


For the latest Amateur/Ham Radio news and

information, please check the news feeds along

the blog sidebars.  These news articles are up-

dated daily and weekly.  Thanks for joining us

today.


Aloha es 73 de Russell Roberts (KH6JRM)

Public Information Coordinator

Hawaii County, ARRL Pacific Section

https://bigislandarrlnews.com

 

Southgate Amateur Radio Club News


Welcome to the Sunday edition of “Southgate Amateur Radio Club News” from Big Island ARRL News.  Views expressed in this Amateur/Ham Radio news summary are those of the reporters and correspondents.

Content provided by the UK-based Southgate Amateur Radio Club.

Source:

http://www.southgatearc.org

Please click link or scroll down to read your selections.  This report covers the period of 13 September 2019 through 15 September 2019.

News for Sunday 15 September

QSO Today – Burt Fisher – K1OIK
Burt Fisher, K1OIK, raised a stir and perhaps the ire of many hams with a 2008 YouTube video critical of amateur radio operators and their operating practices

Montana’s Dept of Justice to issue 200 ham radios
The Havre Daily News reports Montana’s Havre and Hill County Local Emergency Planning Committee intend to take up a Department of Justice offer of amateur radio equipment

Makrothen RTTY Contest
The Makrothen is coming! The Makrothen RTTY Contest is 1 month away!
Originally conceived by Waldemar Kebsch, DK3VN and now sponsored by Pizza Lovers 259 (PL259), the contest takes place each year during the second full weekend in October

Practical Wireless 70MHz Contest
The Practical Wireless 70MHz Contest takes place on Sunday 22nd September 13:00 to 16:00 UTC

The SARL RF Noise Workshop 28 September
The workshop at the NARC on 28 September starts with a panel discussion about various ways to solve mains induced noise. The panel will present a case study and will show how, with a few simple measures, a reduction in mains noise can be achieved.

Amateur Radio Is There When All Else Fails
Jefferson Public Radio (JPR) interviews Joe Bassett W1WCN and Steve Bosbach KW5V about the role of amateur radio in a natural disaster

FT4 Contest results released
The RSGB Contest Committee have released the results of the first 80m FT4 one hour contest

NO-104 camera will be ‘live’ this week
Controllers for NO-104 (PSAT-2) announced on September 13 that they have commanded the camera to take a picture and store it into memory every 10 minutes. This mode should last for 7 days or at least to next commanding session on Monday

Two contests this coming weekend
The second leg of the The South African Radio League (SARL) VHF/UHF Digital Contest is on the air from 10:00 UTC on Saturday 21 September to 10:00 UTC on Sunday 22 September 2019 with activity from 6 metres and up

YOTA 2019 Summer Camp in Bulgaria spawns sub-regional camps
Most of those attending the recent Youngsters on the Air (YOTA) summer camp in Bulgaria were first-timers, observed Monty Schebesta, OE3VVU, a participant this year

IARU Region 3 approves new 15m satellite allocation
The International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) – Region 3 (Asia-Pacific Region) Directors meeting was held in Tokyo September 2-3

Propagation Report from Hannes Coetzee, ZS6BZP
Hannes Coetzee, ZS6BZP, reports that the solar activity is expected to remain at low levels

We’re taking a short break
Southgate News will be taking a short break from Monday, 16 September

We’ll be back again on Friday, 20th of September. I hope to see you all again then.
Thanks – Richard g4tut

 

News for Saturday 14 September

Foundations of Amateur Radio
Planning for an outing
Recently I had the opportunity to use a new radio whilst I was far away from my shack. It wasn’t unexpected, I took the radio with me, planned for the experience and packed light with intent

Taurus-1 with Codec-2 transponder launched
Taurus-1 (Jinniuzuo-1) carrying an amateur radio FM to Codec-2 transponder was launched on a CZ-4B rocket from the Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center on Thursday, September 12 at 0326 GMT

FCC seeks to streamline its hearings process
The FCC is asking for public comments on procedural changes that, if adopted, would streamline many administrative hearings under the Communications Act of 1934, as amended

University CubeSat Club members get ham radio licenses
Students at the Villanova University College of Engineering started a CubeSat Club in the fall of 2018 and have since got their amateur radio licensesImage: Some of the CubeSat Club members – credit Villanova University

The Space Weather Woman
Sound the All Clear After Aurora – The latest space weather forecast from Dr Tamitha Skov WX6SWW

Satellite, GNU Radio and SDR talks released
Mark M5BOP reports the complete set of amateur radio technical talks from this year’s Martlesham Microwave Round Table is now available to watch on YouTube

Local commercial radio update: Communicorp UK Limited
Ofcom has approved requests from commercial radio group Communicorp UK Limited to change the formats of two stations in Peterborough and Kettering, Corby and Wellingborough

SSTV on BBC’s ‘The Capture’
Whilst watching a recording of episode 2 of ‘The Capture‘ on BBC 1 a couple of nights ago, I suddenly heard a familiar sound

Propagation de K7RA
No sunspots this week. Average daily sunspot numbers declined from 3.4 to 0. At the same time, average daily solar flux rose from 67.4 to 69.4

 

News for Friday 13 September

AMSAT-LU PicoBalloons travel around the globe
The WSPR Picoballoon on 14.0956 USB released August 31 is about to complete its first circumnavigation of the globe after traveling 33,000 km in 12 days

Amateur Radio Digital Communications (ARDC) awards generous grant to ARISS
Amateur Radio Digital Communications (ARDC) has awarded a very generous grant to ARISS for the Next Generation radio system. ARDC is the owner and manager of the Internet network known as the AMPRNet

IARU Region 3 approves new bandplan
The IARU Region 3 Directors meeting was held in Tokyo September 2-3. A modified interim Region 3 bandplan was approved which included an Amateur-Satellite Service allocation in the 15m band

RAC planning meeting underway
The biennial Planning Meeting of Radio Amateurs of Canada is now underway in Moncton, New Brunswick just ahead of the RAC Annual General Meeting which will be held on Saturday, September 14

100 years of radio from Königs Wusterhausen
On December 22, 1920, something remarkable happened in Königs Wusterhausen

September GEO Newsletter available for download
The September PDF of the GEO Newsletter weather satellite publication produced by the Group for Earth Observation is now available for free download

A possible interstellar comet enters the solar system
A new comet just discovered by amateur astronomer Gennady Borisov is rocketing through the solar system too fast for the sun’s gravity to hang onto it. Indeed, it appears to be a visitor from the stars

VK6WIA NewsWest
NewsWest for Sunday 15th September 2019 is the New Amateurs edition, and we’re giving our attention to New Amateurs, with hints, tips and recognition of those who have gained a new license or new callsign

DX News from the ARRL
The American Radio Relay League’s round-up of the forthcoming week’s DX activity on the amateur radio bands

Hawaii Island Amateur/Ham Radio News:

Doug Wilson (KH7DQ) is offering one more free

Technician License Class this year.  The new class

begins on Thursday, 17 October 2019, at the Keaau

Community Center. For details: douscelle@aol.com


For the latest Amateur/Ham Radio news and in-

formation, please check the blog sidebars and links.

These news feeds are updated daily and weekly.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russell Roberts (KH6JRM)

Public Information Coordinator

Hawaii County, ARRL Pacific Section

https://bigislandarrlnews.com

ARLD037 Propagation de K7RA


Welcome to the Propagation Forecast update from Big Island ARRL News.

Views expressed in this Amateur/Ham Radio News summary are those of the reporters and correspondents.

Content provided by Tad Cook (K7RA) and HQ ARRL, 225 Main Street, Newington, CT, 06111.

Accessed on 14 September 2019, 1630 UTC, Post 1117.

Source:

https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/?tab=rm&ogbl#label/ARRL+website/FMfcgxwDrHqWJZkTfvhWZKKdNgkPmlbg

Please click the link or scroll down to read the complete update.

ARRL Web site

Sep 13, 2019, 7:58 AM (22 hours ago)

 to me
SB PROP @ ARL $ARLP037
ARLP037 Propagation de K7RA

ZCZC AP37
QST de W1AW
Propagation Forecast Bulletin 37  ARLP037
From Tad Cook, K7RA
Seattle, WA  September 13, 2019
To all radio amateurs

SB PROP ARL ARLP037
ARLP037 Propagation de K7RA

No sunspots this week. Average daily sunspot numbers declined from
3.4 to 0. At the same time, average daily solar flux rose from
67.4 to 69.4.

Geomagnetic activity quieted, with average daily planetary A index
declining from 19.9 to 8.9, while average daily mid-latitude A index
went from 16.7 to 7.7.

Predicted solar flux is 68 on September 13-22, 69 on September 23
through October 5, 68 on October 6-19, 69 on October 20-24, 68 on
October 25 and 69 on October 26-27.

Predicted planetary A index is 5 on September 13-22, 8 on September
23, 5 on September 24-25, then 10, 35, 45, 20 and 10 on September
26-30, then 8, 10 and 8 on October 1-3, 5 on October 4-19, 8 on
October 20, 5 on October 21-22, then 8, 25, 30, 18 and 8 on October
23-27.

Geomagnetic activity forecast for the period September 13 til
October 9, 2019 from F.K. Janda, OK1HH.

“Geomagnetic field will be
Quiet on: September 14-16, 20 (-21,) November 8-9
Quiet to unsettled on: September 13, 17-19, 22, (24,) November 4-7
Quiet to active on: September 23, 25, 30, November 1-3
Unsettled to active on: September (26)
Active to disturbed: September (27-29)

“Solar wind will intensify on: September 16, (24-27,) 28-30. October
1 (-4, 7-9)

“-Parenthesis means lower probability of activity enhancement.
-The predictability of changes remains lower at present.”

Jon Jones, N0JK wrote: “There was some sporadic-E skip on 6 meters
September 1 from the Midwest to Mexico to W6 and W7. From Kansas, I
worked XE2OR in Mexico, and several stations in Arizona and
California.

“On September 7, stations in New England worked the Gulf Coast. The
Es may have been associated with active geomagnetic field
conditions.”

Ken Brown, N4SO of Grand Bay, Alabama reports on his recent FT8
contacts on 17 and 40 meters: “17 Meters remains stable and a very
good daylight band for DX.  Here is a sample of contacts on the FT8
digital mode.

“18.100 FT8  Sept. 11
135800 -15  0.1 1795   N4SO SP9DWT RR73 (Poland)
170830 -17  0.3 1278   N4SO 5B4ALJ RR73  (Mike in Cyprus)
170900 -16  0.4  779   CQ AL ON5CD JO20   Belgium  (Note calling CQ
for Alabama.
171130 -11  0.4  779   N4SO ON5CD RR73
171700 -16  0.2 1676   CQ MM0CEZ IO75     Scotland

“40 Meters remains an excellent band for DX contacts during the night
with a world-wide range of countries on the FT8 digital mode.

“7.074 FT8  Sept. 9
131415  -1  0.5 1705   CQ KH2L QK23       Guam
132945  -9  0.1 2340   N4SO KH2L R-23
133000  Tx      2378   KH2L N4SO RR73”

Mike, K6THZ in Santa Clara, California reports unexpected
propagation on 15 meters via FT8 late at night, including a QSO with
Norway.

If you would like to make a comment or have a tip for our readers,
email the author at, k7ra@arrl.net.

For more information concerning radio propagation, see the ARRL
Technical Information Service web page at,
http://arrl.org/propagation-of-rf-signals. For an explanation of
numbers used in this bulletin, see
http://arrl.org/the-sun-the-earth-the-ionosphere.

An archive of past propagation bulletins is at
http://arrl.org/w1aw-bulletins-archive-propagation. More good
information and tutorials on propagation are at http://k9la.us/.

Monthly propagation charts between four USA regions and twelve
overseas locations are at http://arrl.org/propagation.

Instructions for starting or ending email distribution of ARRL
bulletins are at http://arrl.org/bulletins.

Sunspot numbers for September 5 through 11, 2019 were 0, 0, 0, 0, 0,
0, and 0, with a mean of 0. 10.7 cm flux was 68.3, 68.9, 73.9, 67.5,
68.8, 70, and 68.1, with a mean of 69.4. Estimated planetary A
indices were 14, 8, 7, 10, 14, 4, and 5, with a mean of 8.9. Middle
latitude A index was 11, 9, 6, 9, 11, 4, and 4, with a mean of 7.7.
NNNN
/EX

————————

Hawaii Island Amateur/Ham Radio News:

Don’t forget “Hawaii Grid Madness 2019” this Sunday (15

September 2019), from 1300 to 1700 HST.  You can find the

revised contest package here:

https://gridmadness.blogspot.com


For the latest Amateur/Ham Radio news and information, please

check the blog sidebars and links.  These news feeds are updated

daily and weekly.  Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russell Roberts (KH6JRM).

Public Information Coordinator

Hawaii County, ARRL Pacific Section

https://bigislandarrlnews.com

Latest Amateur Radio news-information

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